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July 28 2013

18:43

Singing to Save Garifuna | @pritheworld

James Lovell grew up in Belize and heard Garifuna spoken by his parents and grandparents. He didn't really want to speak the language until he heard music of a local musician. Now, James Lovell wants to spread the language of Garifuna through song. Reporter Nina Porzucki brings us his profile. http://www.theworld.org/2011/11/singing-to-save-garifuna/

July 14 2013

16:18

Legalese Aside, How Do We Talk About Race Nowadays?

March 30 2013

18:42

Gay Marriage And The Evolving Language Of Love

September 05 2012

16:12

Dancing In The Dark: The Intelligence of Bees

Bees are remarkable among insects. They can count, remember human faces, and communicate through dance routines performed entirely in the dark. But are they intelligent? Even creative? Bee aficionado Stephen Humphrey, along with a hive of leading bee researchers and scientists, investigates the mental lives of bees.

September 01 2012

18:25

PRI: To the Best of Our Knowledge

Cross Talk -- There's no English translation for the Dutch word "Gezellig."Are there things that can never be understood, expressed or experienced outside their home culture?We're wandering the unmarked maps of cultural translation!

August 31 2012

13:44

What’€™s a Hipster? - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

Get out your skinny jeans and pass the PBR! Martha and Grant discuss the definition of the word hipster. Also, what happens when you pull a brodie? And why do we describe something cheap or poorly made as cheesy? Also, sawbucks, shoestring budgets, the origins of bootlegging, and cabbie lingo, including the slang word bingo. http://www.waywordradio.org/whats-a-hipster/
13:42

A Roberta of Flax (full episode) - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

We have collective nouns for animals, like “a gaggle of geese,” “a pride of lions,” and “an exaltation of larks.” So why not collective nouns for plants? How about a “greasing of palms,” or a “pursing of tulips”? Also, the difference between further and farther, the proper use of crescendo, how Shakespeare sounded, and why a child’s runny nose is sometimes referred to as lamb’s legs. http://www.waywordradio.org/roberta-of-flax/
13:37

Strange Spelling Bee Words - A Way with Words, public radio's lively language show

Why do spelling bees include such bizarre, obsolete words as cymotrichous? Why is New York called the Big Apple? Also, the stinky folk medicine tradition called an asifidity bag, the surprising number of common English phrases that come directly from the King James Bible, three sheets to the wind, the term white elephant, in like Flynn, Australian slang, and what to call foam sleeve for an ice-cold beverage can. http://www.waywordradio.org/spelling-bee-words/

August 12 2012

09:08

All Sorts of Collective Nouns

Brian Suda interviews Drew Neil about the All Sorts project. They talk about the site's origins and how it has grown. Brian recalls the Moo cards that were used to promote the site, and Drew talks of the recent exhibition of screen printed collective noun illustrations in Edinburgh's Owl & Lion gallery.

August 10 2012

19:43

Lexicon Valley: How grammatical gender changes our thinking, and how English lost its genders. - Slate Magazine

Does talking about an object as masculine or feminine somehow cause us to think of it that way? In the second part of a Lexicon Valley series about language and gender, Bob Garfield and I discuss the fascinating research by Stanford psychologist Lera Boroditsky involving grammar and perception. We talk also about what may have happened to grammatical gender in English. That’s right, once upon a time we had grammatical gender too. But then we lost it. http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/05/lexicon_valley_how_grammatical_gender_changes_our_thinking_and_how_english_lost_its_genders_.html
19:43

Lexicon Valley: Seeking a gender neutral alternative to he and she. - Slate Magazine

In the third and final installment of our Lexicon Valley series about language and gender, Bob Garfield and I discuss the ongoing quest for a single, more equitable alternative to “he” and “she.” Since at least the 1850s, English speakers have made many unsuccessful attempts to introduce an epicene pronoun into the language. But University of Michigan professor Anne Curzan argues that we don’t need such a word, since we already have a perfectly acceptable, if controversial, alternative—just use “they.” Don’t like that solution? Maybe she’ll convince you. http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/05/lexicon_valley_seeking_a_gender_neutral_alternative_to_he_and_she_.html
19:42

