Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

August 06 2012

15:22

.NET Rocks! 786 Bruce Lawson Has Responsive Web Design

At NDC, Carl and Richard talk to Bruce Lawson about responsive web design. Responsive web design from Bruce's point of view is web pages that are able to adjust to the browser and device that they are being viewed on. From the huge displays on desktop PCs to the tiny screens of smartphones, you can make your web pages work effectively! Bruce talks about some of the tools and libraries available to simplify responsive web design, so check out the links from the show! Born into the tech world when he was hastily delivered on a table in the London Science Museum, Bruce evangelises Open Web Standards for Opera. He co-authored Introducing HTML5, the first book on the subject, and was a member of the W3C Mobile Web Best Practices Working Group. Previously, he's been front-end technical lead for the Law Society and Solicitors Regulation Authority web sites, tutor to a princess' daughter in Thailand, a movie extra in Bombay, and a tarot card reader in Istanbul. He blogs at brucelawson.co.uk, drinks Guinness and is training for a blue belt in kickboxing. http://www.dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?showNum=786

March 13 2011

11:50

Robot Opera and Immortality

http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/03/07/robot-opera In the new robot opera, “Death and the Powers,” humans are history. So is flesh and blood- as ‘so over’ as the dinosaurs. The high-tech drama, composed by Tod Machover, tells the story of how one eccentric billionaire led the way, by refusing to die. He uploads himself – his mind – into the realm of digital immortality, and leaves his worldly body behind. Machover, known as “America’s most wired composer” and director of the Opera of the Future group at the MIT Media Lab, thinks of his character Simon Powers, as “a combination of Howard Hughes, Walt Disney and Bill Gates,” who rather than wanting to live forever, desired “to leave the world, but leave everything about himself here.”

November 22 2010

15:13

Alex Ross | Listen to This

New Yorker music critic Alex Ross has received two American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers Deems Taylor Awards for music criticism and a Letter of Distinction from the American Music Center for his contributions to contemporary music. His internationally bestselling book, The Rest is Noise earned the 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award and a 2008 Pulitzer Prize nomination. His second book is an expansive survey of the musical scene, ranging from classical music artists to pop sensations such as Frank Sinatra, Led Zeppelin, and Björk. (recorded 10/26/2010)

September 16 2010

16:14

Mondo Diablo Episode 272 is Bacchanalia Part IV: The Death of Some Guy

We end this Opus with the story of PDQ's actual composing period, his relationship with Prince Fred and his cousin, Betty-Sue Bach, his death and burial, and finally, an interview of Peter Schickele, the discoverer of PDQ, by Tom Snyder. I can only hope, in some small way, that these podcasts aided in bringing the truth about J.S. Bach's last and least son to the internet public.

September 10 2010

00:42

Mondo Diablo Episode 271 is Bacchanalia Part III: Oedipus Tex

This week, we see PDQ form a relationship with Prince Fred, and embark on a journey towards Wein Am-Rhein, where he will begin a musical career. We also hear from his unique musical instruments, and hear the opera, "Oedipus Tex."

September 02 2010

14:21

Mondo Diablo Episode 270 is Bacchanalia Part II: The Soused Period

I guess my math skills are pretty bad. There are FOUR installments to this Bachstravaganza, and this one brings us to about half done. Thank your lucky stars.

August 29 2010

19:42

Mondo Diablo Episode 269 is Bacchanalia Part I: The Last and Least

Welcome to the first part of a big three-parter! I have enjoyed Peter Schickele and his disovery, P.D.Q. Bach for, garsh, 25 years at least, for "Bob's" sake. Funny I haven't shared much with you yet. well, not so funny (yes, so funny). All of my music is on vinyl. So, I had to do an epic search and and epic emptying of my bank account to get some non-scratchy stuff. Of course, some of the scratchy stuff is inevitable. I listened to it a lot, because I was a nerd. A big nerd. I used to sing some of this stuff in school, because I knew people would have no idea what I was doing. And of course, they didn't give a shit, either. No worries.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl