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February 26 2014

23:09

January 30 2014

16:33

Asana: Productivity is sexy again - Chris Van Patten

A while back (in the second episode, in fact) I covered the productivity/todo list app TeuxDeux, a delightful tool that helps you manage your todo lists, with a focus on only essential features. I still love TeuxDeux, but as my team and business has grown since then, I needed to upgrade to something with more power. Enter Asana. Asana, a free and powerful productivity tool for individuals and teams Asana is a delightful, downright sexy (gasp!) solution for teams and individuals looking to level up their task management. It’s all in the “cloud”, and you can access your tasks from anywhere—phones, desktops, and tablets. Asana lets me track tasks that need completing, assign them to team members, discuss the tasks, and more. You can set deadlines, add tags, subtasks, and so much more. As always, the audio and transcription are below. Asana: Productivity is sexy again — Audio player Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 5:44 — 5.3MB) Asana: Productivity is sexy again — Transcription Hello and welcome to yet another episode of Wrapp Up. This week I want to talk about productivity apps, the one that I’ve chosen to use specifically. So if you’re a listener of Not a Real Job, which is my other podcast with my pal Joel Kelly, if you’re not you should be. If you are, you might remember on a recent episode, episode 12, which is free on the Not a real Job website – you can google that – we talked a little bit about our productivity apps and what we use to manage our to-do list. One thing that I mentioned was I was having a hard time finding an app that I could use with my team so I could keep track of projects that my team was working on for me or different tasks that they were handling and things like that. However, I found one, quickly after I started googling around and asking for recommendations in that podcast episode and found Asana. I’ve used Asana before, maybe a year or two ago, right around the time that it first opened up to the public. And it was okay, but I didn’t really get it. And the reason then is because I was mainly working on things by myself. But now with the team Asana makes so much sense. Basically it is a shared to-do list that you can do with anyone, whether they have their own task list or anything like that, they can integrate very easily into the Asana workflow. So members of my team, even though they might be tracking their own tasks separately, this is a way for us to all to go, dive in head first, and manage things together, basically the concept of teams, which are different groups of people working on certain projects. For example, I have a Van Patten media team and within that team I can have a bunch of projects. So I’ve got projects for client work, things like our server workflow that we’re working on, things like that. They each have their own project and I can invite my team members in per a project or the whole team to see everything that the company is working on. I go with that later approach. I just let everyone see everything. So we’re on the same page. If there was an instance where I had a one-time contractor come in, I can easily just say they can only see this project. So you create these projects and then you go and you just add bullet point to-do items. It’s super easy. They’ve got tons of keyboard shortcuts and it’s all very natural. You type your to-do list, you hit Enter, and it starts a new one. Backspace is going delete that to-do item. So it’s awesome. And then you can also do even more with these to-do items. You can add in a due date. You can put tags in there. Each to-do item can actually have sub to-do items. You can have maybe a big task like “Finish the design for the media page” and then within that that’s going to be a separate task, a subtask, “Work on the photo section,” “Work on the video section,” or whatever the case might be. You can do file attachments and you can comment on these items, you can provide a description, so you’re basically building many discussion areas and many multimedia areas around specific tasks in your to-do list. That’s so cool. Already I’ve only been using it for a couple of days now relatively speaking but I already find that I have a much better sense of what’s going on in my company. You can assign tasks to people. So I can say a certain task “I want this to be handled by my assistant.” Great, I can go in there, type her name in the box and it’s super easy. She gets a notification. I get a notification because I’m following that task. So it will show up in my to-do list inbox every time she adds a comment, or marks it finished, or uploads a file there. That will show up very easily. It’s also great because it integrates with email, so if you’re already a big email user and you do you everything in your inbox Asana can send you notifications and you can reply to to-do items directly from your inbox. It’s so great. You can manage your own stuff for your personal projects, your company’s projects. It’s just super fantastic and it’s easy. They’ve got a bunch of iPhone apps out there using their API. I like Tappsana, T-A-P-P-S-A-N-A, but there are a lot of choices out there. So that is Asana, give it a look. Asana.com. A-S-A-N-A.com. Now I still use to-do teuxdeux.com for some of my own personal things, but I am finding that I’m switching into Asana more and more when I have these personal projects that I want to work on. It’s just nice to keep things a little more organized. So I recommend checking out Asana. It’s super fast. It’s 3 up to 15 users. Really it can’t be beaten. All right, I’ve been Chris Van Patten. This has been Wrapp Up. http://www.chrisvanpatten.com/asana-sexy-productivity

January 07 2014

23:35

Art of the Exploit: An Introduction to Critical Engineering

In this lecture Julian will introduce projects and interventions made by himself and others that foreground Engineering, rather than Art, in the creative and critical frame, offering highly public insights into the hidden mechanisms and power struggles within our technical environment. Projects such as the Transparency Grenade, Packetbruecke and Newstweek will be covered in detail. Art has long been celebrated as an important frame for critical reflection upon contemporary life. In the post-industrial era however, complex tools, formal languages and hidden infrastructure increasingly influence how we communicate, move and remember; now an inextricable part of our Environment. So it follows that to ignore the languages and ideas that comprise engineering - from Computer Networking and Programming to BioTechnology and Electronics - is to become unable to describe, and thus critically engage, the world we live in. While this presents a challenge for the traditional artist, it is one that an engineer not working in service to science and industry - a Critical Engineer - is able to meet. In this lecture Julian will introduce projects and interventions made by himself and others that foreground Engineering, rather than Art, in the creative and critical frame, offering highly public insights into the hidden mechanisms and power struggles within our technical environment. Projects such as the invasive Transparency Grenade, Packetbruecke (a location-distorting tree of 802.11 radios) and Newstweek (a wall plug that allows the owner to manipulate news headlines read on wireless hotspots) will be introduced in detail. http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5440.html Day: 2013-12-28 Start time: 21:45 Duration: 01:00 Room: Saal 2 Track: Art & Beauty Language: en
23:30

