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February 12 2014

19:14

Pundits, Hacks and Wonks | Grammar Grater | Minnesota Public Radio News

Grammar Grater™ is a weekly podcast about English words, grammar and usage for the Information Age. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/radio/podcasts/grammar_grater/archive/2009/04/23/

January 13 2014

16:02

Lexicon Valley: The historical present in Seinfeld and the novels of Charlotte Bronte

Listen to Lexicon Valley Episode No. 15: "Then Is Now, Now and Then." Do you ever catch yourself talking about past events in the present tense? Linguists call it the “historical present.” http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/07/lexicon_valley_the_historical_present_in_seinfeld_and_the_novels_of_charlotte_bronte.html

December 25 2013

01:57

Language Evolution, 2013

The year in language. Cronut. Vape. Twerk. Sharknado. We'll look at the language that went large in 2013.

December 24 2013

17:47

Episode 1: Introduction | The History of English Podcast

In this introductory episode, we look at the emergence of English as a global language and the evolution of the language from its Germanic origins. http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/07/31/episode-1-introduction/

November 26 2013

04:29

The mysterious roots of a homegrown language | KALW

By Liz Pfeffer and Kristina Loring A few hours north of San Francisco is the town of Boonville, nestled in the quaint Anderson Valley of Mendocino County. Like Silicon Valley, this place is http://kalw.org/post/mysterious-roots-homegrown-language

October 08 2013

15:49

Alice Gaby - on linguistics

Talk about the relevance of linguistics and implications for neuroscience

September 19 2013

06:01

A Taste of the Past - Episode 71 - Eat Your Words: A Culinary History of the English Language

What do beat, bean, and leek all have in common with each other? Find out on this week's episode A Taste of The Past where Linda goes into the history of food and culinary etymology with Ina Lipkowitz teacher of English literature and Biblical Studies at MIT and author of Words to Eat By. Discover the semantic shift in the word meat, the influence of the ancient Romans on plant breeds, and how much religious symbolism is based off food. Listen and become aware about how much food words have an impact on us. This episode is sponsored by The Hearst Ranch. http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/1752-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-71-Eat-Your-Words-A-Culinary-History-of-the-English-Language

July 28 2013

23:03

Spark • Internet Linguistics:€” Q&A with David Crystal

David Crystal is a world-renowned linguist. He’s the author of over 100 books, and an advocate of what he calls “Internet Linguistics" — an approach to understanding how we use language online. Nora Young interviewed David for Spark 220. This Q&A is a lightly edited version of that interview. http://sparkcbc.tumblr.com/post/52398439754/internet-linguistics-q-a-with-david-crystal

March 30 2013

18:42

Gay Marriage And The Evolving Language Of Love

August 31 2012

13:44

What’€™s a Hipster? - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

Get out your skinny jeans and pass the PBR! Martha and Grant discuss the definition of the word hipster. Also, what happens when you pull a brodie? And why do we describe something cheap or poorly made as cheesy? Also, sawbucks, shoestring budgets, the origins of bootlegging, and cabbie lingo, including the slang word bingo. http://www.waywordradio.org/whats-a-hipster/
13:42

A Roberta of Flax (full episode) - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

We have collective nouns for animals, like “a gaggle of geese,” “a pride of lions,” and “an exaltation of larks.” So why not collective nouns for plants? How about a “greasing of palms,” or a “pursing of tulips”? Also, the difference between further and farther, the proper use of crescendo, how Shakespeare sounded, and why a child’s runny nose is sometimes referred to as lamb’s legs. http://www.waywordradio.org/roberta-of-flax/
13:37

Strange Spelling Bee Words - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

Why do spelling bees include such bizarre, obsolete words as cymotrichous? Why is New York called the Big Apple? Also, the stinky folk medicine tradition called an asifidity bag, the surprising number of common English phrases that come directly from the King James Bible, three sheets to the wind, the term white elephant, in like Flynn, Australian slang, and what to call foam sleeve for an ice-cold beverage can. http://www.waywordradio.org/spelling-bee-words/

August 12 2012

09:08

All Sorts of Collective Nouns

Brian Suda interviews Drew Neil about the All Sorts project. They talk about the site's origins and how it has grown. Brian recalls the Moo cards that were used to promote the site, and Drew talks of the recent exhibition of screen printed collective noun illustrations in Edinburgh's Owl & Lion gallery.

