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February 21 2014

09:00

February 14 2014

08:11

Week In The News: Snowy South, Debt Ceiling, Michael Sam

Sochi medals. A debt-ceiling deal. Monsieur Hollande in Washington. Snowmageddon  in the South. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Cars are left abandoned along Franklin Street after a winter storm left poor conditions in Chapel Hill, N.C., Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning lasting into Thursday covering 95 of the state's 100 counties. (AP)

Cars are left abandoned along Franklin Street after a winter storm left poor conditions in Chapel Hill, N.C., Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning lasting into Thursday covering 95 of the state’s 100 counties. (AP)

Guests

Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent for CBS News. Correspondent-at-Large for National Journal. (@MajorCBS)

Laure Mandeville, U.S. bureau chief and chief White House correspondent for Le Figaro. (@lauremandeville)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: The Four Most Notable Nuggets From ‘The Hillary Papers’ – “Republicans are seizing Monday on a report published Sunday titled “The Hillary Papers.” The lengthy piece from the Washington Free Beacon, a conservative news Web site, details personal documents from one of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s closest friends, Diane Blair, a political science professor who died in 2000.”

CNN: The Southern snow was round one; here comes ice, the heavyweight –” The snow was here, two weeks ago. With just a smattering of white, it wreaked havoc on the South. But it may have been just an opening round. Now, an ice storm is hitting. And matched with snow, it’s the heavyweight of the two. Weather mavens expect up to an inch of ice will give broad swaths of the South a good shellacking. An inch doesn’t sound impressive? A foot of snow may look big and bad, but it’s a bunch of fluff compared to a solid inch of ice.”

Politico: Obamacare finally clears the tower – ”The new report is good enough that it might reset Washington’s expectations: maybe Obamacare isn’t going to be a train wreck after all. Maybe it’ll be more like one of those Metro trains that runs kind of slowly, and sometimes stops in the middle of the tracks for no apparent reason, but eventually gets you where you need to go.”

January 31 2014

08:41

Week In The News: Southern Freeze, State Of The Union, So Long Bernanke

A southern deep freeze. State of the Union. Bye, bye, Ben Bernanke. Our weekly news roundtable goes beyond the headlines.

In this aerial view looking at I-75 north at Mt. Paran Rd., abandoned cars are piled up on the median of the ice-covered interstate after a winter snow storm Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta's snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people. Georgia State Patrol troopers headed to schools where children were hunkered down early Wednesday after spending the night there, and transportation crews continued to treat roads and bring gas to motorists, Deal said. (AP)

In this aerial view looking at I-75 north at Mt. Paran Rd., abandoned cars are piled up on the median of the ice-covered interstate after a winter snow storm Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said early Wednesday that the National Guard was sending military Humvees onto Atlanta’s snarled freeway system in an attempt to move stranded school buses and get food and water to people.  (AP)

Guests

David Wessel, director, Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy at the Brookings Institution. Contributing correspondent for The Wall Street Journal.  (@davidmwessel)

Kelly O’Donnell, Congressional correspondent for NBC News. (@KellyO)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Interstate-clearing focus turns over 2,000 abandoned cars — “More than 2,000 cars still left abandoned on metro Atlanta interstates as of Wednesday evening, and with road conditions now passable city-wide, state officials were turning their focus Thursday to getting those cars safely off the roads.”

Reuters: Households, trade keep U.S. economy humming in fourth quarter – “Gross domestic product grew at a 3.2 percent annual rate in the final three months of last year, the Commerce Department said on Thursday, in line with economists’ expectations. While that was a slowdown from the third-quarter’s brisk 4.1 percent pace, it was a far stronger performance than had been anticipated earlier in the quarter and welcome news in light of some drag from October’s partial government shutdown.”

