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October 13 2013

19:58

Restless Empire: China and the world since 1750 - Video and audio - News and media - Home

Speaker(s): Professor Arne Westad Chair: Professor Michael Cox Recorded on 1 November 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building. Arne Westad argues that China’s role in international affairs over the past 250 years has been determined by the country’s restless irresolution and its immense capacity for change. In this lecture he will discuss the significance of China’s past for its behaviour in international affairs today. Arne Westad is director of LSE IDEAS. http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1629

January 13 2012

05:32

The Global Financial Crisis Revisited - Video and audio - News and media - Home

LSE public lecture audio podcast and video media player page Recorded on 11 May 2009 in Old Theatre, Old Building. Journalists Will Hutton and Martin Wolf discuss the global financial crisis. What are its dimensions? Have governments done enough to avoid the worst economic outcomes? And is the global economy teetering on the edge of depression? http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=2
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December 29 2011

23:52

LSE Public Lecture - Christ to Coke? How image becomes icon.

Speaker(s): Professor Martin Kemp Chair: Nick Byrne Recorded on 3 November 2011 in Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House. Informative, funny, sad, and surprising by turns, this is the first book to look at all the main types of visual icon, taking eleven mega-famous examples, from Christ to the Coke bottle, to see how they arose and how they continue to function. Image, branding, and logos are obsessions of our age. Iconic images dominate the media. This event marks the publication of Kemp's new book Christ to Coke: How Image Becomes Icon. Martin Kemp FBA is Emeritus Professor in the History of Art at Trinity College, Oxford University. He has written, broadcast and curated exhibitions on imagery in art and science from the Renaissance to the present day. Nick Byrne is Director of the LSE Language Centre and a member of the LSE's Arts Advisory Group. http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1231

June 07 2011

04:40

Nuclear Arms and Human Rights

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Michael Cox This event was recorded on 1 March 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building The decisive breakthroughs in the Cold War occurred in seemingly unrelated fields – nuclear arms control and human rights. But was the collapse of communism a reflection of imperial overstretch or the result of liberal aspirations for freedom? This event celebrates the publication of Professor Ferguson's new book Civilization: The West and the Rest. Niall Ferguson is Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2010-11. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:20

LSE Literary Festival 2011 - Through the Soviet Looking-Glass

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Francis Spufford Chair: Professor Janet Hartley This event was recorded on 19 February 2011 in Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building At first sight, the USSR of the 1950s and 1960s is a formidably remote and strange place for an early 21st-century western observer to try to inhabit: ideological, materially alien, suffused with obsolete expectations, and operating in its daily life and economic life according to rules that eerily reverse our own. But the reward for crossing this particular imaginative border, argues Francis Spufford, is the discovery, in the mirrorworld of the Soviet Union, of deeply recognisable human behaviour, and deeply familiar human hopes. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:14

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 January 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building 'Nixon goes to China' shattered the façade of Communist unity and dug the United States out of the hole it found itself in at the end of the 1960s. Critics have seen Nixon and Kissinger's policy as morally compromised, but was it actually the key to America's victory in the Cold War? Niall Ferguson is Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2010-11. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:06

The Third World's War

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Michael Cox This event was recorded on 24 November 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building Although never a "hot" war between the superpowers, the Cold War was waged partly through a series of proxy wars in Third World countries from Guatemala to Korea to Vietnam. Although a great deal of attention has been devoted to a select number of U.S. Interventions in the Third World, there is an urgent need to see the "Third World's War" in perspective, showing how successful the Soviet Union was in pursuing a strategy of fomenting revolution and how consistently successive U.S. administrations behaved in response. Professor Niall Ferguson is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2010-2011 academic year. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
03:54

State of Emergency: The Way We Were, Britain 1970-1974

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Dominic Sandbrook Chair: Maurice Fraser This event was recorded on 27 October 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building The beginning of the 1970s saw Britain tottering on the brink of an abyss. Yet this time of immense unrest was also one of astonishing creativity and innovation, which helped shape society as we know it today. For perhaps the last time in our history Britain experienced the shock of the new, from celebrity footballers and the pornography boom to high street curry houses and foreign holidays. Dominic Sandbrook was born in Shropshire in 1974, an indirect result of the Heath government's three-day week giving couples more leisure time. Formerly a history lecturer at Sheffield and fellow of the Rothermere Institute, University of Oxford, he is now a well-known author, commentator and broadcaster. This event celebrates the publication of his new book, State of Emergency: The Way We Were, Britain 1970-1974. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
03:46

The Political Economy of the Cold War

Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 October 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building At its heart the Cold War was a competition between two economic systems. Despite having in common a "military-industrial complex", they were profoundly different in the degree of freedom they offered their citizens, the living standards they were able to achieve and the pace of technological innovation they could sustain. In this first lecture, Niall Ferguson compares and contrasts the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War and asks how far the outcome of the Cold War was economically determined from the outset. In particular, what role did commercial and financial globalisation play in enhancing U.S. power in the world? And how serious a threat did inflation pose to the United States in the 1970s? Professor Niall Ferguson is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2010-2011 academic year. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9

May 05 2011

01:18

LSE: Public Lectures and Events - The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death

Speaker: Professor John Gray Chair: Dr Simon Glendinning This event was recorded on 19 February 2011 in Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century science became the vehicle for an assault on death. The power of knowledge was summoned to free humans of their mortality. Science was used against science and became a channel for faith. John Gray is most recently the acclaimed author of Black Mass: Apocalyptic Religion and the Death of Utopia, and Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm
01:11

