Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

February 26 2014

13:57

February 23 2014

20:12

February 19 2014

21:46

February 17 2014

15:01

January 10 2014

00:25

2H2K Lawyer: Science Fiction Design, Artificial Labor, and Ubiquitous Interactive Machine Learning | Ideas For Dozens

December 20 2013

17:23

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. https://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

December 17 2013

09:33

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

December 16 2013

23:26

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/
03:01

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

October 03 2013

16:51

Smith v. Maryland | The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

Does the installation and use of a pen register constitute a search under the Fourth Amendment?
Tags: nsa spying law

September 17 2013

13:22

Stupid Laws and Smart Shoes

Erika and Gabe reminisce about SOPA and PIPA and review key considerations in running shoe selection.
Tags: law
13:15

New Penalties and First Marathons

In this first episode of Running from the Law, Erika Hall and Gabe Levine discuss some California legislation that could affect design shops and other small businesses, the joys of endurance training, hiring penalties, and Nip Guards.
Tags: law

July 15 2013

05:36

The Federalist Society: How Conservatives Took the Law Back from Liberals | Law and Disorder Radio, April 29, 2013

July 03 2013

21:41

Life of the Law on the legality of Lawyers Advertising on TV

Oddly, the history of "Have you been injured in an accident?" is one of the more fascinating chapters of American legal history.

June 25 2013

23:25

National Security Letters and Gag Orders

The most serious kind of subpoena - called a 'National Security Letter' - used to have a lifetime gag-order automatically attached. That is until Nicholas Merrill appealed his and won the right to talk about it. Despite 50,000 national security letters a year, there are only three organizations that have ever won the right to say they got one. In a segment that originally aired in January of 2011, Nick Merrill tells Bob why he's the exception and the rule.

September 02 2012

06:45

Ep. 25: Internet Jackassery with Davin Pavlas

Davin Pavlas (Potter and Pals) joins us to share stories about being jackasses on the internet. We also discuss gross breakfast, Legos, Dave's new nickname, and how Kasey ruined Davin's sex life. Davin plays Crack The Case and Law
06:45

Ep. 23: Pranks with Jen Bokoff

Jen Bokoff (Pre-Recorded Late Night) joins us to share stories about pranks. We also discuss horrible cat noises, scamming old people, the Penn State racquetball scandal, and inventing a dumb charity. Jen plays True Crime and Unbelievable Laws for LIFT.
06:44

Ep. 22: Embarrassment with Jessica Charlton

Jessica Charlton (If You're Feeling...) joins us to share stories about embarrassment. We also discuss ants fighting and committing crimes, how we pay our rent, "Shucky Darn!," and screwing up history. Jessica plays Crack The Case and Unbelievable Laws for March of Dimes.
06:44

Ep. 20: Band Camp with Jay Frosting

Jay Frosting (Pre-Recored Late Night) joins us to share stories from band camp. We also discuss pre-internet porn, bionic implants, albino bees, and finger-banging. Jay plays Crack The Case and the final version of Incomplete Crimes for Planned Parenthood.

August 03 2012

23:01

Cory Doctorow: The Coming Century of War Against Your Computer - The Long Now

Who governs digital trust? Doctorow framed the question this way: "Computers are everywhere. They are now something we put our whole bodies into---airplanes, cars---and something we put into our bodies---pacemakers, cochlear implants. They HAVE to be trustworthy." Sometimes humans are not so trustworthy, and programs may override you: "I can’t let you do that, Dave." (Reference to the self-protective insane computer Hal in Kubrick’s film "2001." That time the human was more trustworthy than the computer.) Who decides who can override whom? The core issues for Doctorow come down to Human Rights versus Property Rights, Lockdown versus Certainty, and Owners versus mere Users. Apple computers such as the iPhone are locked down---it lets you run only what Apple trusts. Android phones let you run only what you trust. Doctorow has changed his mind in favor of a foundational computer device called the "Trusted Platform Module" (TPM) which provides secure crypto, remote attestation, and sealed storage. He sees it as a crucial "nub of secure certainty" in your machine. If it’s your machine, you rule it. It‘s a Human Right: your computer should not be overridable. And a Property Right: "you own what you buy, even if it what you do with it pisses off the vendor." That’s clear when the Owner and the User are the same person. What about when they’re not? There are systems where we really want the authorities to rule---airplanes, nuclear reactors, probably self-driving cars ("as a species we are terrible drivers.") The firmware in those machines should be inviolable by users and outside attackers. But the power of Owners over Users can be deeply troubling, such as in matters of surveillance. There are powers that want full data on what Users are up to---governments, companies, schools, parents. Behind your company computer is the IT department and the people they report to. They want to know all about your email and your web activities, and there is reason for that. But we need to contemplate the "total and terrifying power of Owners over Users." Recognizing that we are necessarily transitory Users of many systems, such as everything involving Cloud computing or storage, Doctorow favors keeping your own box with its own processors and storage. He strongly favors the democratization and wide distribution of expertise. As a Fellow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (who co-sponsored the talk) he supports public defense of freedom in every sort of digital rights issue. "The potential for abuse in the computer world is large," Doctorow concluded. "It will keep getting larger." http://longnow.org/seminars/02012/jul/31/coming-century-war-against-your-computer/
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl