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February 12 2014

07:07

TMS 039: Pitching Your Product to the Press with Dan Frakes | Think, Make, Sell.

Dan Frakes is a senior editor for Macworld and I invited him to talk about what product developers need to know about how the media works. While Dan’s point of view is from within the world of Apple-related products, you should be able to apply his advice to your particular industry. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download as .mp3Subscribe in iTunesSubscribe to podcast directlyListen with Stitcher Takeaway Points Keep in mind that larger news outlets may have a policy of not reviewing beta versions of apps. Smaller personal blogs often like to publish a review of a product on the day it launches. Be sure to contact them well in advance. Contacting the right journalists one by one will get you better results than submitting your press release to PR sites. When you send out a press release via email, make sure your subject line clearly states what the email is about. You can be witty or funny in your press releases, but don’t forget to include all the facts. Sending your press release to the right people within the right media outlets requires some research, but will pay off with better response rates. Don’t send PR email asking of the recipient wants more info. Just send them the info outright. When writing a press release, put a short summary at the top. That way the recipient can quickly decide if he or she is interested. Before sending out review units of your product, check with the recipient first if she’s interested. It will save you money and both your and the journalist’s time. If your product requires a longer time to be reviewed properly, take that into account when you plan your launch. Make sure to thoroughly test the review units before you send them out. A faulty unit or buggy app will delay the review process and possibly result in a bad rating. Don’t send out your press release around big events in your market or industry. These are the busiest times for the media and your chances of getting noticed are slim. Send out your press release well before, but not too long in advance of the launch. Something between a couple of days and 1–2 weeks. If you employ a PR professional, make sure they know your product or service well and can answer any questions that might come up. Set up a press page on your website with high-res product photos, a manual, videos and any info that might be interesting or useful for the media. Don’t call the person you sent your press release to on the phone to ask if they received your email. Where you can find Dan: Dan at Macworld @danfakes Macworld’s contact page IDG editorial team Things mentioned on the show Screencasts Online Mac Gems The Prompt prMac PRWeb Dan’s PR Tips Chris Breen on PR Done Wrong http://thinkmakesell.com/2014/02/tms-039-pitching-your-product-press-dan-frakes/

December 30 2013

05:08

Glenn Greenwald's 30C3 Keynote

Yesterday in Hamburg, Glenn Greenwald gave an astounding, must-watch keynote address to the gathered hackers at the 30th Chaos Communications Congress, or 30C3 (Greenwald starts at 4:36). Greenwald excoriated the press for failing to hold the world's leaders to account, describing what he did with the Snoweden leaks as challenge to the journalistic status quo as well as the political status quo. This is a leaping-off point for an extended riff on the active cooperation between the press and the national security apparatus, an arrangement calculated to give the appearance of oversight on surveillance activities without any such oversight (for example, BBC reporter expressed shock when he said that the role of the press should be to root out lies from senior spies, saying that generals and senior officials would ever lie to the public). Greenwald draws a connection between private companies and spying, expressing hope that Internet giants will finally understand that their profitability is endangered by their collaboration with spies. He describes these companies as having "unparalleled power" to curb state spying. He exhorted the hackers at 30C3 to do their best to make the Internet as secure for its users as possible, saying that without their contributions, all is lost. He urges them to strike back at Silicon Valley intelligence collaborators like Palantir, who pose as hip and technie to attract bright young people to help with their mission to attack privacy. The whole speech is important; it praises Chelsea Manning, Wikileaks, and Daniel Ellsberg, as well as other brave whistelblowers, and said that the Snowden project built on their work. He said that the heavy-handed attacks on whistleblowers by the US government have only revealed the state's corruption and inspired more insiders to go public. Notably, Greenwald revealed that the NSA and GCHQ are spying on in-flight Internet service, something that had not been revealed to date. The audio is already on Soundcloud, and I've extracted the audio as an MP3 and put it on the Internet Archive (MP3). Keynote Glenn Greenwald 30C3 http://boingboing.net/2013/12/28/glenn-greenwalds-must-watch.html

December 28 2013

17:25

Glenn Greenwald's must-watch 30C3 keynote - Boing Boing

Yesterday in Hamburg, Glenn Greenwald gave an astounding, must-watch keynote address to the gathered hackers at the 30th Chaos Communications Congress, or 30C3 (Greenwald starts at 4:36). Greenwald excoriated the press for failing to hold the world's leaders to account, describing what he did with the Snoweden leaks as challenge to the journalistic status quo as well as the political status quo. This is a leaping-off point for an extended riff on the active cooperation between the press and the national security apparatus, an arrangement calculated to give the appearance of oversight on surveillance activities without any such oversight (for example, BBC reporter expressed shock when he said that the role of the press should be to root out lies from senior spies, saying that generals and senior officials would ever lie to the public). Greenwald draws a connection between private companies and spying, expressing hope that Internet giants will finally understand that their profitability is endangered by their collaboration with spies. He describes these companies as having "unparalleled power" to curb state spying. He exhorted the hackers at 30C3 to do their best to make the Internet as secure for its users as possible, saying that without their contributions, all is lost. He urges them to strike back at Silicon Valley intelligence collaborators like Palantir, who pose as hip and technie to attract bright young people to help with their mission to attack privacy. The whole speech is important; it praises Chelsea Manning, Wikileaks, and Daniel Ellsberg, as well as other brave whistelblowers, and said that the Snowden project built on their work. He said that the heavy-handed attacks on whistleblowers by the US government have only revealed the state's corruption and inspired more insiders to go public. Notably, Greenwald revealed that the NSA and GCHQ are spying on in-flight Internet service, something that had not been revealed to date. The audio is already on Soundcloud, and I've extracted the audio as an MP3 and put it on the Internet Archive (MP3). Keynote Glenn Greenwald 30C3 http://boingboing.net/2013/12/28/glenn-greenwalds-must-watch.html

September 16 2013

14:49

MIT Press Podcasts | The MIT Press | Ep.37 "Small, Gritty, and Green."

Catherine Tumber, a journalist and historian, is the author of American Feminism and the Birth of New Age Spirituality: Searching for the Higher Self, 1875–1915. She is a Research Affiliate in the Community Innovators Lab in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning.

April 21 2011

21:42

SXSW: Intrigue Me: Writing Compelling Content

Presentation by Stephanie Hay at SXSW 2011. Although the web as a medium - and the web industry in general - promotes a somewhat informal community culture, its standards are absolute. Competition continues to evolve our definition of "exceptional" in order to efficiently separate the pioneers from the posers. But when it comes to content, are the boundaries still too informal? Have we been so focused on conceiving, designing, developing, and marketing the most mind-blowing ideas that we're apathetic to (correctly) adding a space between "log" and "in". I say, no way Jose (The question is, do you? And who is Jose, anyway?) Since designers and developers have been busy creating intensely standards-based work, it's understandable that they haven't necessarily kept sharp on their written word. But without the universal nature of black-and-white text to complement an online portfolio or describe a unique application, a reader is left alone to categorize, digest, and decide: am I intrigued enough to *do* something? In this session, I'll discuss ways in which web specialists can write compelling, credible content that piques interest and encourages action from readers. Attendees will leave with tips to elevate their content game -- whether they're aiming to more successfully write dynamic resumes and cover letters, describe their work in creative portfolios, guide users through enjoyable web interfaces, or convey value to gain one more paying subscriber. http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_IAP5783

July 21 2010

12:02

Rebooting The News #58

June 30 2010

00:28

Rebooting The News #57

June 15 2010

14:00

Obama’s Crackdown on Press Leaks

President Obama is coming down hard on leaks to the press – prosecuting even more aggressively than predecessor George W. Bush. We look at the leaks and the crackdown.
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