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February 21 2014

00:33

February 09 2014

18:03

The History of English Podcast Episode 2: The Indo-European Discovery

The story of the discovery of the ancient language which gave rise to most of the languages of Europe, including English. http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/04/episode-2-the-indo-european-discovery-5/

January 31 2014

08:20

Dubravka - 360documentaries - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Dubravka is a refugee from Bosnia who is learning English but the politeness of our culture keeps confounding her. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/360/dubravka/5214680

January 23 2014

05:30

How We’re Talking, Like, Today

Verbal tics, and what they say about us. “I’m just saying.” “To tell you the truth.” “As far as I know.”

Beyond the typical

Beyond the typical “kids these days” complaint, plenty of other language trends crop up regardless of age. (Erin Nekervis / Creative Commons)

Guests

Elizabeth Bernstein, Bonds columnists for The Wall Street Journal. (@EbernsteinWSJ)

James Pennebaker, professor and chair of the department of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Author of “The Secret Life Of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us.”

Brandt Johnson, co-founder and principal of Syntaxis, a communications skills training firm in New York City. Author of “Presentation Skills For Business Professionals.”

Kenneth Baclawski, Jr., graduate student in linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.

From The Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Why Verbal Tee-Ups Like ‘To Be Honest’ Often Signal Insincerity – “Certain phrases just seem to creep into our daily speech. We hear them a few times and suddenly we find ourselves using them. We like the way they sound, and we may find they are useful. They may make it easier to say something difficult or buy us a few extra seconds to collect our next thought. Yet for the listener, these phrases are confusing. They make it fairly impossible to understand, or even accurately hear, what the speaker is trying to say.”

Edmonton Journal: Why all the cray-cray words? – “Have I gone cray-cray, or has English become just a little too adorbs? Peeps are buying prezzies and making restaurant rezzies, they’re sharing email addies and eating bacon sammies with their swag boyfs. They’re getting jeal cos their hubs chatted up some hottie. They’re tweeting selfies and shelfies and drelfies, liking fails, hearting pics from their BFF’s winter vacay. Totes ridic! Obvs I get that language changes. ”

New York Times: They’re, Like, Way Ahead of the Linguistic Currrrve — “The idea that young women serve as incubators of vocal trends for the culture at large has longstanding roots in linguistics. As Paris is to fashion, the thinking goes, so are young women to linguistic innovation.”

January 13 2014

16:02

Lexicon Valley: The historical present in Seinfeld and the novels of Charlotte Bronte

Listen to Lexicon Valley Episode No. 15: "Then Is Now, Now and Then." Do you ever catch yourself talking about past events in the present tense? Linguists call it the “historical present.” http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2012/07/lexicon_valley_the_historical_present_in_seinfeld_and_the_novels_of_charlotte_bronte.html

January 04 2014

00:23

December 25 2013

01:57

Language Evolution, 2013

The year in language. Cronut. Vape. Twerk. Sharknado. We'll look at the language that went large in 2013.

December 24 2013

17:47

Episode 1: Introduction | The History of English Podcast

In this introductory episode, we look at the emergence of English as a global language and the evolution of the language from its Germanic origins. http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/07/31/episode-1-introduction/
08:31

Language Evolution, 2013

The year in language. Cronut. Vape. Twerk. Sharknado. We’ll look at the language that went large in 2013.

Miley Cyrus performs on NBC's

Miley Cyrus performs on NBC’s “Today” show on Monday, Oct. 7, 2013 in New York. The pop star’s dance moves lead to one of 2013′s most widely-discussed words, “twerk.” (AP)

Guest

John McWhorter, linguist, associate professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University and contributing editor at The New Republic. Author of “The Language Hoax: Why The World Looks The Same In Any Language,” “What Language Is (And What It Isn’t And What It Could Be),” “Our Magnificent Bastard Tonuge: The Untold Story of English” and “Defining Creole.”

From Tom’s Reading List

The New Republic: This American Dictionary Is Full of Words You’ve Never Heard Before — “We moderns process American English differently than women who wore slips, or the men who were warning them about their expsosure. These days, there is plenty of interest in non-standard language—but today, America slangs together more. Americanisms—geographically promiscuous items such as veggietwerkselfie, and ‘My bad!’—interest us more than regionalisms such as that people call smoking marijuana smoking out on the west coast but smoking up on the east.”

The Wall Street Journal: The Most Memorable Words of 2013 — “What’s the political word of the year? For months journalists couldn’t settle on how to describe the rollout of ObamaCare. ‘Failed,’ ‘disastrous,’ ‘unsuccessful.’ In the past few weeks they’ve settled on ‘botched.’ References to the botched rollout have appeared in this paper, The Hill, NBC, Fox, NPR, the New Republic, the Washington Post and other media outlets.”

The Boston Globe: Words of the Year: Where are they now? — “Word of the Year is more than a linguistic parlor game: It’s a snapshot of a year in the culture. And this is the perfect time of year to reflect on how good those snapshots turned out to be. A successful WOTY looks great in hindsight—the beginning of something big, or at least a resonant moment in our shared history. A failed one is more like an embarrassing Christmas photo with perm and reindeer sweater.”

December 16 2013

15:22

DEF

Guest speaker: Terence McKennaListen Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser. Download                      Subscribe      MP3                            FreePCs – Right click, select option Macs – Ctrl-Click, select option PROGRAM NOTES: [NOTE: All quotations are by Terence McKenna.] “I’ve never met anyone with a deeper devotion to cannabis than myself.” “So what you have to do is just like every other thing, everything you’ve been told is wrong, and you have to take life by the handlebars and figure out what’s really going on, which doesn’t mean that you’re reckless.” “We’ve been polluted by Disney.” “We are living inside a 90% Nineteenth Century world view. And a culture cannot evolve any faster than its language evolves, because what cannot be said cannot be done. What cannot be said cannot be put in place.” “So in a way, one way of thinking about psychedelics is that they empower language. It’s a way to force the evolution of language. The way you stretch the envelope of culture is by creating language.” “It was very important, I think, to the Establishment to suppress that [hip phrases from the Hippie culture], because new words are the beginnings of new realities.” “What holds us together is what holds all sub-cultures together, which is an experience. In this case, the experience of being loaded, and, you know, it’s a very powerful and immediate kind of experience.” “It’s amazing that the world has evolved as far and as fast as it has, the human world, glued together by nothing more than small mouth noises.” “The whole history of the evolution of the Western mind is in a sense the birth of the Logos. The Logos is making its way towards self-expression, and it’s doing this by claiming dimension, after dimension of manifestation.” “The mind is not a form of intelligence. The mind is the theater in which intelligence is manifested. You don’t want to confuse the garage with the car. … Everything goes on within the confines of mind. It’s like the light that you switch on when you walk into a darkened room, and then everything else is the furniture within the room. Mind is simply the light which is shed over the landscape of appearances. … Mind is the inclusive category, I think.” “It’s very important to try and make some accommodation to the local language, because in a way, only the local language is appropriate to the place. … Somehow the local language is a part of the local reality.” “The one thing you learn taking psychedelics is that nothing is straightforward.” “Anybody who starts talking to you about the grandeur that was Rome, should be reminded: The grandeur of Rome was it was a bargain-basement on three floors masquerading as a military brothel. It was not a great civilization.” “I’m completely convinced that no one is in control, and that this is very good news.” “In a sense, the flying saucer is nothing more than a modern rebirth of the philosopher’s stone. The flying saucer is the universal panacea at the end of time. It’s the thing which cannot exist, but which does exist, and which if we could obtain it everything would be different.” http://www.matrixmasters.net/salon/?p=267

December 15 2013

14:00

Does Language Bring Us Together Or Pull Us Apart?

Mark Pagel says early humans developed language as a tool to cooperate. But with thousands of different languages, Pagel says language also exists to prevent us from communicating outside our tribal groups.

November 26 2013

04:29

The mysterious roots of a homegrown language | KALW

By Liz Pfeffer and Kristina Loring A few hours north of San Francisco is the town of Boonville, nestled in the quaint Anderson Valley of Mendocino County. Like Silicon Valley, this place is http://kalw.org/post/mysterious-roots-homegrown-language

October 08 2013

17:49

Download Podcast

Tags: language
17:48

Download Podcast

Tags: language
17:48

Download Podcast

Tags: language
17:48

Download Podcast

Tags: language
15:49

Alice Gaby - on linguistics

Talk about the relevance of linguistics and implications for neuroscience

September 19 2013

06:01

A Taste of the Past - Episode 71 - Eat Your Words: A Culinary History of the English Language

What do beat, bean, and leek all have in common with each other? Find out on this week's episode A Taste of The Past where Linda goes into the history of food and culinary etymology with Ina Lipkowitz teacher of English literature and Biblical Studies at MIT and author of Words to Eat By. Discover the semantic shift in the word meat, the influence of the ancient Romans on plant breeds, and how much religious symbolism is based off food. Listen and become aware about how much food words have an impact on us. This episode is sponsored by The Hearst Ranch. http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/1752-A-Taste-of-the-Past-Episode-71-Eat-Your-Words-A-Culinary-History-of-the-English-Language

August 10 2013

19:15

July 28 2013

23:03

Spark • Internet Linguistics:€” Q&A with David Crystal

David Crystal is a world-renowned linguist. He’s the author of over 100 books, and an advocate of what he calls “Internet Linguistics" — an approach to understanding how we use language online. Nora Young interviewed David for Spark 220. This Q&A is a lightly edited version of that interview. http://sparkcbc.tumblr.com/post/52398439754/internet-linguistics-q-a-with-david-crystal
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