The Economist: Praying for peace — “Only  a few weeks ago the dismissal of the Ukrainian government by President Viktor Yanukovych and his offer to appoint an opposition leader as the country’s new prime minister would have had an electric effect. It would have been cheered by protesters on Kiev’s Independence Square (the Maidan) as an important victory. It might even have persuaded them to unblock the roads in the capital. Not any more. On January 28th Mr Yanukovych at last surrendered Nikolai Azarov, a long-serving but ineffectual prime minister. But that was met with a shrug of the shoulders by those manning the barricades in Kiev. “

January 24 2014

07:30

Week In The News: Syrian Peace Talks, Olympic Terror Threats, Obama On Pot

Syria peace talks. The President on pot. A hunt for black widows in Sochi. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Haitham al-Maleh, senior member of the Syrian National Coalition (SNC), Syria's main political opposition group, sits alone at the opposition table during the first day of the Syrian peace talks in Montreux, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. The Syrian peace talks begin with a bitter clash over President Bashar Assad's future. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Assad's decision to meet peaceful dissent with brutal force had robbed him of all legitimacy, while Assad's foreign minister declared that no one outside Syria had the right to remove the government. (AP)

Haitham al-Maleh, senior member of the Syrian National Coalition (SNC), Syria’s main political opposition group, sits alone at the opposition table during the first day of the Syrian peace talks in Montreux, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. The Syrian peace talks begin with a bitter clash over President Bashar Assad’s future. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Assad’s decision to meet peaceful dissent with brutal force had robbed him of all legitimacy, while Assad’s foreign minister declared that no one outside Syria had the right to remove the government. (AP)

Guests

Stephanie Grace, columnist for The Advocate in New Orleans. (@stephgracenola)

Michael Hirsh, chief correspondent for The National Journal. (@MichaelPHirsh)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

BBC News: Syria Geneva II: UN to hold talks with rival groups – “If all goes well, the hope seems to be that the big political questions which they cannot agree on will be sidestepped, our correspondent says. Instead concrete steps such as local truces and access for aid convoys in Syria will be discussed. But with the lack of trust on either side, even that may collapse into disagreements.”

The Guardian: Rouhani to take center stage at Davos economic forum — “Officials have played down the chances of a meeting between the pair but stranger things have happened in the cushy corridors of Davos, where world leaders mingle freely with celebrities, CEOs and ministers in a more relaxed atmosphere than usual summits. Rouhani announced on Twitter that he was to have bilateral meetings with officials from other countries.”

NBC News: Sochi Olympics terrorism threat: Two more ‘black widow’ suspects identified — “Russian security officials are hunting for two more young Muslim women — so-called “black widow” terror suspects — who they believe are planning to target the final stages of the Olympic torch relay with suicide bomb attacks. Wanted posters distributed by police say that the women have been dispatched by underground groups to attack between Tuesday and Thursday in Rostov-on-Don, where the torch is expected to arrive Wednesday on its way to the Olympic city of Sochi.”

January 17 2014

09:01

Week In The News: Bad Water, School Shooting, Net Neutrality

Poisoned water in West Virginia. Net neutrality takes a hit. Another school shooting – New Mexico. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Water buffaloes are made available to local residents in South Charleston, W.V. to fill coolers and other containers at the GeStamp Stamping Plant-South Charleston Sunday morning, Jan. 12, 2014. The ban on using water for drinking, washing and cleaning remains in effect following the chemical spill Thursday in the Elk River that has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties. (AP)

Water buffaloes are made available to local residents in South Charleston, W.V. to fill coolers and other containers at the GeStamp Stamping Plant-South Charleston Sunday morning, Jan. 12, 2014. The ban on using water for drinking, washing and cleaning remains in effect following the chemical spill Thursday in the Elk River that has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties. (AP)

Guests

John Heilemann, national affairs editor at New York Magazine and MSNBC political analyst. Co-author with Mark Halperin of “Double Down: Game Change 2012” and “Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin and the Race of a Lifetime.” (@jheil)

Nancy Cordes, Congressional correspondent for CBS News.  (@nancycordes)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN: ’Pay to play’ on the Web?: Net neutrality explained — “How would you like to have to pay a fee to be able to stream YouTube videos at full speed? What if you liked downloading music from, say, Last.fm or Soundcloud, but those sites suddenly became infinitely slower than bigger sites like Amazon or iTunes? Those are the kind of major changes to the Internet some folks are envisioning after a federal court ruling this week on what’s come to be called ‘net neutrality.’”

Politico: House approves bipartisan spending bill — “The House approved and sent to the Senate a landmark $1.1 trillion spending bill that fills in the blanks of December’s budget agreement and sets a new template for appropriations for the remainder of President Barack Obama’s second term. Adopted 359-67, the giant measure literally touches every corner of government. And more than any single document to date, it defines the new budget reality that faces the president and his activist agenda.”

