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February 20 2014

17:09

November 12 2013

05:56

Bill De Blasio’s New New York City

New York’s new mayor Bill de Blasio won with a progressive platform. We’ll unpack the vision and reality.

Guests

Chris Smith, contribution editor at New York Magazine. (@ChrisSmithNYMag)

Ellis Henican, columnist at New York Newsday. (@Henican)

Mitra Kalita, ideas editor at Quartz. (@mitrakalita)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York: The New Mayor’s Frenemies — “[De Blasio] rose from an obscure public office to handily defeat a better-known, more experienced front-runner in the Democratic mayoral primary and then won the general election by the biggest open-seat margin ever. All very impressive. The reward is four years of nonstop headaches that will make being mocked as a socialist by Joe Lhota seem like happy hour. There is no shortage of major problems on the horizon: a $2 billion city budget deficit, more than 100 municipal labor unions clamoring for raises, the need to maintain public safety while easing up on stop and frisk.”

Quartz: These 4 charts explain why Bill de Blasio won over New Yorkers — “While New York City rebounded from the recession faster and stronger than the rest of the state and country, a stubborn wealth gap persists. Granted, much of the city looks richer, cleaner, safer than 20 years ago before more moderate mayors took its helm. But there’s clear discontent over the concentration of that progress and those riches at the top of the income pyramid.”

New York Times: In New York City’s Sharp Left Turn, Questions of Just How Far — “[De Blasio] talked repeatedly of a gilded world capital rived by class divisions and inequality, where the children of the middle and working class struggle to find jobs and apartments. His vows to tax the rich in service of universal prekindergarten and to rein in police stop-and-frisk tactics that inflamed young black and Latino men became twin pillars of his campaign. Such talk worried some business leaders, who had grown accustomed to attentive treatment from Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. But in a post-Occupy Wall Street world, the mayor-elect’s message resonated with voters.”

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November 08 2013

15:00

Week In The News: Election 2013, Twitter IPO And Toronto’s Messy Mayor

Chris Christie and election night winners. Sebelius back in the hot seat. Twitter goes public. Toronto’s crack-smoking mayor. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

A crack smoking mayor across the border this week, and early signals in the US on 2016 politics ahead.  Chris Christie wins big as a fighting GOP moderate.  The tea party man loses in Virginia.  New York elects a mayor who’s vowed to take on inequality.  Stay tuned.  In Washington, the president says he’s sorry for Americans who are losing health policies.  They’ll have better policies says the White House.  The Senate votes gay rights in the workplace.  Twitter has a big-time IPO.  New jobs numbers and the GDP, up pretty strong.  Up next On Point:  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Alexander Burns, senior political reporter for Politico. (@ABurnsPolitico)

Kasie Hunt, reporter covering politics and Congress for NBC News. (@Kasie)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Politico: How Terry McAuliffe mapped his Virginia win — “Recognizing from the start that his path to victory was slim, McAuliffe’s campaign invested early and heavily in establishing powerful tactical advantages over Cuccinelli, including sophisticated modeling of the Virginia electorate, experimentally-vetted messaging and a vast turnout operation that sent more than 13,000 volunteers into the field in the last four days of the election.”

NBC News: Paul pledges ‘new approval process’ amid plagiarism charges — “Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul will create a ‘new approval process” for his speeches and written material after facing charges of plagiarism, a senior adviser said in a statement Tuesday. In a written statement, adviser Doug Stafford also suggested that some instances of possible plagiarism came from staffers, acknowledging that some information was not ‘clearly sourced or vetted properly.’”

New York Times: G.O.P. Weighs Limiting Clout of Right Wing — “While the discussion may appear arcane, it reflects a fierce struggle for power between the activist, often Tea Party-dominated wing of the Republican Party — whose members tend to be devoted to showing up and organizing at events like party conventions — and the more mainstream wing, which is frustrated by its inability to rein in the extremist elements and by the fact that its message is not resonating with more voters.”

November 06 2013

16:00

Mark Halperin And John Heilemann ‘Double Down’ On 2012 Elections

Swap Hillary for Biden? Mark Halperin and John Heilemann are back with “Double Down.” We’ll look at the 2012 campaign, 2013, 2016.

Election results 2013 are all over the headlines today.  Chris Christie, living large as a moderate Republican.  Democrat Terry McAuliffe slipping by Tea Partier Ken Cuccinelli in Virginia.  Tale of Two Cities Bill DeBlasio landsliding progressive in New York.  Political reporters Mark Halperin and John Heilemann are watching.  They know the big trends and the juicy stuff.  Wrote “Game Change” on the ’08 presidential campaign.  Now they’re out with “Double Down,” on Barack Obama, Mitt Romney and 2012.    Up next On Point:  all the juice on 2012, 2013, and the political road ahead.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Mark Halperin, editor-at-large and senior political analyst at TIME Magazine. Co-author of “Double Down: Game Change 2012.” Also co-author of “Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime.” (@MarkHalperin)

John Heilemann, national affairs editor for New York Magazine. Co-author of “Double Down: Game Change 2012.” Also co-author of “Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime.” (@JHeil)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Playing the Game Again, With an Insider’s Look at the Players — “The portraits of the players in campaign 2012 — from the candidates to their strategists to their big-money backers — are drawn in this volume with a light and snappy hand. The authors write that non-Mormon Romneyites found the feud between their man and the Republican hopeful Jon Huntsman Jr. ‘as impenetrable as a Tolkien subplot rendered in Elvish.’ They write that the Republican contender Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota had a reputation on the Hill for ‘churning through staffers as if they were disposable razors.’”

Politico: The Five Biggest Losers in “Double Down” — “Earlier in this presidency, Obama met with billionaire George Soros at the Waldorf as part of an unsuccessful bid to get him to open up his wallet for outside groups during the 2012 campaign, as he’d done in 2004. Soros talked Obama’s ear off for 45 minutes, giving the president unsolicited economic messaging advice. Obama was ‘annoyed and bored,’ according to the book. ‘If we don’t get anything out of him,’ Obama complained to aides afterward, ‘I’m never f-ing sitting with that guy again.’”

New York Mag: The Intervention — “The president’s advisers were barely more rattled. Yes, Denver had been atrocious. Yes, it had been unnerving. But Obama was still ahead of Romney, the sky hadn’t fallen, and they would fix what went wrong in time for the town-hall debate at Hofstra. Their message to the nervous Nellies in their party was: Keep calm and carry on.”

Read An Excerpt From “Double Down: Game Change 2012″ by Mark Malperin and John Heilemann

March 09 2012

21:55

Audio: The Russian Presidential Election | Center for Strategic and International Studies

January 28 2012

23:29

Taiwan's Presidential and Legislative Election:

FPRI Senior Fellows Shelley Rigger, Vincent Wang, Terry Cooke and Jacques deLisle assess the elections’ meaning and implications: Why did the winners win and the losers lose? What does the outcome portend for cross-Strait relations during the next four years? What is likely to be the impact on U.S. policy toward, and relations with, Taipei and Beijing? What are the implications for the future of Taiwan’s democracy and for the significant economic, social and foreign policy decisions Taiwan’s government faces in the near term? January 20, 2012 http://www.fpri.org/

January 17 2012

17:23

Dispatch from Port Said: An Observer’s Perspective on Egypt’s Pivotal Elections | Atlantic Council

June 11 2010

14:00

Week in the News

New sanctions for Iran. Women rule in Tuesday’s elections. And General McChrystal says not so fast in Afghanistan. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.
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