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February 22 2014

23:43

February 17 2014

15:00

February 13 2014

16:29

Wem gehört das Internet? | NDR.de - NDR Info - Programm - Sendungen - Das Forum

Aus anfänglichem Optimismus im Internet ist inzwischen tiefes Misstrauen geworden. Es geht um Macht, Vorherrschaft und Einschüchterung. Die Informationen im Netz sind umkämpft. http://www.ndr.de/info/programm/sendungen/forum/internet1141.html

January 31 2014

05:39

Mei Ling Starkey of The Rock Church: Episode 72 » Social Media Church podcast

Podcast: Download (Duration: 27:40 — 12.7MB) Mei Ling Starkey is the Media Relations/Social Media Director at The Rock Church in San Diego, California, founded & led by Pastor Miles McPherson. She connected with us on the Social Media Church podcast while en route between one thing and another; we talk about Rock Church’s approach to communicating through social media, how to integrate volunteers into the flow of their church’s social media, engaging people on their online campus, a newly-launched video devotional app, and more. Show Notes Connect with Mei Ling Starkey on Twitter @mlstarkey The Rock Church is on Twitter @therocksandiego, Facebook fb.com/therocksandiego, Instagram instagram.com/therocksandiego, YouTube youtube.com/therocksandiego Rock Live – Watch The Rock Church services live online Miles A Minute – The 60 Second Daily Video Devotional app – Every day for a year with Miles McPherson #new Real-time dashboard of the most popular church Facebook pages @djchuang something that I did that you did not mention on the podcast (and Josh on his blog) was set-lists. https://t.co/oQJbIgq3Xm — Brian Alexander (@brianfalexander) January 21, 2014 Brian Alexander on @brianfalexander + on Instagram http://instagram.com/brianalexand3r + he’s at Forest Hill Church (Charlotte NC) Share this:FacebookTwitterGoogleTumblrPinterestEmail http://socialmediachurch.net/2014/01/mei-ling-starkey-of-the-rock-church-episode-72/

January 24 2014

03:46

Is Net Neutrality Dead? | On Point with Tom Ashbrook

Net neutrality and a fork in the road for the Internet. We’ll look at what the Internet is really going to be. Netflix’s Chief Content Officer  Ted Sarandos seen at the Netflix Signature Gala at 2013 TIFF, on Sunday, Sep, 8, 2013 in Toronto. Netflix is one of many companies that could be affected by a court-ordered change in the F.C.C.’s ‘net neutrality’ policy, where Internet Service Providers can charge different rates for different quantities of available data downloads. The streaming movie and TV provider requires access to massive amounts of data streaming to play video. (AP) One week ago today came a court ruling in Washington that could change almost everything about the Internet. At least, everything important to a lot of people. A Federal appeals court struck down the F.C.C.’s requirement of “net neutrality.” Internet service providers — big phone and cable companies — had been required to treat everything equal on the web. Now they’re not. They can package and tier and privilege and block and charge for web content like cable TV charges for HBO. That is still sinking in. This hour On Point: what the Internet is going to be, and the fate of net neutrality. – Tom Ashbrook Guests Brian Fung, technology policy reporter for The Washington Post. (@b_fung) John Bergmayer, senior staff attorney at Public Knowledge, a not-for-profit public interest group. (@bergmayer) Randolph May, President of the Free State Foundation. (@fsfthinktank) Jennifer Rexford, professor of computer science at Princeton University. Serves on the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Advisory Committee. (@jrexnet) From Tom’s Reading List Washington Post: 11 questions you were too afraid to ask about net neutrality — “Running a network is expensive. Some believe that if you use more data, you should pay for it — in the same way that your utility company charges you for using more water or more electricity. And companies that operate the networks are always looking for new ways to bring in revenue so that they can make more upgrades — or, if you’re a cynic, so that they can line their pockets.” Los Angeles Times:  ’Net neutrality’ ruling could be costly for consumers, advocates say –”The agency will consider appealing the decision or taking other options, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said, ‘to ensure that these networks on which the Internet depends continue to provide a free and open platform for innovation and expression and operate in the interest of all Americans.’ In the short term, the ruling left big telecom companies, small businesses, government agencies and consumers scrambling to understand its effect and making their cases about how they believe the FCC should proceed.” The Atlantic: No, Netflix Is Not Doomed By the Net Neutrality Decision — “There is an even easier solution for net-neutrality fans. The FCC could decide it has the political cover and popular support to declare broadband providers utilities, like landline phones or roads. This would make Internet providers subject to so-called ‘common carrier’ rules, which would keep them from discriminating against certain services, such as Netflix.” close http://onpoint.wbur.org/2014/01/21/net-neutrality-fcc-netflix-streaming

January 23 2014

12:53

The Great Book of Knowledge, Part 2 | Ideas with Paul Kennedy | CBC Radio

We used to need libraries to make the sum of human knowledge available to all. Today we have Wikipedia, where the sum of human knowledge can be shaped by all of us. But can we trust it? Philip Coulter suggests that the collective mind is perhaps the best mind http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/2014/01/22/the-great-book-of-knowledge-part-2-1/

January 21 2014

09:50

Is Net Neutrality Dead?

Net neutrality and a fork in the road for the Internet. We’ll look at what the Internet is really going to be.

Netflix's Ted Sarandos seen at the Netflix Signature Gala at 2013 TIFF, on Sunday, Sep, 8, 2013 in Toronto. Netflix is one of many companies that could be affected by a court-ordered change in the F.C.C.'s 'net neutrality' policy, where Internet Service Providers can charge different rates for different quantities of available data downloads. The streaming movie and TV provider requires access to massive amounts of data streaming to play video. (AP)

Netflix’s Chief Content Officer  Ted Sarandos seen at the Netflix Signature Gala at 2013 TIFF, on Sunday, Sep, 8, 2013 in Toronto. Netflix is one of many companies that could be affected by a court-ordered change in the F.C.C.’s ‘net neutrality’ policy, where Internet Service Providers can charge different rates for different quantities of available data downloads. The streaming movie and TV provider requires access to massive amounts of data streaming to play video. (AP)

Guests

Brian Fung, technology policy reporter for The Washington Post. (@b_fung)

John Bergmayer, senior staff attorney at Public Knowledge, a not-for-profit public interest group. (@bergmayer)

Randolph May, President of the Free State Foundation. (@fsfthinktank)

Jennifer Rexford, professor of computer science at Princeton University. Serves on the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Advisory Committee. (@jrexnet)

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: 11 questions you were too afraid to ask about net neutrality — “Running a network is expensive. Some believe that if you use more data, you should pay for it — in the same way that your utility company charges you for using more water or more electricity. And companies that operate the networks are always looking for new ways to bring in revenue so that they can make more upgrades — or, if you’re a cynic, so that they can line their pockets.”

Los Angeles Times:  ’Net neutrality’ ruling could be costly for consumers, advocates say –”The agency will consider appealing the decision or taking other options, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said, ‘to ensure that these networks on which the Internet depends continue to provide a free and open platform for innovation and expression and operate in the interest of all Americans.’ In the short term, the ruling left big telecom companies, small businesses, government agencies and consumers scrambling to understand its effect and making their cases about how they believe the FCC should proceed.”

The Atlantic: No, Netflix Is Not Doomed By the Net Neutrality Decision — “There is an even easier solution for net-neutrality fans. The FCC could decide it has the political cover and popular support to declare broadband providers utilities, like landline phones or roads. This would make Internet providers subject to so-called ‘common carrier’ rules, which would keep them from discriminating against certain services, such as Netflix.”

January 16 2014

09:36

David Weinberger on knowledge

David Weinberger, senior researcher at Harvard Law’s Berkman Center for the Internet & Society and Co-Director of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab at Harvard Law School, discusses his new book entitled, “Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room.” According to Weinberger, knowledge in the Western world is taking on properties of its new medium, the Internet. He discusses how he believes the transformation from paper medium to Internet medium changes the shape of knowledge. Weinberger goes on to discuss how gathering knowledge is different and more effective, using hyperlinks as an example of a speedy way to obtain more information on a topic. Weinberger then talks about how the web serves as the “room,” where knowledge seekers are plugged into a network of experts who disagree and critique one another. He also addresses how he believes the web has a way of filtering itself, steering one toward information that is valuable. http://surprisinglyfree.com/2012/02/21/david-weinberger/

January 15 2014

05:11

Women And Internet Harassment

Internet aggression toward women. What’s it about? How do we fix it? Plus, a media firestorm around tweeting through cancer.

A woman uses a personal computer. (Ray Smith / Flickr / Creative Commons)

A woman uses a personal computer. (Ray Smith / Flickr / Creative Commons)

Guests

Amanda Hess, freelance writer. Author of “Why Women Aren’t Welcome On the Internet.” (@AmandaHess)

Anna Holmes,  founding editor of Jezebel.com, the online women’s news and culture magazine. Author of “The Book of Jezebel: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Lady Things” and “Hell Hath No Fury: Women’s Letters From The End of the Affair.” Columnist at the New York Times Book Review. (AnnaHolmes">@AnnaHolmes)

Danielle Citron, professor of law the University of Maryland, Balitmore. Author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.” (@DANIELLECITRON)

From Tom’s Reading List

Pacific Standard: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet — “A woman doesn’t even need to occupy a professional writing perch at a prominent platform to become a target. According to a 2005 report by the Pew Research Center, which has been tracking the online lives of Americans for more than a decade, women and men have been logging on in equal numbers since 2000, but the vilest communications are still disproportionately lobbed at women. We are more likely to report being stalked and harassed on the Internet—of the 3,787 people who reported harassing incidents from 2000 to 2012 to the volunteer organization Working to Halt Online Abuse, 72.5 percent were female. ”

New York Times: The War on Women — “I don’t think either the left or the right quite understands this worldview: feminists tend to see it simply as a species of reaction, social conservatives as the dark fruit of sexual liberation, when it’s really a combination of the two. And because it channels some legitimate male anxieties alongside its chauvinism and resentment, it probably can’t be shamed or driven underground — or not, at least, without making its side effects for women that much more toxic.”

The Wire: Welcome to the Twisted Age of the Twitter Death Threat — “Enter the age of the online death threat. It’s scary, yeah, because it’s a death threat. Humans rarely like being threatened with an end to their basic essence, no matter the delivery method for that announcement. And yet, on Twitter, this becomes such a weird, surreal concept: It’s deeply impersonal (these people don’t even know each other and probably never will; NONE of them know each other, likely), fueled by a false kind of rage spawned by the way the Internet works (one side gets self-righteously mad, another side self-righteously madder, and repeat). Fortunately, in most cases, the threat is also incredibly unlikely to be fulfilled. ”

The Media-Firestorm Around Tweeting Through Cancer

Lisa Belkin, senior correspondent for The Huffington Post. Author of “Life’s Work: Confessions of an Unbalanced Mom,” Show Me A Hero,” and “First, Do No Harm.”  (@LisaBelkin)

The Huffington Post: Lisa Bonchek Adams And The Problem With Criticizing A Woman Who Documents Her Cancer Treatment Online  – “True we need a national conversation about ‘how much is too much.’ But the reason the lines are blurred in the first place — i.e. the very reason we need that conversation — is because what is one patient’s torture is another’s reassurance that they have done everything they could. Emma’s father was 79 when he died two years ago, with multiple health problems. Lisa Adams was 37 when she was diagnosed seven years ago, with three young children. Yes, her years of treatment have been agonizing at times, and I would not presume to tell any patient that they must choose that painful, possibly fruitless, path. I also would never dream of telling them that they shouldn’t. What Bill sees as extra years of ‘frantic medical trench warfare,’ Adams sees more simply as extra years.”

