Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

October 26 2013

21:32

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

We usually associate fish sauce with Southeast Asian cooking. But it turns out the briny condiment also has deep roots in Europe, dating back to the Roman Empire. What caused its decline? Historians say it boils down to taxes, and pirates.

October 08 2013

15:31

Pasta Recipes From Jen Lin-Liu

On Oct. 8, we had author Jen Lin-Liu on to tell the story behind her book, “On The Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome, With Love and Pasta.” She also brought our guest host Jane Clayson some delicious manta and tortellini to taste on air. You can make those pasta dishes from both the East and West yourself — Jen Lin-Liu’s recipes are below.

Manta (Central Asian Dumplings)

Makes 5-6 servings

For the wrappers:

5 cups all-purpose flour

1 egg white

1 tablespoon salt

2 cups water

 

For the filling:

1 pound ground lamb or finely diced pumpkin

3 white onions, minced

1 tablespoon cumin

1 tablespoon black pepper

2 tablespoons salt

if using pumpkin: 1 tablespoon sugar

Accompaniment:

Clotted sheep’s cream (substitute: marscapone cheese)

In a large bowl, combine flour, salt, egg white, and mix with your hands. Add the water slowly while mixing, and after the water is fully incorporated, knead the dough for 3-5 minutes until it becomes a smooth mound. Cover with a cloth and let it rest for half an hour.

While the dough is resting, in a separate bowl, combine the ingredients for the filling.

After the dough has rested, break off about a quarter and divide the quarter into two pieces. Roll each piece into a long rope 1-inch in diameter. With a knife or your hand, cut or break the rope into smaller pieces about 1-inch long each. Roll each piece into a ball and flatten into a circle with your palm. With a rolling pin, roll out each piece of dough into a thin circle larger than your palm.

Dust a cutting board with flour. With the wrapper resting in your palm, place two tablespoons of filling into the center of the wrapper. Pinch together the edges of the dumpling so that the filling is completely sealed and the dumpling takes on an oblong shape. Place on the cutting board and repeat the wrapping process with the remaining dumpling skins. Break off another quarter of the dough, and repeat the rolling and wrapping process, before moving on to another batch until all the dough and filling is gone.

Place a dozen dumplings in the steamer insert over a pot and steam for 20 minutes. Repeat with the remaining dumplings, working in batches of a dozen. Serve immediately with clotted sheep’s cream or marscapone cheese.

 

Manti (Turkish Dumplings)

Makes 5-6 servings

4 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups water

1 recipe’s worth of Manti Filling

1 recipe’s worth of Manti Yogurt Sauce

1 bunch scallions, white parts only, chopped into thin rings

1/2 cup butter

1 tablespoon paprika

¼ cup chopped walnuts

Place the flour in a large bowl. Stir in 1 cup of water and work the water into the flour with your hands. Slowly add more water, about ¼ cup at a time, mixing thoroughly so the water is fully incorporated before adding more. Stop when the dough is springy and soft, the texture of Play-Doh. Transfer to a clean surface and knead for 3 to 5 minutes. Cover with a damp cloth and let sit for at least 30 minutes.

Divide the dough in half and return one half underneath the damp cloth. Place the other half on a clean, dry, sturdy, large surface sprinkled with flour and knead for several minutes. Flatten the dough with your hands into a circle and roll out with the rolling pin until it is 1-2mm in thickness.

Cut the flattened dough into 3/4-inch squares. Working with one square at a time, place a tiny amount of filling in the center of the dough, bring diagonal corners together to make a triangle and press together the edges to seal the filling. Bring the opposite sides of the triangle together and press them together. Repeat with each square. When finished wrapping all the dumplings, roll out the other half of the dough and repeat the cutting and wrapping process with the rest of the squares.

Bring 2 quarts of water to boil in a large stockpot. Add half the scallion rings. Boil the dumplings in batches, about a quarter at time, for 4-5 minutes.

In a large frying pan, melt half butter on medium heat, add half the paprika and half the walnuts. Add half of the boiled dumplings, toss, and divide between several pasta plates. Repeat this step with the rest of the dumplings and serve immediately, garnishing each plate with scallions and Manti Yogurt Sauce.

Manti Filling: mix 1 pound ground lamb (or beef), ½ cup minced yellow onions, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper.

Manti Yogurt Sauce: mix 1 cup of yogurt, several minced garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon chopped mint, and 1 teaspoon ground chili pepper.

