Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

January 21 2014

09:50

Who’s Afraid Of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street’

“The Wolf of Wall Street” is making waves well beyond its Academy Award nominations. We’ll catch the controversy.

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the Martin Scorese film,

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the new Martin Scorsese film, “The Wolf Of Wall Street.” (Paramount Pictures)

Guests

David Edelstein, chief film critic for New York Magazine. Film critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air” and CBS’ “This Morning.”

Issac Chotiner, senior editor at The New Republic. (@IChotiner)

Joel Cohen, prosecutor with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

Sam Polk, founder and executive director of Groceryships. Former Wall Street trader. (@SamPolk)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wrap: War Over ‘Wolf of Wall Street’: Scorsese’s Latest Ignites Online Brouhaha — “The donnybrook that has emerged online, however, covers much broader ground: Is Scorsese, some viewers ask, satirizing the outrageous behavior he’s portraying onscreen, or is he celebrating it? Belfort, after all, gets off (spoiler alert) with a slap on the wrist for his crimes, and the film never takes a pronounced stance regarding Belfort and his colleagues bilking their clients out of millions of dollars.”

L.A. Weekly: An Open Letter to the Makers of The Wolf of Wall Street, and the Wolf Himself — “As an 18-year-old, I had no idea what was going on. But then again, did anyone? Certainly your investors didn’t – and they were left holding the bag when you cashed out your holdings and got rich off their money. So Marty and Leo, while you glide through press junkets and look forward to awards season, let me tell you the truth – what happened to my mother, my two sisters and me.”

New York Times: For the Love of Money –”I wanted a billion dollars. It’s staggering to think that in the course of five years, I’d gone from being thrilled at my first bonus — $40,000 — to being disappointed when, my second year at the hedge fund, I was paid ‘only’ $1.5 million.”

January 02 2014

07:11

The 2014 U.S. Economic Outlook

We take on the economic outlook for 2014, the new year ahead. We’ll look at what’s working, what’s not and what’s coming for the US economy.

A trader wears glasses celebrating the new year while working on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013. (AP)

A trader wears glasses celebrating the new year while working on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013. (AP)

Guests

Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Analytics. Author of “Paying the Price: Ending the Great Recession and Beginning a New American Century” and “Financial Shock: A 360º Look at the Subprime Mortgage Implosion, and How to Avoid the Next Financial Crisis.” (@dismalscientist)

Heidi Moore, U.S. finance and economics editor for The Guardian. (@moorehn)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Guardian: Global economy set to grow faster in 2014, with less risk of sudden shocks – “The threat, for example, of a eurozone implosion, another government shutdown or debt-ceiling fight in the US, a hard landing in China, or a war between Israel and Iran over nuclear proliferation, will be far more subdued. Still, most advanced economies (the US, the eurozone, Japan, the UK, Australia, and Canada) will barely reach potential growth, or will remain below it.”

Moody’s Analytics: U.S. Macro Outlook 2014: A Breakout Year? — “Preconditions are in place for much stronger economic growth in 2014. The path won’t be straight up, and significant hurdles remain, including Congress’ budget battles and the winding down of the Fed’s bond-buying program. But the U.S. economy’s fundamentals are strong.”

Wall Street Journal: Winners of 2013: Boring Investors — “In the best year for U.S. stocks since 1995, the smart way to play the markets has been to follow the dumb money. So-called dumb-money strategies, which involve buying and holding a plain-vanilla portfolio of U.S. stocks, did much better than the more complex approaches employed by hedge funds and other professional investors.”

Sponsored post
soup-sponsored
12:34
5371 6093 500
rockyourmind, foods, 2010-2020.

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish.
Reposted fromRockYourMind RockYourMind

December 05 2013

07:12

On His Way Out, Gary Gensler Leaves A Cleaner Wall Street

Gary Gensler is a hero to those who call for a crackdown on Wall Street. “Arch-enemy” to those who don’t. He’s leaving his top watchdog  job, and sits with us for an exit interview.

Guests

Jesse Eisinger, Pulitzer Prize-winning financial reporter for ProPublica. (@EisingerJ)

Gary Gensler, outgoing chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. (@CFTC)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Gensler’s Record: Achievements and Disappointments — “Mr. Gensler began his tenure amid an economic meltdown sparked in large part by the implosion of parts of the derivatives market. Large firms with complex ties to the financial system such as American International Group Inc. and Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. suffered devastating losses on bad bets on derivatives, which nearly caused the financial system to collapse. The 2010 Dodd-Frank law was designed by Congress to ward off the threat of such a collapse by the meltdown of too-big-to-fail companies.”

Washington Post: Gary Gensler explains how financial reform is going — “On Oct. 2, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) oversaw the launch of ‘swap execution facility’ platforms. Called the ‘future of derivatives trading’ by Bloomberg, these platforms are the culmination of reforms in Dodd-Frank designed to bring price transparency to the opaque and dark over-the-counter derivatives market that helped cause the financial crisis. And, unlike the health-care exchanges in Obamacare, these electronic platforms launched without any notable problems.”