August 10 2012

19:43

Lexicon Valley: How grammatical gender changes our thinking, and how English lost its genders. - Slate Magazine

Does talking about an object as masculine or feminine somehow cause us to think of it that way? In the second part of a Lexicon Valley series about language and gender, Bob Garfield and I discuss the fascinating research by Stanford psychologist Lera Boroditsky involving grammar and perception. We talk also about what may have happened to grammatical gender in English. That’s right, once upon a time we had grammatical gender too. But then we lost it. http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/05/lexicon_valley_how_grammatical_gender_changes_our_thinking_and_how_english_lost_its_genders_.html
19:43

Lexicon Valley: Seeking a gender neutral alternative to he and she. - Slate Magazine

In the third and final installment of our Lexicon Valley series about language and gender, Bob Garfield and I discuss the ongoing quest for a single, more equitable alternative to “he” and “she.” Since at least the 1850s, English speakers have made many unsuccessful attempts to introduce an epicene pronoun into the language. But University of Michigan professor Anne Curzan argues that we don’t need such a word, since we already have a perfectly acceptable, if controversial, alternative—just use “they.” Don’t like that solution? Maybe she’ll convince you. http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/05/lexicon_valley_seeking_a_gender_neutral_alternative_to_he_and_she_.html
19:42

The man who hunts for anachronisms in Mad Men, Downton Abbey, and Edith Wharton. - Slate Magazine

For period dramas like Downton Abbey and Mad Men, historical authenticity is crucial to the viewer experience. Vigilant designers work from photos to accurately recreate everything from kitchenware to hairstyles. But what about the dialogue?... http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/06/lexicon_valley_anachronisms_in_mad_men_downton_abbey_and_edith_wharton_.html

January 03 2012

15:28

June 20 2011

16:23

Endangered languages, lost knowledge and the future

Daniel Everett discusses the Pirahã and their language. The language has no words for numbers, no words for right and left and lacks any examples of recursion. This last trait forces us to rethink everything we thought we knew about language. The discussion of the Pirahã language itself is excellent, but Everett's discussion of why endangered languages need to be preserved is absolutely fascinating. His recommendations for preserving endangered languages include preserving natives speaker's land and their heath. He also recommends studying and documenting these languages over a long period of time, as he has done with the Pirahã language. From http://www.longnow.org/projects/seminars/ More information on this seminar is available at http://blog.longnow.org/2009/03/23/daniel-everett-endangered-languages-lost-knowledge-and-the-future/

April 26 2011

11:27

Point of Inquiry — George Lakoff

George Lakoff is a cognitive linguist at the University of California at Berkeley. But unlike many of his scientific peers, he's known as much for his work on politics as for his research. Lakoff the famed author of many books on why the left and right disagree about politics, including Moral Politics, Don't Think of an Elephant, Thinking Points, and most recently, The Political Mind: Why You Can't Understand 21st Century Politics with an 18th Century Brain. Throughout these works Lakoff has applied cognitive and linguistic analysis to our political rifts, and his ideas about "framing," "metaphor," and the different moral systems of liberals and conservatives have become very widely known and influential.

April 25 2011

20:13

Point of Inquiry — George Lakoff

George Lakoff is a cognitive linguist at the University of California at Berkeley. But unlike many of his scientific peers, he's known as much for his work on politics as for his research. Lakoff the famed author of many books on why the left and right disagree about politics, including Moral Politics, Don't Think of an Elephant, Thinking Points, and most recently, The Political Mind: Why You Can't Understand 21st Century Politics with an 18th Century Brain. Throughout these works Lakoff has applied cognitive and linguistic analysis to our political rifts, and his ideas about "framing," "metaphor," and the different moral systems of liberals and conservatives have become very widely known and influential.
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