LSE: Public Lectures and Events - The End of Remembering

Speaker: Joshua Foer Chair: Professor Helena Cronin This event was recorded on 5 April 2011 in Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building Once upon a time remembering was everything. Today, we have endless mountains of documents, the Internet and ever-present smart phones to store our memories. As our culture has transformed from one that was fundamentally based on internal memories to one that is fundamentally based on memories stored outside the brain, what are the implications for ourselves and for our society? What does it mean that we've lost our memory? Joshua Foer studied evolutionary biology at Yale University and is now a freelance science journalist, writing for the National Geographic and New York Times among others. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm

March 03 2011

22:22

Public Lectures and Events: Income Distribution and Social Change after 50 years

This event was recorded on 1 March 2011 in Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House. Fifty years ago, it was believed that income inequality was falling and that poverty had largely been eliminated. This lecture returns to Richard Titmuss' masterly crossexamination of the evidence about income inequality and argues that we have much to learn, but also to add. Tony Atkinson is the centennial professor at LSE. His most recent book is Top Incomes: a global perspective. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm
22:21

Public Lectures and Events: The Haves and Have Nots

This event was recorded on 8 February 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building. Inequality is a surprisingly slippery issue, involving not just straightforward comparisons of individuals, but also comparisons of price and consumption differences around the world – and over time. In this lecture Branko Milanovic, the lead economist at the World Bank's research division, will approach the issue in a new and innovative way, focusing on inequality in income and wealth in different time periods and contexts: from inequality in Roman times (and how it compared with inequality today), to depictions of wealth inequality in literature (Pride and Prejudice and Anna Karenina), to inequality across generations of a single family (the three generations of Obamas illustrating this theme). As for global inequality today, the talk will examine its main cause (differences in average incomes between countries), the role China and India might play, and, perhaps most importantly, whether global inequality matters at all, and if does, what can we do to reduce it. Branko Milanovic is one of the world's leading experts on inequality. He is lead economist at the World Bank's research division in Washington DC, a visiting fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, and the author of The Haves and Have Nots: A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm

January 17 2011

10:37

LSE Lecture: Facing Disaster In the Middle East: Do We Have Only Bad Options?—Stephen Kinzer

Tags: lse
10:00

LSE Lecture: The Meaning of Life—Robert Rowland Smith

Tags: lse

January 13 2011

12:20

The Moral Importance of the Difference between the Unity of the Individual and the Separateness of Persons: Dr Alex Voorhoeve at the LSE

Individual lives have a unity that the lives of separate individuals do not. This truism has radical, and not fully appreciated, implications for distributive ethics. Alex Voorhoeve is senior lecturer in philosophy at LSE's Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method.
12:19

Politics, Power, Cities: Enrique Peñalosa at the LSE

Enrique Peñalosa, former Mayor of Bogotá and one of the world's most challenging urban thinkers, describes the urgent need for governments to create socially inclusive and well-designed transport systems, public spaces and cities. Addressing mobility, public space, equity, quality of life and social inclusion, Peñalosa will propose that inequality and exclusion are the main causes of the problems that affect cities in developing countries, particularly issues relating to mobility and sustainability. Enrique Peñalosa was mayor of Bogotá, 1998-2001, and now acts as a consultant on urban vision. His advisory work concentrates on sustainability, mobility, equity, public space and quality of life. From http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm

January 12 2011

11:54

Valuing the Humanities

Professor James Ladyman, Professor Martha Nussbaum, Lord Rees of Ludlow, Richard Smith at the LSE, a public debate hosted by the Forum of European Philosophy From http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm

December 20 2010

11:00

Malinowski Lecture: Rane Willerslev, "Frazer Strikes Back From The Armchair"

This event was recorded on 13 May 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building The question which runs throughout this talk can be stated in stark form: is it a mistake to take our interest in an ethnographic phenomenon in the direction of an empirical investigation, when what is really needed with respect to its clarity is an imaginative contemplation of it? It is my overall argument that this is indeed the case and that the Malinowskian recourse to empirical evidence as the ultimate criterion for anthropological knowledge is misguided. Some phenomena dealt with by anthropologists are beyond empirical experience. As examples, I take two classical topics - the ‘soul’ and ‘ritual blood sacrifice’. I will show how both are essentially metaphysical issues, not empirical ones. Understanding them, therefore, is not a question of advancement in the actual material practice of fieldwork, but of the power of the scholar's speculative imagination. This finds an echo in Frazer, the last survivor of the old ‘armchair school’. His style of anthropology was marked by a deliberate speculative interrogation of ethnography - a process whereby abstract thinking gives force and meaning to ethnographic observations. Event listing: http://goo.gl/hUNpA

December 05 2010

06:42

Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk among Us — John Quiggin at the LSE

The recent financial crisis laid bare many of the assumptions behind market liberalism--the theory that market-based solutions are always best, regardless of the problem. For decades, their advocates dominated mainstream economics, and their influence created a system where an unthinking faith in markets led many to view speculative investments as fundamentally safe. The crisis seemed to have killed off these ideas, but they still live on in the minds of many-- even some of those charged with cleaning up the mess. John Quiggin explains how these dead ideas still walk among us--and why we must find a way to kill them once and for all if we are to avoid an even bigger financial crisis in the future. John Quiggin is professor of economics at the University of Queensland in Australia. From http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm
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