January 07 2014

23:23

Y U NO ISP, taking back the Net

Building and running an ISP is not that difficult. It's hard to say how many people are connected to the Internet by such weird structures, but we know that they are more and more each day. What is at stake is taking back the control of the Internet infrastructure and showing that a neutral Internet access is natural. Y U NO ISP Providing access to the Internet seems complicated but it's actually quite simple. You have to roll up your sleeves, dig a lot into legal, commercial and administrative stuff. Surprisingly, the technical part is usually not a problem. Despite what you could think, there is no need for a big infrastructure, a lot of money, or that sort of thing. Benjamin Bayart is at the head of the non-profit organization FDN the oldest ISP still in activity in France. In 2010, he called for the swarming of the concepts behind FDN. The idea was to copy locally what FDN was doing at a country scale and spread the word about self-hosting, Net neutrality and the stakes for society. The call was followed by the creation of several non-profit organizations, quickly federated in a meta-structure called FFDN, for Federation FDN. 2 years later, FFDN is much bigger. From 7 orgs, there are now 21, counting around 1 400 members. A human network above the machine's one. From the beginning, we knew that we were not alone and in the meantime we met with similar organizations around the world, like the Free Network Fundation in the USA or Guifi in Spain. We launched an international mailing list to spread the recipes for building open and neutral access to the Internet in many situations. During OHM, this talk helped federating energies around a belgium project and we hope 30C3 will be the occasion to spread the word even more, maybe to give some ideas and plant some seeds for building a better Internet. After all, Y U NO TRY ? http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5391.html Day: 2013-12-29 Start time: 11:30 Duration: 00:30 Room: Saal 6 Track: Hardware & Making Language: en
23:00

The Four Wars

Based on her own experiences as an Intelligence Officer for MI5 (the UK domestic security service) and a whistleblower, Annie Machon will talk about the relationships between the wars on 'terror', drugs, whistleblowers, and the internet, and suggest some ideas about what we can do. Drawing on her experiences as an MI5 intelligence officer-turned-whistleblower who had to go on the run around Europe, as well as her current work as a writer, commentator, and a Director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, Annie will be discussing the four current global wars: on terror, drugs, whistleblowers and the internet, and suggesting ways that we, as concerned citizens, can resist. After World War 2 the peoples of the world, collectively reeling from the violence and barbarity, drew up the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This is a high water mark in civilisation. Since then, at least in the west, we have enjoyed an unprecedented degree of freedom and prosperity. In the subsequent decades further victories were won around equal rights on issues of race, gender, or sexuality. By the 1990s peace appeared to be breaking out around the world, the Cold War was over, and we all lived in an increasingly connected, globalised village. Or did we.... President Eisenhower coined the phrase "the military-industrial complex". He recognised that conflict was good for business, and this had implications for future security. He was prescient. After the racial war was won in the USA, they announced the "war on drugs" which has disproportionately hit ethnic communities in America; as the Soviet threat receded, so the Islamist threat came to prominence; and as the free flow of information spread over the internet, so the fight-back began with the copyright wars, surveillance, and the crackdown on whistleblowers and organisations such as Wikileaks. We are now facing the "military-security complex" and an unending, if nebulous, war on concepts. What can we do about it? http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5295.html Day: 2013-12-29 Start time: 20:30 Duration: 00:30 Room: Saal 1 Track: Ethics, Society & Politics Language: en

January 06 2014

18:33

The Internet's Cicada: A Mystery Without An Answer : NPR

Two years ago, strange sets of bewildering puzzles appeared on the Internet, with a message encouraging "highly intelligent individuals" to try to break the code. The code led to more clues spanning a global Internet mystery, that has yet to be solved. http://www.npr.org/2014/01/05/259959632/the-internets-cicada-a-mystery-without-an-answer

January 03 2014

21:20

Snapchat and the Future of an Erasable Internet

Apps like Snapchat, Whisper and Telegram let you send photos and messages that erase themselves after they’re opened. Are they models for the future of the http://www.kcrw.com/news/programs/tp/tp140103snapchat_and_the_fut

December 10 2013

17:17

Untangling the Web: 700 "Friends" on Facebook

How has the most revolutionary innovation of our time - the Internet - transformed our world? What does it mean for the modern family? How has it changed our concepts of privacy? Of celebrity? Of love, sex and hate? In this excerpt from Untangling the Web: What the Internet is Doing to You, author Dr Aleks Krotoski presents the evidence about how the computer has transformed our social world - who we know and how they influence us. "Aleks Krotoski is a rare combination of academic (she has a PhD in psychology), geek, reporter and fluent essayist." - The Guardian "Her combination of cautious academic rigour and geek-like enthusiasm makes a very valuable contribution to the debate" - Financial Times More on this topic at untanglingtheweb.tumblr.com, the reporter's notebook for the Guardian and Observer column and the book. http://soundcloud.com/aktkltd/untangling-the-web-700-friends
17:17

Untangling the Web: A Nation of Narcissists

How has the most revolutionary innovation of our time - the Internet - transformed our world? What does it mean for the modern family? How has it changed our concepts of privacy? Of celebrity? Of love, sex and hate? In this excerpt from Untangling the Web: What the Internet is Doing to You, author Dr Aleks Krotoski presents the evidence about how the computer has transformed our selves - who we are and who we want to be. "Aleks Krotoski is a rare combination of academic (she has a PhD in psychology), geek, reporter and fluent essayist." - The Guardian "Her combination of cautious academic rigour and geek-like enthusiasm makes a very valuable contribution to the debate" - Financial Times More on this topic at untanglingtheweb.tumblr.com, the reporter's notebook for the Guardian and Observer column and the book. http://soundcloud.com/aktkltd/untangling-the-web-a-nation-of

December 08 2013

09:23

NachGespräch - Manuel Grabowski

Auf jedes NachGespräch folgt ein zweites: Manches fällt einem erst ein, wenn man sich bereits längere Zeit mit jemandem unterhalten hat, anderes ergibt sich daraus wieder. Genau deswegen spreche ich zweimal mit jedem Gast. Hier nun also das zweite NachGespräch mit Manuel Grabowski.

December 04 2013

16:20

The coming war on general purpose computing - Future Tense - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Sci-fi author and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow talks about a coming 'war on general purpose computing', which could have far reaching consequences for our society. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-coming-war-on-general-purpose-computing-v2/5117100

November 20 2013

11:39

Digital Currency, Bitcoin And The Dark Web

Bitcoin and virtual currencies in the spotlight on Capitol Hill. We’ll look at the new world of digital money and the issues that come with it.

Guests

Andy Greenberg technology, privacy, and information security reporter at Forbes Magazine. Author of “This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World’s Information.” (@A_Greenberg)

Robin Sidel, senior special writer at The Wall Street Journal.

Susan Athey, professor of economics at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economics Policy Research.

Sen. Tom Carper, U.S. Senator. (D-Delware). (@SenatorCarper)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: U.S. Officials Set to Address Bitcoin at Senate Hearing — “Officials from the U.S. Secret Service, which investigates counterfeit currencies, and the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network made similar remarks, detailing successful criminal investigations into virtual currencies and the need to ensure that companies that deal in bitcoin comply with money-laundering rules where appropriate. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, who isn’t testifying Monday, said in a letter to the Senate committee that while virtual currencies ‘may pose risks related to law enforcement and supervisory matters, there are also areas in which they may hold long-term promise, particularly if the innovations promote a faster, more secure, and more efficient payment system.’”

Forbes: Meet The ‘Assassination Market’ Creator Who’s Crowdfunding Murder With Bitcoins –”Like other so-called ‘dark web’ sites, Assassination Market runs on the anonymity network Tor, which is designed to prevent anyone from identifying the site’s users or Sanjuro himself. Sanjuro’s decision to accept only Bitcoins is also intended to protect users, Sanjuro, and any potential assassins from being identified through their financial transactions. Bitcoins, after all, can be sent and received without necessarily tying them to any real-world identity. In the site’s instructions to users, Sanjuro suggests they run their funds through a “laundry” service to make sure the coins are anonymized before contributing them to anyone’s murder fund.”

The New Yorker: Dark Wallet: A Radical Way To Bitcoin — “Wilson and Taaki’s project, tentatively known as Dark Wallet, is a simple wallet designed to be easier to use for people who aren’t tech-savvy; they hope that in turn accelerates the currency’s rate of adoption around the world. The wallet will be open-source and free to use. Eventually, Wilson and Taaki hope to create a vast stable of Bitcoin-related tools. The goal, for Wilson, is similar to what he tried to do with the Liberator: use technology to remove government intervention from his life, and from the lives of like-minded people.”

October 29 2013

08:03

Untangling the web with Dr Aleks Krotoski - Download This Show - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Social psychologist Aleks Krotoski has spent a decade untangling the effects of the web on our lives. She broadcasts and writes on our increasingly co-dependent relationship with the online world. She talks with ABC Radio National's Marc Fennell live at the Sydney Writers' Festival 2013 http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/downloadthisshow/dts262013/4802764

October 27 2013

17:45

Daniel Suarez: DARKNET - 3D

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