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February 20 2014

17:09

February 05 2014

14:18

God and Sex

Speaker: Matt Chandler

January 16 2014

02:57

The Biggest Areas of Focus In Your Life

In this episode, Adam discusses the importance of your top four priorities: Faith, Relationships, Career and Goals.

December 28 2013

15:59

Prekariatet - en ny global underklass? - Filosofiska rummet | Sveriges Radio

Bo Isenberg, Jeanette Emt och Tapio Salonen diskuterar vad som knnetecknar det som den brittiske ekonomen Guy Standing kallar fr prekariatet - den n... http://sverigesradio.se/sida/avsnitt/299297?programid=793

December 17 2013

07:22

A Humanist Take On Jesus’ Life And Meaning

Novelist and biographer Jay Parini takes on the still-unfolding story of Jesus.

An image of a young Jesus in the workshop of St. Joseph in a 1640s painting by Georges de La Tour. (Creative Commons)

An image of a young Jesus in the workshop of St. Joseph, from a 1640s-era painting by Georges de La Tour. (Creative Commons)

Guest

Jay Parini, professor of English and Creative Writing at Middlebury College in Vermont. Author of “Jesus: The Human Face Of God.” Also author of “The Passages of Herman Melville,” “The Apprentice Lover” and ‘The Last Station: A Novel Of Tolstoy’s Final Year.”

From Tom’s Reading List

The Daily Beast: Who Was Jesus, Anyway? – “Who was Jesus anyway? After twenty centuries, there is not much anyone can agree on. The four canonical gospels don’t measure up to modern standards of biographical writing, and—outside of this material—there is precious little contemporary evidence, apart from a few glancing mentions of Jesus or the movement centered on him. In truth, Jesus did not, in his own time, attract much notice.”

The New Yorker: Who Am I To Judge? – “‘Who am I to judge?’ With those five words, spoken in late July in reply to a reporter’s question about the status of gay priests in the Church, Pope Francis stepped away from the disapproving tone, the explicit moralizing typical of Popes and bishops. This gesture of openness, which startled the Catholic world, would prove not to be an isolated event. In a series of interviews and speeches in the first few months after his election, in March, the Pope unilaterally declared a kind of truce in the culture wars that have divided the Vatican and much of the world. Repeatedly, he argued that the Church’s purpose was more to proclaim God’s merciful love for all people than to condemn sinners for having fallen short of strictures, especially those having to do with gender and sexual orientation.”

CNN: Seeking The Truth About Jesus — “There are probably as many visions of Jesus, and versions, as there are Christians. Many regard him as their savior, the Son of God sent to Earth to save human beings from themselves. Others see him as a great teacher, a healer or rabbi of extraordinary power, a holy man or prophet who proposed a new covenant between heaven and earth. To some, he represents a new world order, an egalitarian society, a preacher of nonviolence who asked us to turn the other cheek.”

Read An Excerpt From “Jesus: The Human Face Of God” By Jay Parini

December 09 2013

15:52

‘Jefferson’s Qu’ran’ And Islam In America

How a founding father, Thomas Jefferson, came to understand Islam.

Back in the founding days of this nation, ideas were big.  The rights of Man.  Democracy, and citizenship.  And of course, freedom of religion.  But the religious debates were mostly among Protestants.  Catholics and Jews were the outliers.  Muslims?  Well they were beyond the pale.  The Ottoman, the Barbary pirate.  And, lest we forget, the American slave.  But a new book says Thomas Jefferson thought about Islam and could see a day when Muslims would be a part of the fabric of American democracy.  This hour On Point:  Thomas Jefferson, his Koran and Islam in American history.

Guests

Denise Spellberg, professor of history and Middle Eastern studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Author of “Jefferson’s Qur’an: Islam And The Founders.”

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN), member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Minnesota’s Fifth District. First Muslim to be elected to the U.S. Congress. (@KeithEllison)

From The Reading List

San Francisco Chronicle: ’Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an,’ by Denise Spellberg — “One of the strangest symptoms of our diseased political culture is the stubborn belief of some, despite all the contrary evidence, that President Obama is a Muslim. Slander and calumny are hardly new features of American politics. Usually it takes the form of an accusation that so-and-so is a socialist, or even a ‘commie’ – another fervid charge frequently leveled at our current president. But as it turns out, the accusation that he is a Muslim is a quality that Obama shares with one of his most illustrious predecessors, Thomas Jefferson.”

