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December 11 2013

16:18

Megatons To Megawatts: Russian Warheads Fuel U.S. Power Plants : NPR

Once the Cold War ended, much of Russia's surplus uranium from thousands of decommissioned weapons wound up in crumbling military facilities. In 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy made a deal to have the material converted to fuel for U.S. power plants. The last shipment arrives today. http://www.npr.org/2013/12/11/250007526/megatons-to-megawatts-russian-warheads-fuel-u-s-power-plants

June 25 2013

23:22
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August 18 2012

16:45

Stuff You Should Know

Did Reagan's Star Wars Program Win the Cold War? -- Putting lasers in space to blast Soviet missiles out of the air was a real part of Ronald Reagan's defense policy. While his "Star Wars" program was derided at home and abroad, historians are beginning to wonder if it didn't help win the Cold War.

September 14 2011

17:14

Berlin 1961

In June 1961, Nikita Khrushchev called Berlin "the most dangerous place on earth." American and Soviet fighting men and tanks stood only yards apart. Frederick Kempe talks about what made Berlin so dangerous. His book Berlin 1961 is based on a wealth of new documents and interviews, filled with fresh insights, and is a masterly look at key events of the 20th century, with powerful applications to these early years of the 21st century.

June 07 2011

04:40

Nuclear Arms and Human Rights

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Michael Cox This event was recorded on 1 March 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building The decisive breakthroughs in the Cold War occurred in seemingly unrelated fields – nuclear arms control and human rights. But was the collapse of communism a reflection of imperial overstretch or the result of liberal aspirations for freedom? This event celebrates the publication of Professor Ferguson's new book Civilization: The West and the Rest. Niall Ferguson is Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2010-11. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:20

LSE Literary Festival 2011 - Through the Soviet Looking-Glass

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Francis Spufford Chair: Professor Janet Hartley This event was recorded on 19 February 2011 in Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building At first sight, the USSR of the 1950s and 1960s is a formidably remote and strange place for an early 21st-century western observer to try to inhabit: ideological, materially alien, suffused with obsolete expectations, and operating in its daily life and economic life according to rules that eerily reverse our own. But the reward for crossing this particular imaginative border, argues Francis Spufford, is the discovery, in the mirrorworld of the Soviet Union, of deeply recognisable human behaviour, and deeply familiar human hopes. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
04:14

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE

Public Lectures and Events: podcasts - Podcasts - LSE Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 January 2011 in Old Theatre, Old Building 'Nixon goes to China' shattered the façade of Communist unity and dug the United States out of the hole it found itself in at the end of the 1960s. Critics have seen Nixon and Kissinger's policy as morally compromised, but was it actually the key to America's victory in the Cold War? Niall Ferguson is Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs at LSE IDEAS for 2010-11. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
03:46

The Political Economy of the Cold War

Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson Chair: Professor Arne Westad This event was recorded on 18 October 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building At its heart the Cold War was a competition between two economic systems. Despite having in common a "military-industrial complex", they were profoundly different in the degree of freedom they offered their citizens, the living standards they were able to achieve and the pace of technological innovation they could sustain. In this first lecture, Niall Ferguson compares and contrasts the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War and asks how far the outcome of the Cold War was economically determined from the outset. In particular, what role did commercial and financial globalisation play in enhancing U.S. power in the world? And how serious a threat did inflation pose to the United States in the 1970s? Professor Niall Ferguson is the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs for the 2010-2011 academic year. http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/publicLecturesAndEvents.htm#generated-subheading9
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