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October 15 2013

15:30

Product Excellence Principles

LukeW Ideation + Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design. There is no single process that will produce great results for every company, but there are tried-and-true principles that can guide teams in the right direction. Through vivid stories, Luke will showcase several of these principles in action, including: - Thinking "outside in" using customer insights to innovate - Speaking with "one voice" despite having many stakeholders - Defining the core essence of the product you're bringing to life - Building outward from this center point - Committing to greatness and making the time - Understanding when to putt and when to drive the ball forward http://www.lukew.com/presos/preso.asp?10

August 14 2012

16:46

LukeW | Audio: Designing Multi-Device Experiences

LukeW Ideation + Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design. http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1608&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FunctioningForm+%28LukeW+Ideation+%2B+Design%29
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04:05

March 17 2012

17:25

Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

UX designer Amber Case will share insights from her research in cyborg anthropology and talk about what really makes us human. Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist currently working at Vertigo Software. She founded CyborgCamp, a conference on the future of humans and computers. Her main focus is on mobile software, augmented reality and data visualization, as these reduce the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect with information. Case founded Geoloqi.com, a private location sharing application, out of a frustration with existing social protocols around text messaging and wayfinding. She formerly worked at global advertising agency. In 2010, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the Most Influential Women in Tech. http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP992057
17:14

Teaching Touch: Tapworthy Touchscreen Design

Discover the rules of thumb for finger-friendly design. Touch gestures are sweeping away buttons, menus and windows from mobile devices—and even from the next version of Windows. Find out why those familiar desktop widgets are weak replacements for manipulating content directly, and learn to craft touchscreen interfaces that effortlessly teach users new gesture vocabularies. The challenge: gestures are invisible, without the visual cues offered by buttons and menus. As your touchscreen app sheds buttons, how do people figure out how to use the damn thing? Learn to lead your audience by the hand (and fingers) with practical techniques that make invisible gestures obvious. Designer Josh Clark (author of O'Reilly books "Tapworthy" and "Best iPhone Apps") mines a variety of surprising sources for interface inspiration and design patterns. Along the way, discover the subtle power of animation, why you should be playing lots more video games, and why a toddler is your best beta tester. Josh Clark, Principal, Global Moxie I'm a designer specializing in mobile design strategy and user experience. I'm author of the O'Reilly books "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps" and "Best iPhone Apps." My outfit Global Moxie offers consulting services and training to help media companies, design agencies, and creative organizations build tapworthy mobile apps and effective websites. Before the interwebs swallowed me up, I worked on a slew of national PBS programs at Boston's WGBH. I shared my three words of Russian with Mikhail Gorbachev, strolled the ranch with Nancy Reagan, hobnobbed with Rockefellers, and wrote trivia questions for a primetime game show. In 1996, I created the uberpopular "Couch-to-5K" (C25K) running program, which has helped millions of skeptical would-be exercisers take up jogging. (My motto for fitness is the same for user experience: no pain, no pain.) http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10988

June 21 2011

14:00

May 28 2011

08:24

Human-Machine Interface -- Groks Science Show 2004-03-03 : Charles Lee and Frank Ling : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

The Macintosh computer recently celebrated its twentieth anniversary, but the history of this computer goes back a little further. On the program, Jef Raskin, creator of the Apple Macintosh, discussed the human-machine interface.

January 17 2011

23:31

By Design - 2011-01-05 - Chris Bangle

Chris Bangle: global car designer and ideas agitator Do you know this name, Chris Bangle? Car enthusiasts in the By Design audience will know him, in the world of car design he's a star, but all of you know his work. Trends and Products: Pixel building - the greenest in Australia The Pixel building, as it is known, is the new Melbourne city headquarters for the developers Grocon - known for many of Australia´s major buildings. Eureka building on Melbourne´s Southbank is one of their most prominent. This is considered one of the tallest buildings in Australia. The Pixel building, though, is small, and an experiment in all things green. The building´s architects Studio 505 are one of Australia´s most innovative and thoughtful firms, with the co-founder Dylan Brady coming out of LAB Architecture, the firm that designed Melbourne's Federation Square. Wallpaper: an on-again, off-again love affair On his deathbed in a Paris hotel room, Oscar Wilde famously quipped: 'My wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. One or the other of us has to go.' In Australia, since the 1840s, fashions in wallpaper have come and gone in Australia during our long, on-off love affair with wallpaper. When the Lights Went Out: a history of blackouts in America Where were you when the lights went out? For whatever reason they went out, you´ll probably remember where you were when it happened because our electrically lit-up life has become so natural to us that when the lights go off, the darkness seems abnormal and memorable.

November 06 2010

22:11

Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions. In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form. Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five: * Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior. * Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions. * Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications. * Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization. * Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them. Christian then describes five practices: * Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves. * Create social objects that give people context for interaction. * Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders. * Enable a bridge to real life. * Let the community elevate people and the content they value. Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples: * The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful. * Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply. * The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene. * The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other. * The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally. Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works. http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html
21:06

Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions. In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form. Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five: * Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior. * Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions. * Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications. * Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization. * Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them. Christian then describes five practices: * Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves. * Create social objects that give people context for interaction. * Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders. * Enable a bridge to real life. * Let the community elevate people and the content they value. Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples: * The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful. * Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply. * The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene. * The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other. * The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally. Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works. http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html

November 01 2010

07:37

Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions. In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form. Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five: * Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior. * Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions. * Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications. * Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization. * Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them. Christian then describes five practices: * Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves. * Create social objects that give people context for interaction. * Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders. * Enable a bridge to real life. * Let the community elevate people and the content they value. Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples: * The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful. * Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply. * The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene. * The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other. * The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally. Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works. http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html
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