Reuters: Pregnant women warned off West Virginia water in cleared areas — “One week after the spill into the Elk River prompted authorities to order some 300,000 people not to drink or wash with their tap water, officials have cleared more than 200,000 of them to start drinking the water again after tests showed levels below the 1 part per million level safety standard set by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But pregnant women should continue to steer clear of the water in an ‘abundance of caution’ until the chemical is completely undetectable, West Virginia American Water said.”

December 27 2013

09:01

Week In The News: 2013 In Review

Our weekly news roundtable –live and lively–in the studio looks back over a whole year, 2013.

Protesters hold posters of former National Security Agency member Edward Snowden in front of the German parliament building, the Reichstag, prior to a special meeting of the parliament on US-German relationships, in Berlin, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013.  (AP)

Protesters hold posters of former National Security Agency member Edward Snowden in front of the German parliament building, the Reichstag, prior to a special meeting of the parliament on US-German relationships, in Berlin, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. (AP)

Guests

Karen Tumulty, national political correspondent for The Washington Post. (@ktumulty)

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times. (@SangerNYT)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: White House Tries to Prevent Judge From Ruling on Surveillance Efforts –”The government said that despite recent leaks by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor, that made public a fuller scope of the surveillance and data collection programs put in place after the Sept. 11 attacks, sensitive secrets remained at risk in any courtroom discussion of their details — like whether the plaintiffs were targets of intelligence collection or whether particular telecommunications providers like AT&T and Verizon had helped the agency.”

Washington Post: Republicans reassess after shutdown debacle — “The GOP establishment has embarked, once again, on a round of soul-searching. But this time, the question is: What will it take to save the Republicans from the self-destructive impulses of the tea party movement? That the government shutdown was a political disaster for the party that engineered it is widely acknowledged, except by the most ardent tea partners. And that near-unanimity presents an opportunity for the establishment to strike back — and maybe regain some control from the insurgent wing.”

Boston Globe: The Fall of the House of Tsarnaev — “Federal investigators have suspected that Tamerlan, the 26-year-old boxer from southern Russia who is believed, along with his brother, to have set off the deadly Boston Marathon bombs in April, was motivated, if not deliberately directed, by real life jihadist revolutionaries on the other side of the globe. But an investigation by the Boston Globe suggests that Tamerlan was in the perilous grip of someone far more menacing: himself.”

December 13 2013

08:32

Week In The News: Budget Deal, Mourning Mandela And The Struggle In Ukraine

A budget deal, a handshake, a struggle in Ukraine and the world mourns Mandela. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Nancy Cordes, Congressional correspondent for CBS News. (@nancycordes)

Michael Hirsh, chief correspondent for the National Journal. (@michaelphirsh)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

National Journal: Behind the ‘Volcker Rule’: The Mutt-and-Jeff Team That Tackled Wall Street – “The Volcker Rule was, in fact, in grave danger of being loopholed to death right up until its adoption this week. And in the end it was largely one regulator, more than any other, stood firm against those efforts and managed to avert the worst of the watering down: Gary Gensler, the outgoing chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. As diminutive in stature as Volcker is towering, Gensler was the Jeff to Volcker’s Mutt, an essential part of a de facto team.”

Washington Post: Sebelius: Enrollment up with improving HealthCare.gov; review of problems launched — “The administration announced Wednesday that about 365,000 Americans chose health plans during the first two months of the federal and state insurance marketplaces, bringing the total to more than triple the meager enrollment from October. A report accompanying the announcement showed that the number of people who collectively signed up for coverage in the 14 states running their own insurance exchanges continued to outpace the total enrollment from the three dozen states relying on the federal marketplace.”

Reuters: U.S. schools look to guards, technology a year after Sandy Hook — “Schools are aiming to stop gun scares and killings, such as the shooting deaths of three students at an Ohio high school in February 2012, the wounding of two students at a California high school in January 2013 and a potential mass shooting at a Georgia elementary school in August that was averted when a school bookkeeper talked the gunman into laying down his AK-47 assault rifle. The number of school resource officers or law enforcement officers assigned to schools has risen to levels not seen since the aftermath of the 1999 Columbine High School ‘massacre’ in Colorado, in which 13 people were shot to death, said Maurice Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers.”

December 06 2013

11:12

Week In The News: Biden In Beijing, Pension Reforms And Nelson Mandela

Biden in Beijing. Public pensions under the gun. Remembering Nelson Mandela – our Weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Gideon Roseeditor of Foreign Affairs.

David Shepardson, Washington, D.C. bureau chief for The Detroit News. (@davidshepardson)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Detroit News: Detroit pension funds seek direct appeal of bankruptcy ruling — “The city’s pension funds and its largest union asked for permission Wednesday to appeal the city’s bankruptcy eligibility to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing the historic case needs to be heard by a higher court before retiree pensions are cut. The pension funds and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees are trying to protect retiree pensions from cuts in a fight that could lead to the U.S. Supreme Court and avoid a ruling that could impact pensions in struggling cities nationwide.”

BBC News: US and China in ‘very direct’ air zone talks — “Talks in Mr Biden’s Asia trip have been dominated by a new air zone declared by China, which covers islands controlled by Japan in the East China Sea. China says its move is consistent with ‘international law and practice.’ China announced a new Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) last month, and said aircraft flying through the zone must follow its rules, including filing flight plans. The ADIZ covers islands claimed and controlled by Japan, and a submerged rock claimed by South Korea.”

New York Daily News: MTA: Alert system for engineer was on wrong end of derailed Metro-North train — “The ‘alerter’ system sounds a warning after 25 seconds of inactivity from the engineer. It can activate the brakes automatically if the engineer doesn’t respond to the prompt in 15 seconds. That may have prevented disaster when engineer William Rockefeller apparently nodded off before the train approached a sharp curve near the Spuyten Duyvil station in the Bronx on Sunday morning — a bend that requires trains to slow down from a 70 mph limit to just 30 mph.”

October 18 2013

04:31

Week In The News: Shutdown, Senate Deal And ACA Struggles

Shutdown ends. Iran nuke talks.  Dry ice bombs at LAX.  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Kristen Welker, White House Correspondent for NBC News. (@KWelkerNBC)

Bob Cusack, managing editor of The Hill. (@BobCusack)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

National Review: McConnell’s Exit Interview — “This thing that passed the Senate, which, honestly, only maintained the status quo for a few more months, was better than what the House tried to pass and couldn’t pass, because it has a longer CR, which is what we wanted. That’s how challenging it is when you can’t get something more in line with what you’d like to achieve over here. So, my job is to acquaint our members, the best I can, with the reality of our situation, and try to get them to enable me to get us all out of the ditch—and my members weren’t happy being in a 16-day government shutdown and being a day away from rattling the markets by getting close to default.”

Washington Post: Government reopens after shutdown; Obama urges Congress to resist ‘extremes’ — “Obama called on Congress to resist ‘pressure from the extremes’ and ‘understand that how business is done in this town has to change.’ He urged lawmakers to pursue a ‘balanced’ long-term budget and pass comprehensive immigration reform and a new farm bill. And he delivered a heartfelt ‘thank you’ to federal workers as they return to their jobs. ‘What you do is important, and don’t let anybody else tell you different,’ he said.”

Christian Science Monitor: Why a little-noticed chat between the US and Iran is a big deal – “Rarely has there been a greater study in contrasts in Iran than now, as outbursts of familiar, fierce anti-American rhetoric – a staple since Iran’s 1979 Islamic revolution – are joined by the taboo-breaking surge of high-level US-Iran contact. But Iran experts note that Tehran’s new diplomatic push to resolve the nuclear issue should not be conflated with overcoming the far more challenging historical and ideological differences that have kept the US and Iran arch enemies for a generation.”

September 27 2013

08:37

Week In The News: Shutdown Threat, Kenya Terror, Iran

Shutdown mania.  Nairobi’s mall of terror.  The olive branch from Iran.  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Nancy Cordes, congressional correspondent for CBS News. (@nancycordes)

David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times. (@sangernyt)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

The New York Times: Obama, an Evolving Doctrine on Foreign Policy – ”For five years, President Obama has publicly struggled with the question of when America is willing to act as the world’s policeman, and when he will insist that others take the lead, or at least share the risks, costs and resentments it engenders.”