Bloomberg: Wall Street May Take Derivatives Regulator to Court — “The financial industry’s trade groups have consulted with lawyers about how to block Gensler’s final moves, according to four people briefed on the matter. A lawsuit would probably be focused on CFTC guidance issued in July that described when the agency should defer its rules in favor of regulations by foreign derivatives overseers, the people said. Gensler, 56, has fought a five-year battle with the industry over how to draw up a safer and more open marketplace for derivatives, the products that helped push the world economy to the precipice in 2008.”

November 05 2013

21:28

#TwitterIPO: Your Tweets From Our Twitter Hour

Our Nov. 5 hour exploring the coming launch of social media giant Twitter’s Initial Public Offering (or IPO) asked you, our listeners and online followers, for input on what value you see in the service. We got a pretty broad range of responses.

Have more to say? Let us know in the comments below, or tell us on Facebook, Tumblr and — of course — @OnPointRadio.

15:00

Taking Stock Of Twitter’s IPO

Twitter’s big IPO – the buzz, the billions and assessing the value of an empire of tweets.

Seems like five minutes ago, Twitter was sort of a joke. This week, it’s a big IPO. A public stock offering on the New York Stock Exchange that will value Twitter at over $10 billion. The company with the funny name that introduced us all to tweets and hash tags and 140-character messages is riding a wave or a bubble, depending how you see it. Hoping to raise a lot of cash without taking the kind of dive Facebook did after its sky-high IPO. All the attention is lighting up social media and where it’s headed. Our always-on web life. Up next On Point: #TwitterIPO, and where Twitter takes us.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Zach Seward, senior editor of Atlantic Media’s online business news magazine, Quartz. (@ZSeward)

Rob Armstrong, head of Lex, the Financial Times’ opinion and analysis column. (@rbrtrmstrng)

Jennifer Van Grove, social media reporter at CNet. (jbruin">@jbruin)

From Tom’s Reading List

Quartz: What Twitter’s IPO Means –  ”People will call it a bubble, but they’re generally talking finance, as in the reason Pinterest and Snapchat are now worth $4 billion apiece. What I see is a social bubble, the collective delusion that Twitter’s IPO is a celebratory event, even if you’re not one of the few actually holding a stake in the company.”

CNet: Boobs and banner ads: Twitter’s Facebook dilemma — “At their worst, Twitter ads now resemble banner ads. Yet instead of being relegated to the right-hand side of a Web page, the ads are popping up in the stream on desktop and mobile. The brand-appeal, however, is that a company can pay to promote a tweet to a wider audience and use the power of an in-line photograph to make a stronger impact. Take Victoria’s Secret, for instance, which recently ran a Promoted Tweet with an image of a scantily clad model whose boobs, which would have previously been hidden from view until a person clicked to view them, ran through the timelines of a wide-eyed audience.”

New York Times: Twitter Raises Price Range for Its I.P.O. – “But coming ahead of pricing for the company’s stock, the higher price range suggests Twitter is emboldened after the conclusion of its road show. Thanks to the strong demand for its stock, Twitter is planning to close the order books for its I.P.O. on Tuesday at noon, a day earlier than scheduled, according to people familiar with the matter. Twitter still plans to price on Wednesday and begin trading on Thursday.”

Playlist

March 17 2012

00:35

Fictional Thriller Tackles Dangers of High-Frequency Trading | PBS NewsHour | March 15, 2012 | PBS

Part of his series on Making $ense of financial news, economics correspondent Paul Solman spoke with author Robert Harris whose fictional take on Wall Street, "The Fear Index," stresses the dangers of algorithm-driven, high-frequency trading.

May 08 2011

01:46

Gabfest

Become a fan of the Political Gabfest on Facebook. We post to the Facebook page throughout the week, so keep the conversation going by joining us there. http://www.slate.com/id/2292575

November 16 2010

01:15

Caustic Soda: Greed

In the 2nd part of our "Seven Deadly Sins" series, Chris “Sword of the Stars” Stewart joins us to discuss the fourth circle of Hell, Marcu Licinius Crassus’ realty schemes, El Dorado, war profiteering, Ponzi schemes, Ford & the nazis, Wall Street, Uncle Scrooge and the poor little rich boy.

September 24 2010

21:05

The New “Wall Street” Film

Michael Douglas is back as Gordon Gekko in "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.” We see if greed is still good.

September 05 2010

21:09
21:07

June 08 2010

14:00

Elizabeth Warren, Consumer Crusader

Middle class crusader and scourge to fat-cat bankers, Elizabeth Warren, on what Washington needs to do to protect Americans. We present a special broadcast.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.
(PRO)
No Soup for you

Don't be the product, buy the product!

close
YES, I want to SOUP ●UP for ...