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June 07 2011

04:14

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 January 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building 'Nixon goes to China' shattered the façade of Communist unity and dug the United States out of the hole it found itself in at the end of the 1960s. Critics have seen Nixon and Kissinger's policy as morally compromised, but was it actually the key to America's victory in the Cold War? Niall Ferguson is Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2010-11. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:06

The Third World's War

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Michael Cox This event was recorded on 24 November 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building Although never a "hot" war between the superpowers, the Cold War was waged partly through a series of proxy wars in Third World countries from Guatemala to Korea to Vietnam. Although a great deal of attention has been devoted to a select number of U.S. Interventions in the Third World, there is an urgent need to see the "Third World's War" in perspective, showing how successful the Soviet Union was in pursuing a strategy of fomenting revolution and how consistently successive U.S. administrations behaved in response. Professor Niall Ferguson is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2010-2011 academic year. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
03:46

The Political Economy of the Cold War

Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 October 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building At its heart the Cold War was a competition between two economic systems. Despite having in common a "military-industrial complex", they were profoundly different in the degree of freedom they offered their citizens, the living standards they were able to achieve and the pace of technological innovation they could sustain. In this first lecture, Niall Ferguson compares and contrasts the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War and asks how far the outcome of the Cold War was economically determined from the outset. In particular, what role did commercial and financial globalisation play in enhancing U.S. power in the world? And how serious a threat did inflation pose to the United States in the 1970s? Professor Niall Ferguson is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2010-2011 academic year. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
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