BBC: Kenya siege: Nairobi shopping mall searched for bodies – ”Kenyan and foreign forensics teams are searching the Westgate shopping complex in Nairobi amid uncertainty over how many bodies they may find following the four-day siege by Islamist militants. Sixty-seven people are so far known to have died.”

The Washington Post: House Republicans explore strategy to avoid federal government shutdown –”With federal agencies set to close their doors in five days, House Republicans began exploring a potential detour on the path to a shutdown: shifting the fight over President Obama’s health-care law to a separate bill that would raise the nation’s debt limit. If it works, the strategy could clear the way for the House to approve a simple measure to keep the government open into the new fiscal year, which will begin Tuesday, without hotly contested provisions to defund the Affordable Care Act.”

September 20 2013

07:37

Week in the News: Navy Yard Shooting, Congressional Infighting, Syria

The Navy Yard massacre.  Brazil and NSA spying. Chemical weapons negotiation and Syria. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Rich Lowry, editor of The National Review, author of “Lincoln Unbound: How An Ambitious Young Railsplitter Saved the American Dream — And How We Can Do It Again.” (@RichLowry)

Katrina vanden Heuvel, editor and publisher of the Nation Magazine, author of “The Change I Believe In: Fighting for Progress in the Age of Obama.” (@KatrinaNation)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

USA Today: Obama Reportedly To Meet Abbas Next Week — “In addition to chemical weapons in Syria, a military takeover in Egypt, and the nuclear challenge in Iran, President Obama is also dealing this month with the long-standing Middle East dispute between the Israelis and Palestinians.”

National Journal: A September to Surrender: Syria and Summers Spell Second-Term Slump — “There are no ‘obstructionist’ Republican fingerprints on the conspicuous and power-depleting defeats for Obama. He never sought a vote on Syria and therefore was not humiliated. The same is true for Summers. But Obama lost ground on both fronts and ultimately surrendered to political realities that, for the first time in his presidency, were determined by his own obdurate party.”

Washington Post: NSA Spying Spoils Dinner at the White House for Brazil’s President – “Rousseff, who had a 36 percent approval rating last month in the wake of nationwide protests against substandard public services, has been under pressure from leftists in her Workers’ Party movement to stay home. Canceling the trip is seen as politically expedient here, partly because she faces a tough reelection campaign next year. But Brazil’s decision will in the short term be damaging for the country, which has a struggling economy that is seeking American investment and a greater opening to Brazilian products.”

September 06 2013

10:22

Week In The News: Syria And Congress, G20, Fukushima

An attack on Syria goes before Congress. Obama in Russia. Diana Nyad’s epic swim. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Indira Lakshmanan, senior correspondent for Bloomberg News covering foreign policy. (@indira_l)

Susan Davis, chief congressional reporter for USA Today. (@davisusan)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

USA Today: House panel debate shows divide over Syria resolution – “The Obama administration’s push for congressional approval of military strikes on Syria continued Wednesday in the GOP-led U.S. House, where Secretary of State John Kerry compared inaction against Syria to early efforts to appease Nazi Germany.”

Bloomberg News: Kerry Turns From Anti-War Protester to Syria Salesman – “Kerry, who spent hours testifying on Capitol Hill the past two days to persuade reluctant lawmakers to approve a strike to punish the Syrian regime for what the U.S. says was the gassing of 1,400 people, has emerged as the Obama administration’s most passionate advocate of a military response to an atrocity.”

Reuters: Pressure grows on Obama over Syria at G20 summit – “U.S. President Barack Obama faced growing pressure from world leaders on Thursday not to launch military strikes in Syria at a summit on the global economy that was hijacked by the conflict.”

August 30 2013

14:00

Week In The News: Syria, March Anniversary, Fort Hood Sentence

All eyes on Syria. Remembering the March on Washington. The Fort Hood shooter sentenced to death. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

The Syrian government charged with using chemical weapons, killing more than a thousand.  President Obama moves towards strikes. UN chemical weapons inspectors are on the ground. Russia and Iran say back off. Great Britain waivers. Around the world, the stakes are raised.

And at home, the U.S. remembers the March on Washington and MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The Fort Hood shooter is sentenced to death. Massive wildfires in Yosemite. The NFL settles their big concussion suit, but doesn’t admit fault.