 

Tortelloni

Makes 4 servings

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour

3 eggs

½ pound ricotta cheese

½ cup grated parmigiano-reggino cheese, plus extra for garnish

1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

2 cloves minced garlic

1 egg

¼ cup water

1 dozen fresh sage leaves

½ stick butter

 

Heap flour on a large, flat surface and and make a well in the center. Break the eggs into the well and beat them with a fork, until all the flour has been incorporated and the dough is soft, pliable, and smooth. Let the dough rest, covered, for 30 minutes.

In a medium bowl, mix together ricotta cheese, parmigiano-reggino cheese, parsley, garlic and egg.

Divide the dough in half. Working with one half at a time (covering the unused portion of dough), knead the dough briefly, then flatten and stretch it with your hands into a rectangle. Sprinkle the dough with flour and flatten the dough with a rolling pin until it is about 2 milimeters thick. (For more detailed instructions, please see p. 96-97 of On the Noodle Road.)

Cut the dough into 2-inch squares. Place a bit of cheese filling in the center of each square, bring diagonal corners together and pinch the edges together to make a sealed triangle. Bring the opposite edges of the triangle together and press firmly. Repeat the wrapping procees with the rest of the dough.

Boil the tortelloni for 3-4 minutes, drain through a collander and set aside.

Bring ¼ cup water to boil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add sage leaves torn into pieces and reduce the heat to low, simmering the leaves for 3-4 minutes. Add butter and allow it to melt. Stir in the tortellini and toss in the butter-sage sauce. Garnish with extra parmigiano and serve immediately.

(Recipes courtesy Jen Lin-Liu)

Sponsored post
feedback2020-admin
20:51
04:05

One Woman’s Global Quest For The Origins Of Pasta

Noodle-mania. We track the birth story of a staple from China to Italy. Its savory history.

Guest

Jen Lin-Liu, author of “On The Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome, With Love and Pasta.” Also the author of “Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China” and founder of Black Sesame Kitchen in Beijing.

From Tom’s Reading List

Seattle Times: “On Noodle Road”: The Winding Road of Pasta’s History — “She got the idea during a noodle-making class in Rome, where she was struck by the similarities between Italian and Chinese pastas; she decided to retrace the ancient Silk Road in hope of finding out how noodles first made their way to Italy. She quickly debunks the myth that Marco Polo was responsible: Pasta figured in Italian diets long before the Venetian ever headed east. Her quest takes her through China, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Iran and Turkey and finally back to Rome. A Chinese-American chef and food writer who started a cooking school in Beijing, she trades her culinary skills with other women she meets along the way.”

NPR: Wandering Appetites: Hunting The Elusive Noodle – “Along her journey, Lin-Liu eats and eats. Meals are her bartering currency, and as she progresses she swaps Chinese for Uighur, Central Asian, Persian, and Turkish. Ancient customs of hospitality prevail on even the most destitute stretches of the Silk Road: Complete strangers slaughter a sheep to celebrate the visit of Lin-Liu and her husband, and meals often turn into Pantagruelian lists: ‘flatbread,’ ‘yogurt with diced eggplant,’ ‘red pepper dip,’ ‘cold wild greens,’ ‘soup with garlic scapes,’ ‘lamb meatballs,’ lamb tripe stuffed with lamb, okra, and so on.”

Bon Appetit: Interview With Jen Lin-Liu, Author – “Dumplings were probably the biggest thread I saw along the way, the Chinese evolving into Central Asian manti to Turkish manti, which are much smaller, to actual tortellini, and some historians have theorized that, because you could wrap these little packages of food and the filling could be varied, this was a food that nomads can make very easily and then just boil on the road. There’s no sort of concrete explanation of how these dumplings moved all the way across the Silk Road, but some theorize that the Mongolians under Genghis Khan, who went all the way from Japan and Korea to Eastern Europe, somehow brought these dumplings with them along with the conquests.”

Read An Excerpt From “On The Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome, With Love and Pasta.”

Tags: Books Food

October 07 2013

18:01

The Enright Files - Food | CBC Ideas

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, The Enright Files explores our increasingly complicated and self-conscious relationship with food: from the proliferation of movements like locavorism to anxieties about what's in our food, how it's produced and what it's doing to our bodies. Michael Enright speaks with two maverick thinkers on food: Thomas Pawlick, the author of The End of Food, and Gary Taubes, the author of Why We Get Fat. Source: http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/2013/10/07/the-enright-files---food-1/
Tags: cbc ideas food

September 19 2013

06:01

A Taste of the Past - Episode 71 - Eat Your Words: A Culinary History of the English Language