THE DATABASE NATION, a.k.a THE STATE OF SURVEILLANCE

23rd of December 2008 was a sad day in India for civil liberties. On this day, The Indian Parliament passed the "The Information Technology (Amendment) Act" with no debate in the House, which effectively means is that the government of India now has the power to monitor all digital communications in the country without a court order or a warrant. The "world's largest democracy" strongly leaning towards becoming a surveillance state raises many questions and poses severe challenges for free speech and economic justice in India and globally. This talk will map and review the current political, socio-cultural and legal landscape of mass-surveillance, data protection and censorship in India and analyse how it ties in to the global landscape of surveillance and censorship. It will also aim to create a discussion space to investigate the deeper effects of these so called "welfare" projects and how citizen-led movements can drive the state towards stronger data protection and privacy laws. Section 69 of the act states, "Section 69 empowers the Central Government/State Government/ its authorized agency to intercept, monitor or decrypt any information generated, transmitted, received or stored in any computer resource if it is necessary or expedient so to do in the interest of the sovereignty or integrity of India, defence of India, security of the State, friendly relations with foreign States or public order or for preventing incitement to the commission of any cognizable offence or for investigation of any offence". What this effectively means is that the government of India now has the power to monitor all digital communications in the country without a court order or a warrant. Since then, India has gone on to setup several projects which leverage technology to freely collect, mine, share and commoditize citizen data, resulting in a massive intelligence network. These include the world’s largest biometric ID scheme (Aadhaar/UID), the Central Monitoring System(CMS), the Telephone Call Interception System (TCIS), a DNA data bank and the National Intelligence Grid (NATGRID). The "world's largest democracy" strongly leaning towards becoming a surveillance state raises many questions and poses severe challenges for free speech and economic justice, not just in India but globally. This talk will map and review the current political, socio-cultural and legal landscape of mass-surveillance, data protection and censorship in India and analyse how it ties in to the global landscape of surveillance and censorship. It will also aim to create a discussion space to investigate the deeper effects of these so called "welfare" projects and how citizen-led movements can drive the state towards stronger data protection and privacy laws. ABOUT THE SPEAKER Kaustubh Srikanth is a hactivist, technologist and researcher based between Berlin and Bangalore. He is one of the lead organisers of the annual Open Data Camp in India and currently works as the Head of Technology at Tactical Tech (https://tacticaltech.org), an international NGO working to enable the effective use of information for progressive social change. http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5421.html Day: 2013-12-30 Start time: 14:00 Duration: 01:00 Room: Saal 2 Track: Ethics, Society & Politics Language: en

January 02 2014

02:24

Why Headscape Chose Drupal with Ian Luckraft - Modules Unraveled Podcast | Modules Unraveled

Headscape Before we jump into it, I want to get a little background on Headscape, so that people know where you’re coming from. What kind of sites do Headscape typically work on? How big is Headscape? What other technologies do you guys build with? What was the driving factor behind going open source? What’s your role at Headscape? What do you do day-to-day? Why Drupal Paul and Marcus mentioned on the Boagworld Podcast that Headscape has put out a couple of Drupal sites recently. Which ones are those? Since you guys aren’t a Drupal-only shop, why was Drupal the right choice for these projects? Are you contributing anything back to Drupal.org? What problems have you encountered using Drupal? How did using Drupal make the development process easier or harder? Where do you guys host your sites? Questions from Twitter Ted Bowman What type of projects or project aspects will make you choose another system besides Drupal? What make you choose WP? Custom Coded? nickthorley Could you ask if Ian sees wordpress as inferior / used for different types of projects than drupal. nickthorley Why not use drupal for all projects and drop wordpress / custom builds nickthorley Would be interested to know what drupal version they use and when they will consider 8 - 12 months or longer nickthorley Would be interested to know about their development process from dev to live NodeSquirrel Ad Have you heard of/used NodeSquirrel? Use "StartToGrow" it's a 12-month free upgrade from the Start plan to the Grow plan. So, using it means that the Grow plan will cost $5/month for the first year instead of $10. (10 GB storage on up to 5 sites) http://modulesunraveled.com/podcast/090-why-headscape-chose-drupal-ian-luckraft-modules-unraveled-podcast

July 04 2013

12:28

Episode 10 - Side Projects with Dan Eden

An in-depth discussion on the latest tooling, workflow and best practices for frontend developers http://upfrontpodcast.com/2013/03/28/episode10.html

July 18 2011

03:28

The Hack/Phreak History Primer

In 2008 2600 is 24 years old, the computer bulletin board system is a 30 year relic, and a good number of attendees of HOPE were not born when some events of the "modern" era of computers and hacking began. Historian Jason Scott of textfiles.com presents a quick primer of a large part of the basics of hacking and phreaking history, touching on those sometimes obscure or hilarious subjects that may have escaped notice in a Web 2.0 world.

August 30 2010

15:20

ISBW #153 – interview with Mary Robinette Kowal Interview : The Murverse

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