This hour, On Point:  our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Mark Mazzetti, national security correspondent for the New York Times. (@markmazzettinyt)

Margaret Talev, White House correspondent for Bloomberg News. (@margarettalev)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: U.S. Facing Test on Data to Back Action on Syria – “With the botched intelligence about Iraq still casting a long shadow over decisions about waging war in the Middle East, the White House faces an American public deeply skeptical about being drawn into the Syrian conflict and a growing chorus of lawmakers from both parties angry about the prospect of an American president once again going to war without Congressional consultation or approval.”

Bloomberg News: King Speech 50 Years on Shows Black Distress Endures – “The U.S. has a black president, millions of African-Americans have earned advanced degrees, and growing numbers hold professional and management jobs that were out of reach in 1963. Yet by almost every measure — income, economic mobility, housing, education, employment, standing in the criminal justice system and life expectancy — they’re lagging behind whites, according to census and other data compiled by Bloomberg.”

The Washington Post: Nidal Hasan sentenced to death for Fort Hood shooting rampage – “Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan was sentenced to death Wednesday for killing 13 people and wounding 32 others in a 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Tex., the worst mass murder at a military installation in U.S. history. Dressed in Army fatigues, Hasan, who turns 43 next month, listened impassively as the death sentence was handed down by a panel of 13 senior military officers in a unanimous decision after less than two hours of deliberations.”

 

August 23 2013

12:46

Week In The News: Syria Horror, Manning Sentence, NSA

Nerve gas charges and scenes of horror in Syria.  Bradley Manning gets 35 years.  More trouble for the NSA.  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Romesh Ratnesar, international editor and deputy editor for Bloomberg Businessweek. (@romeshratnesar)

Rana Foroohar, assistant managing editor for Time magazine, in charge of economics and business. (@ranaforoohar)

From Tom’s Reading List

NBC News: UN has ‘strong concern’ over reports of hundreds killed in Syria chemicals weapons attacks – “The U.N. Security Council said Wednesday it was necessary to clarify reports from Syria’s opposition that hundreds of civilians – including many women and children – have been killed in chemical weapons attacks. The council, however, stopped short of demanding a probe by U.N. investigators in Syria — although said it welcomed U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon’s calls for one.”

Politico: Bradley Manning plans to ask for White House pardon – “Bradley Manning’s defense team plans to ask President Barack Obama to pardon the soldier, who was sentenced to 35 years in prison for giving thousands of secret government documents to WikiLeaks. Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, said Wednesday he would file a request early next week with the Department of the Army with the hope of making its way to the president, asking him either to pardon Manning or commute his sentence to time served.”

The Wall Street Journal: New Details Show Broader NSA Surveillance Reach – “The National Security Agency—which possesses only limited legal authority to spy on U.S. citizens—has built a surveillance network that covers more Americans’ Internet communications than officials have publicly disclosed, current and former officials say. The system has the capacity to reach roughly 75% of all U.S. Internet traffic in the hunt for foreign intelligence, including a wide array of communications by foreigners and Americans. In some cases, it retains the written content of emails sent between citizens within the U.S. and also filters domestic phone calls made with Internet technology, these people say.”

 

August 16 2013

06:29

Week In The News: Bloody Cairo, Stop And Frisk, Airline Merger Grounded

“Stop and frisk” ruled unconstitutional.  Big airline merger grounded.  Deadly clashes in Cairo.  Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Devlin Barrett, justice department reporter at the Wall Street Journal. (@devlinbarrett)

Anne Gearan, diplomatic correspondent at the Washington Post. (@agearan)

From Tom’s Reading List

Reuters: Protesters storm Cairo building after bloodbath; Obama cancels war games – “Supporters of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood stormed and torched a government building in Cairo on Thursday, while families tried to identify hundreds of mutilated bodies piled in a Cairo mosque a day after they were shot dead by the security forces.”

New York Times: Judge Rejects New York’s Stop-and-Frisk Policy – “A federal judge ruled on Monday that the stop-and-frisk tactics of the New York Police Department violated the constitutional rights of minorities in the city, repudiating a major element in the Bloomberg administration’s crime-fighting legacy.”

CNN: US government seeks to block American-US Airways merger – “The Justice Department and attorneys general from six states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging the $11 billion merger of American Airlines and US Airways, saying the combination would lead to higher prices and less service for consumers.”