What do beat, bean, and leek all have in common with each other? Find out on this week's episode A Taste of The Past where Linda goes into the history of food and culinary etymology with Ina Lipkowitz teacher of English literature and Biblical Studies at MIT and author of Words to Eat By. Discover the semantic shift in the word meat, the influence of the ancient Romans on plant breeds, and how much religious symbolism is based off food. Listen and become aware about how much food words have an impact on us. This episode is sponsored by The Hearst Ranch. http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/1752-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-71-Eat-Your-Words-A-Culinary-History-of-the-English-Language
05:58

A Taste of the Past - Episode 140 - A History of Food in 100 Recipes

William Sitwell, author of A History of Food in 100 Recipes, joins Linda Pelaccio for this week's episode of A Taste of the Past to talk about the evolution of the food industry over hundreds of years. Tune in to hear William talk about the initiation of fast food and supermarkets, and how the idea of self-service mechanized the business of eating. From Mesopotamia to Mario Batali, William highlights and reproduces important recipes in order to transport the reader to specific time periods. How do different foods denote status? Learn about William's literary lineage, and how that inspired his writing. How did William decide to outline his book, and why does food history research require primary sources? Find out all of this and more on this week's edition of A Taste of the Past! Thanks to our sponsor, Hearst Ranch, and thanks to Plexophonic for today's break music. 'Food is a wonderful subject for journalists because it touches on so many aspects of everyone's lives.' [3:30] -- William Sitwell on A Taste of the Past http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/4363-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-140-A-History-of-Food-in-100-Recipes

September 05 2013

15:00

On The Trail Of The World’s Greatest Cheese

Michael Paterniti wrote about driving cross-country with Einstein’s brain. Now he’s on the trail of the world’s greatest piece of cheese. He joins us.

Michael Paterniti, it turns out, can write about anything.  Cambodia, Kabul, driving around with Einstein’s brain in a Tupperware bowl.

In his latest book, The Telling Room, he’s writing about the world’s greatest piece of cheese, up country in a cave in Spain.  But it’s really about much more.  About slowing down.  Telling long stories.  Doing one thing incredibly well just for the passion of it, the deep feel and history in it.

About memory and love… and betrayal and revenge.

This hour, On Point:  Michael Paterniti and the story of a magnificent obsession in a piece of cheese.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guest

Michael Paterniti, author of “The Telling Room: A Tale of Love, Betrayal, Revenge, and the World’s Greatest Piece of Cheese.” (@mikepaterniti)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Boston Globe: ‘The Telling Room’ by Michael Paterniti – “This book could make you fat. It is a tale about cheese and will make you hungry for cheese. But, it is also about pleasure and the past. In the figure of Ambrosio Molinos de Las Heras, the wine-savoring master Castilian cheese maker at the heart of it, Michael Paterniti has found a man whose life story is a lesson in the dangers of combining these two things.”

The Wall Street Journal: How a Piece of Cheese Turned Into an Epic Tale – “Mr. Paterniti first learned of the cheese more than 20 years ago, as a creative writing graduate student in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He read about it in a deli newsletter that he copyedited. Years later, he traveled to Spain to taste it himself. He learned that Mr. Molinos had gone bankrupt and stopped making the cheese, despite having built a fan base that included Frank Sinatra, Ronald Reagan and Fidel Castro.”

Chicago Tribune: Review: ‘The Telling Room’ by Michael Paterniti – “Because the stuff about the cheese? About the pleasures of food and family and finding meaning in the old ways of life? That’s just the framework. What Paterniti’s really writing about is storytelling itself.”

Excerpt: ‘The Telling Room’ by Michael Paterniti

August 26 2013

12:44

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings? : The Salt : NPR

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from? Some think prehistoric people may have been cooking them up. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/26/214833891/in-the-beginning-there-were-dumplings

August 17 2013

14:15

PodOmatic | Best Free Podcasts

Today's podcast is all about joining the gym for those of you who are new to the gym it is about alleviating the fear giant hulks like Ben create about the environment where we spend our time. It is also about our mistakes we made as new users and a few tips for those of you who may need them. In short, it is the best and most hilarious podcast ever. Listen to it!!! " name="DESCRIPTION http://fitnessandbeyond.podomatic.com/entry/2013-08-08T11_46_55-07_00

August 08 2013

14:43

The 1970s Co-Op Wars | ampers

August 07 2013

09:30

The Renaissance Of American Craft Beer

With John Harwood in for Tom Ashbrook.

A look and a taste of American craft beer, in its renaissance.

Guests

Andy Crouch, author of, “Great American Craft Beer”  and “The Good Beer Guide to New England.” He is also a columnist for BeerAdvocate Magazine. (@BeerScribe)

Barnaby Struve, Vice President of 3 Floyds Brewing Company, in Munster, Indiana.

Tonya Cornett, Brewmaster at 10 Barrel Brewing Company in Bend, Oregon. She is the only woman to ever receive the Brewmaster Award at the Annual World Beer Cup competition, winning in 2008. (@Chickbrewer)

From the Reading List

Time: You’ll Never Guess Where the Nation’s Best Craft Beer Is Brewed — “The top 25 also includes the nation’s three largest craft brewers, the Boston Beer Company (maker of Samuel Adams), California’s Sierra Nevada, and Colorado’s New Belgium Brewing, ranking on TheDailyMeal’s list at #20, #10, and #6, respectively. Surely, there will be plenty of discussion concerning whether Dogfish Head is truly the nation’s best craft brewer, and what terrific craft brewers didn’t made the cut. Of the nation’s top three craft brewing states per capita (Vermont, Oregon, Montana), there is just one representative on the list: Rogues Ales, based in Portland, Ore.”

Draft Magazine: Will it fall? A look at America’s brewery boom — “Here is a picture of our brewing nation: Prolific taphouses multiply, while both upscale restaurants and corner dives add drafts and bottle lists. Those lists often feature new names, as different towns and neighborhoods—many of which never had breweries before—get their own microbreweries or brewpubs. Those that already had breweries are getting more, becoming destination areas for savvy drinkers. Meanwhile, shops are packing their shelves with more brands from near and far. More, more and more. Happy times, right? So why do the folks who make and sell this stuff seem so, well, nervous?”

The New York Times:  For Craft Brewers, New Law Opens Door to Competitive Market – “The efforts of Infamous Brewing and other craft brewers to gain a foothold in the Texas market received help this year with the biggest legislative overhaul the industry has seen in 20 years. Lawmakers this year approved legislation that allows small breweries to sell their products to customers to drink in the brewery’s tasting room. The old law prohibited any direct sales by a brewery, requiring samples to be free. Now these breweries can sell up to 5,000 barrels at in-house bars and beer gardens.”

John’s Craft Beer List

On air, guest host John Harwood is sampling:

Notch Brewing Session Ale (Ipswich, MA)
Oskar Blues Mama’s Little Yella Pils (Longmont, Colorado)
Dogfish Head Festina Peche (Milton, Delaware)
Ballast Point Brewing Sculpin IPA (San Diego, CA)
Berkshire Brewing Coffeehouse Porter (South Deerfield, MA)

00:27

July 29 2013

08:40

July 19 2013

05:14

‘Ruth Bourdain’ Revealed: Poking Fun At Foodies

Twitterverse mystery gadfly now revealed – “Ruth Bourdain” joins us to poke fun at our foodie fads.

Guests

Ruth Bourdain (aka Josh Friedland) — Josh Friedland is author of “The Food Section,” one of the longest-running culinary blogs on the web. Josh has revealed himself as the man behind the @RuthBourdain Twitter handle. Author of “Comfort Me With Offal: Ruth Bourdain’s Guide to Gastronomy.” (@ruthbourdain and @thefoodsection)

Sam Sifton, former dining editor, restaurant critic and culture editor for the New York Times. National Editor of the New York Times. (@samsifton)

From Tom’s Reading List

The New York Times: A Secret Food Satirist Comes Out of the Pantry – “It has been one of the most vexing questions facing the food world. Not who makes the best risotto, or where to forage for chanterelles, but this: Who is Ruth Bourdain?”

Los Angeles Times: Can this be the end of Ruth Bourdain? Six greatest tweets before she/he goes – “Now, Friedland says, he’s going to focus on reviving the Food Section, which he says he’s neglected while pursuing his freelance writing, the book, and his Twitter career. But before he signs off entirely, even if only temporarily, here are his six favorite Ruth Bourdain tweets — at least of those that can be published on a family website.”

Excerpt: ‘Comfort Me With Offal’

 

July 16 2013

10:38

America’s Organic Food Shortage

Farmers across the country are struggling to keep up with the high demand for organic food. Will we have to go abroad to feed our appetite ?

Guests

Mark Peters, reporter for the Wall Street Journal covering the Midwest and Great Plains. His recent article is “A Gap in the Organic Food Chain.” (@mrmmpeters)

Lynn Clarkson, president of Clarkson Grain company, which processes organic grains.

Meg Moynihan, certified organic dairy farmer at Derrydale Farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wall Street Journal: A Gap in the Organic Food Chain — “The Farm Belt isn’t going organic fast enough to keep up with surging consumer demand, forcing makers of organic foods from milk to deli meats to look abroad for key commodities while struggling to recruit skeptical farmers at home. The U.S. is the world’s largest producer and exporter of corn and soybeans, but organic supplies, which are used largely as animal feed for production of organic meat and dairy, are hard to come by here. Federal data show organic food producers are turning to China and India for organic soybeans, as total U.S. imports of those kinds of beans doubled last year and could surpass $100 million in value this year.”

CBS News: Demand for organic foods boosts industry’s sway — “The organic food industry is gaining clout on Capitol Hill, prompted by rising consumer demand and its entry into traditional farm states. But that isn’t going over well with everyone in Congress. Tensions between conventional and organic agriculture boiled over this week during a late-night House Agriculture Committee debate on a sweeping farm bill that has for decades propped up traditional crops and largely ignored organics.”

July 02 2013

04:10

The Sustainable Grill

Plus, acclaimed chef Barton Seaver is with us, taking his sustainable spin on cooking – heirloom veggies, humanely raised meats – to the grill.

Guest

Barton Seaver, author of “Where There’s Smoke: Simple, Sustainable, Delicious Grilling.” (@bartonseaver)

From Tom’s Reading List

Salt Lake City Weekly: Barbecue by the book — “As a leading authority on sustainable foods, here, Seaver turns his prowess to the grill, offering up advice on how to incorporate sustainability into our everyday culinary lives, and does it in delicious fashion with recipes such as wood-grilled snap peas with smoky aioli (yum!), chimichurri-marinated short ribs, grilled Pacific halibut with pistachio butter (double yum!) and smoked clams & mussels.”

Epicurious: Sustainable Grilling With Barton Seaver — “Seaver took some time to answer a few questions about how to get started grilling, why fall is his favorite time to grill, and gives some tips on how to grill seafood. And of course, shares several of his grilling recipes.”

Recipe: Escarole with Nectarines and Ricotta Salata

Reprinted with permission from Where There’s Smoke © 2013 by Barton Seaver, Sterling Epicure, an imprint of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 

Most recipes for escarole involve cooking it down for a long period of time over low heat to turn its bitterness into a mellow and sweet flavor. But a good-quality, young head of this lettuce can make for a sublime salad if balanced with a sweet component. In this recipe, it is grilled nectarines, which have a smoky, caramelized sweetness but also maintain some of their piercing acidity. The walnuts add a nice textural component, and the ricotta salata provides a salty punctuation.

Ricotta salata is a salted and pressed version of ricotta cheese. Both fresh goat cheese and feta cheese share its characteristics and can be substituted.

4 nectarines, pitted and cut into quarters

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

1 head escarole, trimmed of heavy stems and cut crosswise into 1-inch-wide strips

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Juice of 1 orange

1 tablespoon maple syrup (optional)

3 ounces ricotta salata

Freshly ground black pepper

Toss the nectarines with a little of the olive oil and a pinch of salt. Grill the fruit directly over the coals of a small fi re (see page 15) until they begin to soften and caramelize, 7 to 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

In a large bowl, mix the escarole, walnuts, orange juice, and remaining olive oil. Season to taste with salt and toss to combine. Taste the salad. If it is too bitter for you, add the maple syrup and toss to combine.

Arrange the grilled nectarines around the rim of a platter and place the salad in the middle. Crumble the ricotta over the salad, add a few grinds of black pepper, and serve.

Serves 4

August 10 2012

19:42

Robin Shulman, author of Eat the City, interviewed. - Slate Magazine

The popular image of New York City involves high-rise buildings, glass, and concrete, but all over the five boroughs, people grow vegetables, fish local waters, keep bees, brew beer, and make wine. While reporting her new book, Eat the City, Robin Shulman traveled all over New York, meeting people who want to make things grow. Until the early 20th century, New York was a great center of farming, brewing, and sugar refining, and that history is still present all over the city. The conversation lasts around 25 minutes. http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/the_afterword/2012/07/robin_shulman_author_of_eat_the_city_interviewed_.html

May 04 2012

15:00

The Future Of Food

On a crowded planet, it may get strange. We'll dig in.

April 11 2012

15:00

Taco USA

From Tamale Kings and Chili Queens to frozen margaritas and Taco Bell. We look at the rise of Mexican food in the USA. The whole enchilada.

February 16 2012

16:00

The World Of Beans

Protein for a crowded planet. We’ll dive into the real and humble world of beans, in all their glory.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.
(PRO)
No Soup for you

Don't be the product, buy the product!

close
YES, I want to SOUP ●UP for ...