The Daily Beast: How Islam Shaped the Founders — “Thomas Jefferson, a central figure in Spellberg’s book, had a strong, lifelong commitment to religious liberty. Jefferson rejected toleration, the alternative perspective and one embraced by John Locke and John Adams, as grounded on the idea that a religious majority has a right to impose its will on a religious minority, but chooses to be tolerant for reasons of benevolence. Religious liberty, Jefferson argued, denies the majority any right to coerce a dissenting minority, even one hostile to religion. Jefferson rejected using government power to coerce religious belief and practice because it would create a nation of tyrants and hypocrites, as it is impossible to force someone to believe against the promptings of his conscience.”

New York Times: People Of the Book – “Jefferson, studying law at the College of William and Mary, acquired an English translation of Islam’s sacred text. He never claimed that the Quran shaped his political orientation. Yet Spellberg, an associate professor of Middle Eastern studies at the University of Texas at Austin, makes a persuasive case for its centrality. To oversimplify: What began as an academic interest in Islamic law and religion yielded a fascination with Islamic culture, which disposed him to include Muslims in his expansive vision of American citizenship.”

Read An Excerpt Of “Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an: Islam And The Founders” by Denise Spellberg

December 08 2013

09:22

HTML-Mails gehen gar nicht

Beim ersten NachGespräch war Manuel Grabowski zu Gast. Fast 1,5h haben wir uns über viele Themenbereiche unterhalten. Um es dir beim Hören zu erleichtern, ist der gesamte Podcast in Einzelkapitel aufgeteilt - um alle Kapitel samt Player zu sehen, wäre Flash allerdings nötig. In einer Woche findet dann das erste NachGespräch zu diesem Gespräch statt. Jetzt seid ihr gefragt: Gebt Feedback zum Gespräch, stellt weitere Fragen etc.

December 05 2013

07:12

Richard Rodriguez On Modern Spiritual Identity

Mexican-American essayist and big thinker Richard Rodriguez joins us on identity, immigration and the human spirit.

Guest

Richard Rodriguez, essayist, journalist and author of “Darling: A Spiritual Autobiography.” Also author of “Brown: The Last Discovery of America,” “Days of Obligation: An Argument With My Mexican Father” and “Hunger Of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez.”

Rudy Lopez, community activist and senior organizer with F.I.R.M., the Fair Immigration Reform Movement.

From Tom’s Reading List

PBS: Writer Richard Rodriguez introduces readers to ‘seasons of belief and doubt’ — “My religious tradition has always accepted doubt as part of the procedure of believing in God. And I think that becomes a kind of a protection against extremism. But religion is under assault right now from various places. There’s something called a new atheism in the air that is coming into the country. And it has a dogmatism to it that doesn’t quite understand that religion itself has within it disbelief, that there isn’t a religious life of, what shall I say, seasons of belief and doubt.”

New America Media: When Love Prevails – Latino Families at the Center of Immigrant and LGBT Rights — “The political act of coming out has also propelled support for comprehensive immigration reform. Dreamers and other immigrants have inspired a movement by coming out as undocumented. Their courage has inspired others to fight deportations of family, friends, and entire communities.”

Boston Globe: ‘Darling’ by Richard Rodriguez – “Despite its opening epiphany, this is not a political work — Rodriguez proposes no solutions (though he takes stern swipes at atheism, including that of fellow public intellectuals like the late Christopher Hitchens). Rather, he offers an efflorescence of subtle questions that may be more useful than the blunt ones that dominate today’s media and public conversation.”

Read An Excerpt From “Darling” By Richard Rodriguez

December 03 2013

22:25

Eric Lyman: ‘I Don't Think There's Anything Boilerplate About Pope Francis’

At the end of our Dec. 3 hour on poverty wages in America, we turned to Rome for a quick check-in on Pope Francisradical new apostolic exhortation that criticized the capitalist system, among other things. Freelance reporter Eric Lyman let us know that this statement is drawing attention from many quarters of the international media — ourselves included — for its unique take on economic issues.

“It’s the kind of document that most of the time doesn’t get a lot of attention because it deals with fairly esoteric or canonical or spiritual issues and in the mainstream press most folks don’t talk about it. But because there was this aspect, this sort of biting critique of capitalism, this one sure turned a lot of heads.”

The apostolic exhortation was long — more than 84 pages — and is almost a road map for the next steps of Pope Francis’ young papacy. But it wasn’t necessarily meant to change the global economic system, Lyman cautions.

