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February 04 2014

22:11

04: Going Behind the Scenes of Nancy Duarte’s Popular TED Talk

Nancy DuarteEver watched a TED talk and wondered how the presenter nailed it? There is a great deal of preparation and rehearsal that goes into these—I’m sure you can imagine. Presentation guru and bestselling author Nancy Duarte, shares the stories behind her popular TED talk titled The Secret Structure of Great Talks. In this interview, we pull back the curtain to see how Nancy crafted this particular high stakes presentation. Nancy Duarte is a Living Legend She laughed when I called her this in our interview, but I’m totally for real. Nancy has authored several definitive sources on presentation design, including Slide:ology and Resonate. Some very incredible people have even commented on how much her work has impacted them. Nancy Duarte is the CEO of Duarte, a presentation design studio that works with some big name corporations and influential thought leaders. If your presentation is high stakes, Duarte is the team you call. Wanna Know What We Talked About? • What to do when your talk is high stakes. • How to start with raw concepts and shape them for a presentation. • Building a certain kind of key moment into your content. • Why you should combine data and facts with stories and emotions. • One tiny tip for rehearsing that will help you not sound robotic on stage. For all the specifics, watch this video: Podcast: Play in new window | Download Question Just For You… Have you EVER had to give a high stakes presentation? I’d really, really love to hear from you. Tell us how it went in the comments and if you would have changed anything. Grab One of Nancy’s Books Slide:ology by Nancy DuarteResonate by Nancy Duarte Two Instant Bonuses! 1. Didn’t take notes while watching this awesome interview? We’ve got you covered! Download the PDF of Nancy’s key takeaways right here. 2. Nancy wrote a helpful blog post after her TED talk that provides a high-level breakdown of her preparation for the talk. Check that out here. Reminder: Referral Contest {Closed} You do not want to pass on this contest opportunity. Win $1,000 worth of presentation and speaking training from WhatTheSpeak.com and the SCORRE Conference. The competition ends August 8, 2013—so act now! Details can be found here. Have You Subscribed Yet? If you’re loving these interviews and haven’t subscribed yet, get on the list to be updated when new interviews go live. You can sign up below… If you enjoyed this interview, sign up for free updates. http://whatthespeak.com/nancy-duarte/

March 18 2012

15:04

Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012. Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there's a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save. http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

January 29 2012

00:03

Annalee Newitz - Your Business Plan Is Science Fiction – And That's a Good Thing

Just two decades ago, the Web and public internet were the stuff of science fiction. Creators like William Gibson, who coined the term "cyberspace" in his novel Neuromancer, helped define the terms of social life online, as well as inspiring many of the inventions (like smartphones) that we take for granted. But what is today's science fiction telling us about where our technology will go tomorrow? I'll talk about the stories today's scifi creators are telling about the Web and internet, and how their ideas create a fantastical map of what people are seeking in their online lives. Fiction – And That's a Good Thing http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/annalee-newitz/your-business-plan-science-fiction-and-s-good-thin/

January 03 2012

07:52

Open Source Rockets

Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today. With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407
01:05

Open Source Rockets

Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today. With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407
00:58

Hacking Space Exploration by Ariel Waldman

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration. As technology shifts from a means of passive consumption to active creation, people are collaborating on a massive scale. The endeavor of Spacehack.org is to transform that into more of a community, so that space hackers can easily connect and interact. Amateurs were once considered to be at the crux of scientific discovery, but over time have been put on the sidelines. Despite this, citizen science is witnessing a renaissance. Agencies such as NASA no longer have a monopoly on the global space program and more participatory projects are coming to life to harness the power of open collaboration around exploring space on a faster schedule. Instead of complaining about where our jetpack is, we can now demand to figure out how to take an elevator to space . And, while you still can’t own a CubeSat as easily as an iPod, you can join a SEDSAT-2 team and learn how to engineer one. There’s also GalaxyZoo , which opened up a data set containing a million galaxies imaged by a robotic telescope. Why projects such as these are important is because robots are actually kind of dumb. Humans are able to make classifications that well-programmed machines can’t. Currently, 200,000 humans are identifying over 250,000 galaxies. If tinkering with spacecrafts is more your speed, the Google Lunar X PRIZE is a competition to send robots to the moon. However, you don’t need to be a robotics engineer to participate. Team FREDNET , the first open source competitor, is open for anyone to join. While the concept of open source has resonated around the world and beyond, there is still much education to be done. NASA and the ESA have made large quantities of their data open, but have yet to facilitate developer communities that allow for active contribution to the code rather than just feedback on finding bugs. Spacehack.org , a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, was created for this reason, among others. Many of these projects are buried in old government websites or do not clearly communicate how someone can get involved. It is with great hope that it will not only encourage the creation of more participatory space projects, but also urge existing ones to embrace the social web. http://lanyrd.com/2010/osbridge/sxzh/

December 31 2011

09:31

20 Minutes d’approfondissement sur le revenu de base

la seconde partie de ma discussion avec Stanislas Jourdan 20 minutes autours du revenu de vie.
09:30

26 Minutes de présentation du revenu de base

26 minutes de discussions avec Stanislas Jourdan autours du revenu de vie.

August 26 2011

22:57

A Tale of Two Teams: A CEO’s Path to Agile

Is it easier to transform an existing culture to agile or build one from scratch? Menlo Innovations’ CEO Richard Sheridan will share two tales of Agile transformation. The first occurred when Sheridan was a VP of a 30-year old technology company and he transformed his existing team by adopting Extreme Programming. The second occurred two years later, when he chose entrepreneurship and started a new company using these same practices. True Agile adoption is hard. This talk will explore three barriers to Agile transformation: the executive team, the tech team, and Sheridan himself.

July 13 2011

08:06

TED: Richard Dawkins on militant atheism

Richard Dawkins urges all atheists to openly state their position -- and to fight the incursion of the church into politics and science. A fiery, funny, powerful talk. http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_dawkins_on_militant_atheism.html

June 10 2011

08:27

Closing Keynote: Beyond the Mobile Gold Rush

The rise of smart devices like the iPhone and iPad has led to an application goldrush, with companies racing to stake their claim. In the early days we saw a few lucky pioneers strike gold, but like most gold rushes, the obvious targets were quickly depleted. Digital prospectors lured by the promise of gold are now arriving to find a very different market—one rife with competition and few obvious deposits to mine. Recent studies have shown that we tend to limit our usage to a few core applications and the bulk of apps never even get opened. So despite newspapers and magazines hailing the iPad as the saviour of the publishing industry, does it really make business sense to jump on the application bandwagon? If not, what are the alternatives? In this keynote, Andy Budd will look at the current state of the mobile web, how we got here and where we go next. He will explore the new opportunities that have opened up for the field of user experience design, but will caution that not every mobile experience needs to start with an app. http://www.iakonferenz.org/sessions/31

February 21 2011

23:49

Erin McKean redefines the dictionary

Is the beloved paper dictionary doomed to extinction? In this infectiously exuberant talk, leading lexicographer Erin McKean looks at the many ways today's print dictionary is poised for transformation. As the CEO and co-founder of new online dictionary Wordnik, Erin McKean is reshaping not just dictionaries, but how we interact with language itself. http://www.ted.com/talks/erin_mckean_redefines_the_dictionary.html

February 17 2011

10:14

Graham Hill: Why I'm a weekday vegetarian

We all know the arguments that being vegetarian is better for the environment and for the animals -- but in a carnivorous culture, it can be hard to make the change. Graham Hill has a powerful, pragmatic suggestion: Be a weekday veg. Graham Hill is the founder of TreeHugger.com; he travels the world to tell the story of sustainability.
10:13

Denis Dutton: A Darwinian theory of beauty

TED collaborates with animator Andrew Park to illustrate Denis Dutton's provocative theory on beauty -- that art, music and other beautiful things, far from being simply "in the eye of the beholder," are a core part of human nature with deep evolutionary origins. Denis Dutton is a philosophy professor and the editor of Arts & Letters Daily. In his book The Art Instinct, he suggests that humans are hard-wired to seek beauty. http://www.ted.com/talks/denis_dutton_a_darwinian_theory_of_beauty.html

November 23 2010

20:35

e-Learning Stuff » podcast

Me and James Clay discussing some of my recently written advice documents on digital media and other related e-learning stuff

October 25 2010

14:46

James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth. James Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org. http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-wrangling-time-the-form-and-future-of-the-book/

October 05 2010

20:07

Real Progressive Enhancement — FOWA 2010 London — Christian Heilmann

Presentation at the Future of Web Apps in London about HTML5. CSS3 and real progressive enhancement. Covers the use of YUI3 and Node.js to render JavaScript widgets server-side. http://www.archive.org/details/RealProgressiveEnhancement-Fowa2010London-ChristianHeilmann

July 03 2010

20:19

CSS3 Design with HTML5

As HTML5 and CSS3 gets written, browser vendors are already incorporating their new features allowing for greater design and functionality. However, some major browsers haven't. How should developers build for a constantly moving target? This panel discusses dealing with those older browsers and embracing new Web design technologies with practical HTML5 and CSS3 demonstrations. From http://sxsw.com/node/5013
10:21

Closing the gap between people’s online and real life social network – Paul Adams

From IA Summit 2010: In the next few years, the most successful social media experiences will be the ones that understand how our offline and online worlds connect and interact. But our tools are still crude. The good news is that despite the complexity involved in understanding human relationships, we can study offline and online communication and create design principles to support what we find. In his presentation, Paul Adams speaks about what he has learned from over two years of research into people’s online and offline relationships. From http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-10-day-2
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