The man who hunts for anachronisms in Mad Men, Downton Abbey, and Edith Wharton. - Slate Magazine

For period dramas like Downton Abbey and Mad Men, historical authenticity is crucial to the viewer experience. Vigilant designers work from photos to accurately recreate everything from kitchenware to hairstyles. But what about the dialogue?... http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/06/lexicon_valley_anachronisms_in_mad_men_downton_abbey_and_edith_wharton_.html

November 28 2011

15:38

'A Fish In Your Ear': What Gets Lost In Translation

Russian has a word for light blue and a word for dark blue, but no word for a general shade of blue. So when interpreters translate "blue" into Russian, they're forced to pick a shade. It's one of the many complexities of translation David Bellos explores in his new book, Is That a Fish in Your Ear? http://www.npr.org/2011/11/14/142309214/meaning-of-everything-often-lost-in-translation?sc=tw

September 16 2011

20:23

Wild birds talking! - ABC WA - Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)

Naturalist Martyn Robinson, has discovered that pet birds who have escaped into the bush have 'taught' their wild companions to speak. The words that the the once domesticated pets learned from humans can now be heard from the beaks of their wild cousins.
Tags: birds language

September 02 2011

23:08

Centenary Session 01 part C

In the Centenary Sessions Bob Dobbs and Andrew Chrystall dialogue on a variety of cultural outputs generated during the McLuhan Centenary celebrations. In this session Bob and Andrew discuss an article by Professor Robert K. Logan. Logan is a long-time friend and collaborator of McLuhan’s. He has authored a number of significant works including: The Poetry of Physics and the Physics of Poetry, The Alphabet Effect, The Sixth Language, and The Extended Mind. Logan has received several mentions during the MoMday Seminars, particularly in relation to his work on early alphabets and ancient writing systems.
23:06

Centenary Session 01 part B

In the Centenary Sessions Bob Dobbs and Andrew Chrystall dialogue on a variety of cultural outputs generated during the McLuhan Centenary celebrations. In this session Bob and Andrew discuss an article by Professor Robert K. Logan. Logan is a long-time friend and collaborator of McLuhan’s. He has authored a number of significant works including: The Poetry of Physics and the Physics of Poetry, The Alphabet Effect, The Sixth Language, and The Extended Mind. Logan has received several mentions during the MoMday Seminars, particularly in relation to his work on early alphabets and ancient writing systems.
23:04

Centenary Session 01 part A

In the Centenary Sessions Bob Dobbs and Andrew Chrystall dialogue on a variety of cultural outputs generated during the McLuhan Centenary celebrations. In this session Bob and Andrew discuss an article by Professor Robert K. Logan. Logan is a long-time friend and collaborator of McLuhan’s. He has authored a number of significant works including: The Poetry of Physics and the Physics of Poetry, The Alphabet Effect, The Sixth Language, and The Extended Mind. Logan has received several mentions during the MoMday Seminars, particularly in relation to his work on early alphabets and ancient writing systems.

July 19 2011

18:13

What The Word 'Compromise' Really Means : NPR

Linguist Geoff Nunberg says the compromises we refuse to make say the most about our character. "Sometimes we stand on principle for the heady satisfaction of showing that we can't be pushed around," he says. http://www.npr.org/2011/07/19/138468870/what-the-word-compromise-really-means

June 27 2011

16:33

The Closing Panel

Q&A featuring Tim Van Damme, Greg Wood, Veerle Pieters, Andy Clarke, and Brendan Dawes. Hosted by Simon Collison.
16:33

The Morning Panel

Q&A featuring Dan Rubin, Mark Boulton, Sarah Parmenter, Elliot Jay Stocks, and Jon Tan. Hosted by Simon Collison
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