“I don’t think that it was meant to be a kind of an economic treatise. A lot of the criticism of the Pope’s point of view in the European press has been to make an equivalence between him and Karl Marx, and I don’t think it was sort of meant to be a sort policy initiative that a minister of finance or central bank governor would adopt but I think he did want to cast some light on the growing disparity between the rich and poor, and point out some of the hypocrisy that’s involved in some religious institutions and people who claim to be religious, fostering this widening gap.”

Still, the Pope has made a lot of headline-generating moves in his eight-month tenure. It’s all part of the pope’s larger view on his role in the world, Lyman says.

“Well this pope — it’s a short papacy so far, only eight and a half months — but he hasn’t shied away from stating his point of view on a wide variety of issues, and certainly not just on economics, but on homosexuality within in the church, on women’s rights, on social justice,  on politics, on inter-religious dialogue with other faiths, and so on. I think that that this statement that he’s made here is attracting attention from a new corner, bit this fits into a wider point of view that the pope has, which is that he needs to be a kind of moral guidance for the world and for Christians and that touches on a lot of areas, including on economics.”

Pope Francis’ way of going about things makes him unique, however, Lyman says. His almost populist resonance echoes some pope’s from earlier in the 20th Century.

I don’t think there’s anything boilerplate about Pope Francis. I think he’s very original in the way he’s doing things. I don’t think he’s  doing anything for effect. I think he’s stating the things he believes. It’s true that in the recent past we haven’t thing anything like this before. Pope Benedict XVI, who was pope from 2005 to 2008, said nothing like this and it would have been as hypocritical if he had, because he was seen as very much in the old mold of the papacy, with a lot of opulence and so on. And John Paul in his waning years also was  unlikely to delve into such an area. But I think for a lot of people he recalls the early years of John Paul II’s papacy and even more so the very brief 33 day papacy of John Paul I in 1978. These were both natural populists as well as John XXIII in the 1960s, and this kind of resonance that those men had, and speaking of John Paul II, only in the early years of his papacy when he was much healthier.  I think Francis is tapping into some of that. But of course with a Latin American accent and his own personality stamp on it as well.”

Some European newspapers have taken offense at the Pope’s message, Lyman says (some American news-makers, too, it would seem).

“There was a serious piece that came in one of the Italian newspapers, Il Sole 24 Ore, the Italian equivalent of The Wall Street Journal, that criticized him for weighing in on things he didn’t understand and drawing parallels to Marxism.”

And there’s been debate over the place of more conservative Catholics in the changing church. Where could they fit in Pope Francis’ new way? Lyman says those Catholics still can see their views represented.

“I don’t know exactly what’s gonna happen because in many ways Pope Francis is still a conservative Catholic. He’s a Jesuit, he’s not any kind of a theological liberal on issues related to the church, such as the role of women. He’s not budged an inch on whether women would ever be ordained. You know he did famously say about gay Christians, ‘Who am I to judge?’ But he gave no indication that the church was gonna change its rules on that kind of thing. So I think that they have something to hold on to.”

What do you make of Pope Francis’ latest statement, and the future fo the Catholic Church? Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

November 18 2013

22:03

David Marr on The Prince: Faith, Abuse and George Pell - Religion - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

November 13 2013

07:54

William Irwin Thompson, (Planetary Culture and New Image of Humanity, Summer Conference 1974)

The founder of Lindisfarne gives the introductory talk on the re-visioning of art, science, and religion for a new planetary culture and a new image of humanity.

November 12 2013

05:56

Flannery O’Connor’s Portrait In ‘Prayer’

The great Flannery O’Connor. A newly discovered book gives a rare glimpse of the deeply Catholic writer and the artist as a young woman.

Guests

W.A. Sessions, professor of English emeritus at Georgia State University, editor of Flannery O’Connor’s “A Prayer Journal.” Author of “Henry Howard, the Poet Early of Surrey,” “Francis Bacon,” and “A Shattering Of Glass.”

Paul Elie, senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs at Georgetown University. Author of “The LIfe You Save May Be Your Own: An American Pilgrimage” and “Reinventing Bach.”

Carlene Bauer, author of “Frances and Bernard” and “Not That Kind of Girl.”

From Tom’s Reading List

Virginia Quarterly Review: God’s Grandeur: The Prayer Journal of Flannery O’Connor — “We know what O’Connor wanted for her fiction, but it is less clear what she wanted for her soul, because she does not confess to it other than obliquely. In the letters, when she advises Hester on prayer, she does admit to some extravagant petitioning. ‘It’s only trying to see straight and it’s the least you can set yourself to do, the least you can ask for,’ she writes. ‘You ask God to let you see straight and write straight. I read somewhere that the more you asked God, the more impossible what you asked, the greater glory you were giving Him. This is something I don’t fail to practice, although not with the right motives.’ But she does not tell Hester what impossible things she demands.”

Slate: The Prayers of Flannery O’Connor – “ I’m jealous of Flannery O’Connor, though she’s been dead nearly 50 years. I envy her not only because she was brilliant, the maker of astoundingly original and subversive works of art, but because she believed in God. She believed in the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. She believed in the Redemption, and Life Everlasting. She believed, with an unerring rigor, in the supernatural, and that God’s grace could open up upon us at our most dire moments and, if we accepted its gift, make us—fleetingly at least—better beings.”

The Atlantic: The Passion of Flannery O’Connor — “Iowa was where spiky, brainy Mary Flannery O’Connor from Milledgeville, Georgia, became Flannery O’Connor, writer. Arriving in 1945 as a postgraduate student at the University of Iowa, she promptly homed in on the creative-writing classes run by the poet Paul Engle. Women were a minority at the time: by 1946, more than half of Engle’s pupils were returning servicemen, many of them writing stories about their experiences during the war. On the surface, as O’Connor’s biographer, Brad Gooch, tells it in Flannery, she was a quiet but significant classroom presence: “’She scared the boys to death with her irony,’ remembered one visiting lecturer, Andrew Lytle.”

Read An Excerpt From “A Prayer Journal” By Flannery O’Connor

October 13 2013

23:21

4. Ken McLeod | The Naked Monk

Stephen Schettini in conversation with Ken McLeod about whether Buddhism matters today http://www.thenakedmonk.com/2013/09/21/4-ken-mcleod/

October 07 2013

04:07

Oct 2013 GenCon - Sat AM - Monson

Read, watch, and listen to the addresses from October 2013 General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. http://www.lds.org/general-conference/sessions/2013/10?lang=eng

August 20 2013

18:19

To The Best of Our Knowledge: Higher Consciousness

Suppose neuroscientists map the billions of neural circuits in the human brain....are we any closer to cracking the great existential mysteries - like meaning, purpose or happiness? Scientists, contemplatives and religious thinkers are now exploring the connections between neuroscience and contemplative practice, and creating a new science of mindfulness. http://ttbook.org/book/higher-consciousness

August 19 2013

14:36

Folge 092: Hyper Hyper! Es läuft ganz schön zäh!

Konna und Markus fühlten sich auf der großen Brüllaffencouch so allein, deswegen haben wir Herr Martinsen kurzfristig gefragt, ob er uns nicht Gesellschaft leisten mag. Erfreulicherweise stimmte er zu und so konnten wir in etwas über einer Stunde viele, schöne […] http://www.bruellaffencouch.de/2013/08/14/folge-092-hyper-hyper-es-laeuft-ganz-schoen-zaeh/

August 06 2013

05:45

Marshall McLuhan, man of faith | ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Marshall McLuhan was a committed Christian. How did he come to his faith and did it influence his ideas? And has his work any meaning for the Church today? http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/encounter/marshall-mcluhan-man-of-faith/2920266
05:41

Debate on the Existence of God: Bertrand Russell v. Fr. Frederick Copleston

BBC Radio Third Programme Recording January 28, 1948. BBC Recording number T7324W. This is an excerpt from the full broadcast from cassette tape A303/5 Open University Course, Problems of Philosophy Units 7-8. Older than 50 years, out of UK/BBC copyright.
05:32

Point of Inquiry

Jonathan Haidt: The Righteous Mind -- Why is it that some of us are religious, some of us not... some of us liberal, some of us not? If you've been paying attention, then by now you might have noticed that this doesn't really have a lot to do with the intellectual validity of religious, or irreligious, or liberal, or conservative ideas. So what causes it? And why can't we all get along? To get at this, Point of Inquiry invited on a scholar and thinker who has become famous for his scientific approach to this question—Jonathan Haidt, author of the new book The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion. Jonathan Haidt is a professor of social psychology at the University of Virginia, and a visiting professor of business ethics at the NYU-Stern School of Business. Haidt's research examines the intuitive foundations of morality, and how morality varies across cultures. He is the author of The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom, and he and his collaborators conduct research at the website YourMorals.org.
05:25

God and the Brain: What neuroscience can teach us about people and God

Resources for Churches from the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion http://testoffaith.com/resources/resource.aspx?id=625
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