August 09 2013

04:20

Week In The News: Terror Threat, Summit Canceled, A-Rod’s Punishment

With John Harwood in for Tom Ashbrook.

Obama cancels on Russia. New terror threats. A-Rod’s punishment. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Martha Raddatz, chief global affairs correspondent for ABC News. (@martharaddatz)

Byron York, chief political correspondent for the Washington Examiner. (@byronyork)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From The Reading List

The Washington Post: Obama cancels summit meeting with Putin over Snowden case – “President Obama canceled an upcoming summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday, a rare, deliberate snub that reflects the fresh damage done by the Edward Snowden case to an important relationship already in decline.”

CNN: More suspected al Qaeda militants killed as drone strikes intensify in Yemen – “Drone strikes against militants in Yemen are intensifying as the U.S. Embassy there and in other Middle Eastern and African countries remain closed amid terrorism fears. Seven suspected U.S. drone strikes have been reported in the past two weeks alone. They have killed at least 31 people, according to a tally by Yemeni officials.”

ESPN: A-Rod formally appeals suspension – “The Major League Baseball Players Association formally appealed Alex Rodriguez’s 211-game suspension Wednesday, sending the case to an independent arbitrator. Union spokesman Greg Bouris confirmed the appeal and said the players’ association had no further comment.”

August 02 2013

14:00

Week In The News: Job Numbers, Snowden And NSA, Mideast Peace Talks

A Bradley Manning verdict. Pope Francis on gays. New Middle East peace talks. Our weekly news round table goes behind the headlines.

Edward Snowden is out of the airport in Moscow, and the U.S. is in a major snit with Russia this week, as the amazing reverberations of one high school dropout with NSA clearance roll on.

Lots of economic numbers out — on jobs, housing, GDP. Not bad, but far from great.

On Wall Street, a jury goes against Fabulous Fab of Goldman Sachs, but the big fish still swim free.

On a plane home from Brazil, the pope says “Who am I to judge?” on gays.

We’ve got a Bradley Manning verdict, A-Rod in trouble, Mideast peace talks.

This hour, On Point: Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Diane Brady, editor and content chief for Bloomberg Businessweek. (@dianebrady)

Michael Hirsh, chief correspondent for National Journal. (@michaelphirsh)

Jack BeattyOn Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

NPR: U.S. Unemployment Sinks To 7.4 Percent In July Jobs Report: “But employers added 162,000 jobs in the month, coming in under economists’ expectations.”

National Journal: How America’s Top Tech Companies Created The Surveillance State: “These moral issues—the balance that the intel community has tried to strike between surveillance needs and privacy concerns—have never been resolved, as illustrated by the intense public debate over whether Snowden is a whistle-blower or a traitor.”

Bloomberg: S&P 500 Climbs Above 1,700 On Stimulus Bets, Economy: “Three rounds of bond purchases by the Fed, coupled with improving earnings and economic growth, has helped propel the S&P 500 up more than 150 percent from its bear-market low in 2009.”

The Washington Post: Israelis, Palestinians To Launch Talks Aimed At Peace Deal, Independent Palestinian State: “Israeli and Palestinian negotiators shook hands Tuesday to resume long-stalled direct peace talks that Secretary of State John F. Kerry said will seek to give birth to an independent Palestinian state nine months from now.”

Video

On Tuesday, July 30, President Obama spoke about job growth and the corporate tax code:

July 19 2013

05:14

Week In The News: Zimmerman Verdict, Abortion Bill, Filibuster Deal

Zimmerman, acquitted. Texas goes tough on abortion. Boston bombing suspect on the cover of Rolling Stone. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Pierre Thomas, senior justice correspondent for ABC News. (@pierretabc)

Susan Davis, chief congressional correspondent at USA Today. (@davisusan)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Los Angeles Times: Zimmerman verdict continues to stoke outrage – “The six-woman jury that acquitted George Zimmerman in the fatal shooting ofTrayvon Martin was initially split down the middle, with half voting to acquit, two for manslaughter and one for second-degree murder, according to the first juror to speak publicly. She was among those favoring acquittal, the juror told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Monday night.”

Reuters: Texas governor signs strict abortion law that sparked protests – “Texas Governor Rick Perry on Thursday signed into law tough new restrictions on abortion, including a ban after 20 weeks of pregnancy, marking one of the biggest victories in a decade for opponents of the procedure in the United States.”

The Boston Globe: Disgust, outrage greet news of Tsarnaev cover in Boston – “A flattering picture of a shaggy Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover of the latest issue of Rolling Stone, which some have compared to portraits of Bob Dylan and Jim Morrison, has sparked a raft of criticism throughout the region, from local officials who called the cover tasteless to merchants vowing to keep the issue off their shelves.”

June 28 2013

09:55

Week In The News: Supreme Court, Obama On Climate, Snowden

With Anthony Brooks in for Tom Asbhrook

Gay marriage and more at the High Court. President Obama to Africa. A Cold War over Edward Snowden. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Gerald Seib, Washington bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal, where he writes their Capital Journal column. (@GeraldFSeib)

William McKenzie, editorial columnist for The Dallas Morning News. (@Bill_McKenzie)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From The Reading List

SCOTUS Blog

Slate: Supreme Court 2013: The Year In Review

The Associated Press: Obama: No Wheeling Or Dealing To Extradite Snowden – “Obama said the damage to U.S. national security has already been done and his top focus now is making sure it can’t happen again.”

NPR: Obama’s Climate Strategy Doesn’t Require Congressional Approval – “President Obama unveiled a sweeping plan Tuesday designed to deal with climate change. For the first time, carbon emissions from power plants would be regulated. The policy, which can be implemented by the administration without congressional approval, calls for a broad range of actions, including steps to deal with extreme weather events that are already occurring.”

The New York Times: Mandela’s Illness Weighs On Obama’s Africa Trip – “Mr. Mandela has long been a beacon for Mr. Obama, who recounted again on Thursday how the revolution unleashed by Mr. Mandela a world away had inspired his own activisim. Friends of Mr. Obama say that for him and many of his contemporaries, the fight against apartheid was the equivalent of the civil rights movement of an earlier generation.”

WBUR: Federal Grand Jury Indicts Marathon Bombing Suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev – “The indictment charges the 19-year-old with using a weapon of mass destruction and bombing a place of public use, resulting in death, among other charges.”

 

June 21 2013

06:08

Week In The News: Taliban, NSA, Immigration

Obama and Putin’s chilly meeting. The Supreme Court says no to Arizona’s voter ID law. Protests rock Brazil. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Bryan Monroe, editor of CNN Politics. (@BryanMonroeCNN)

Trudy Rubin, foreign affairs columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer. (@trudyrubin)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Al Jazeera: Karzai ‘Willing To Join’ Taliban Peace Talks — “The talks were thrown into disarray when Karzai cancelled a planned delegation to the newly opened Taliban office in Doha because he said the US broke commitments that the office would not be seen as an embassy or government-in-exile.”

The New York Times: Web’s Reach Binds N.S.A. And Silicon Valley Leaders – “Silicon Valley has what the spy agency wants: vast amounts of private data and the most sophisticated software available to analyze it. The agency in turn is one of Silicon Valley’s largest customers for what is known as data analytics, one of the valley’s fastest-growing markets. To get their hands on the latest software technology to manipulate and take advantage of large volumes of data, United States intelligence agencies invest in Silicon Valley start-ups, award classified contracts and recruit technology experts.”

CNN: Senate Immigration Deal Includes Tougher Border Security – “A bipartisan amendment intended to increase Republican support for a Senate immigration bill would require 20,000 more border agents, completing a 700-mile fence on the frontier with Mexico and taking other steps before undocumented immigrants can get green cards, GOP sponsors of the compromise said Thursday.”

NPR: Supreme Court Strikes Down Arizona Voting Law – “The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a state-mandated requirement that prospective voters in Arizona provide proof of citizenship to be able to register to vote in national elections. But some experts are concerned that the court may have inserted a few ‘poison pills’ in its opinion that would damage voting-rights protections someday down the road.”

The Economist: T time: The G8 Pledges To Tackle The ‘Three Ts’ — “A new seven-point strategy to end the bloodshed in Syria was the headline-grabber from the G8 summit in Northern Ireland on June 17th-18th. But the leaders of some of the world’s richest economies also made progress on the ‘three Ts’: trade, transparency and tax.”

 

 

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