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January 16 2014

20:25

Brad Frost – Creating Responsive Interfaces » UIE Brain Sparks

Brad: Yeah. I think that, yeah, more or less, that’s it. Molecules are a couple tags stitched together. You might have just a search form that’s comprised of search label, an input, and a button, and that is a self-contained little assembly of stuff that does something. Atoms by themselves, the tags are all really abstract and floating around in space. You don’t really see, inherently, just from looking at that level, how these things might be useful. It’s like, “Well, that’s nice.” It’s helpful at an at-a-glance sort of level. Then you start combining them into these little packages, these little molecules, and now they could actually start doing something. You might have your primary navigation as a molecule, your search form as a molecule, and stuff like that, and then you put those molecules together into a header organism. Now your header organism contains your logo atom and contains your navigation molecule, it contains your search-form molecule, and all those things operate at this standalone, reusable component. From there, then you start stitching these organisms together and finally start building these sort of page-level things, like templates and then, ultimately, pages, which we don’t have to get into. The idea is that you have these little clusters of elements, and then you combine those together into more complex clusters of stuff. The whole idea is to basically establish this really sound, really deliberate interface, where everything is being built up with the intention of creating a system that’s built for reuse, built for scalability. Certainly helps with responsive design because, again, you’re able to treat these problems at the component level rather than at a page level. Also, just from being future-friendly — you’re establishing these nice rules and guidelines and constraints, and this goes inside of this, which means that the new hire you hire four months down the line can understand how things are put together and why things are put together in the way that they are. I think that in my experience using this and helping create this, what we’re doing now, why we’re doing this, is that it’s no longer feasible to just throw over a handful of page templates to a client and just say, “Here’s your site. Have a nice day. Make sure I get my final paycheck.” It’s not enough to do that anymore. We have to be a lot more deliberate with this. We have to give them better tools, better resources, so that we don’t come back next year and, all of a sudden, they’ve changed the color of green and they’ve put this thing next to this thing and they’ve created a bunch of new code all on their own, in different patterns and stuff, and it all looks like a big, giant, Frankenstein mess. In part, that’s your fault if that happens, simply because you didn’t give them the library of components, you didn’t give them the building blocks, the LEGO bricks, so that if they need to add a new section to the site. If they need to add another widget, or an organism or component or whatever you want to call it, they have a language to choose from and make informed decisions. I think that that’s really, really cool. In fact, one of the clients that we first did this on — actually, the very first client that I introduced this whole atomic-design, Pattern Lab concept — was TechCrunch. I was actually just on their site last night and noticed that they had added a different component to the site. You read the article, and then there was an extra little “You might also like” sort of thing. Now, we had our own version of that, and that’s still there, but then they added a separate “You might also like these stories.” What I found is that they used the interface patterns that we provided them to construct an entirely new module. http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/16/brad-frost-creating-responsive-interfaces/
18:44

098: With Lyza Danger Gardner - ShopTalk

This week we were joined by Lyza Danger Gardner. We talked about (roughly in order): News’n’Links’n’Drama: 12:33 Web Standards Killed The HTML Star, and Is Web Design Dead? 21:40 Grunt is dead? What about Gulp? Q & A: 27:04 I’m curious to know how we as a community are handling touch events on mobile devices at the moment? Specifically referring to dropdown/fly-out menus. Is there a popular jQuery/JS library you’d recommend? 35:15 Every now and then, my job requires me to code an html email template. I usually have to look online to see what email clients can and can’t handle, but lately I’ve been getting a lot of contradictory answers. Is there a CanIUse.com for emails? 40:05 Is it possible to (and how can one) avoid code redundancy / DRY violations when supporting non-media query browsers like IE8 and below during responsive design implementation? 50:37 Can you explain a bit about what Compass is, how to use it, and what makes it so great? 58:34 What are the benefits of having a responsive design vs a separate mobile site? http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/098-lyza-danger-gardner/

January 08 2014

16:15

Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind » UIE Brain Sparks

Jason: There is a lot of that, that can be done, and there are businesses that are amazing at that. Etsy does, in their annual reports, they now have a performance section, because performance is such a big part of what they do and such a competitive advantage that they’re reporting out on these things. And trying to make improvements in performance all the time. I think that there are a bunch of businesses that are really, really smart about this stuff and are looking at it across the whole spectrum of what needs to be done. One of the things that I find the most interesting is that, inside the performance community, people have gotten down to the point where they’re talking about different types of specific JavaScript instructions and which ones are faster and not as fast and things of that nature. That’s awesome. I’m glad that they’re doing that. That is not the stuff that I spend my time worrying about or talking to people about, because what I find over and over again is it’s the simple things that aren’t getting done. What I’m looking at in responsive design is really about, “OK, well, what is the approach that you need to do to make responsive design performant? What are the five things that you really need to keep in mind? Where do you get the most bang for your buck?” Generally, I think, even if we weren’t talking about responsive design, maybe if we were just talking about Web design in general. There’s just a handful of things. This isn’t something that’s responsive-design-specific. It’s not something that we end up talking about in the workshop or anything, because it’s not responsive-design-specific. There’s this simple instruction for a server to turn on Gzip, which is a form of compression, and it is in Apache, which is the most popular Web server. It’s three lines of configuration. It’s not even code. It’s just three lines saying, “Turn this thing on.” It’ll take text files and reduce the size of them 80 percent. It’s brain-dead simple, right, but I’ll bump into sites all the time that don’t have that on, and then designers that don’t know that that’s a thing. They don’t even know how to check to see whether their back-end developers have done it. The designer doesn’t have to know those three lines, right? All they have to know is, “Hey, this is something that I should look for,” and there are tools to check to see whether your page is doing this. They need to know that it is really, really simple, so that they can’t get somebody telling them that it’s more difficult than it is. Just say, “Look, this needs to be turned on. It would make such a big difference for our users, and it would save us money because we don’t have to pay as much for bandwidth.” All this sort of stuff. The things that I focus on are really at that level. They’re either things that designers should know, particularly when it comes to responsive design, how do you handle images, how do you do mobile-first responsive design, why is this important. They’re not designed to be like, “OK, let’s go calculate things and let’s go figure out the nitty-gritty of performance.” There’s something really satisfying about performance, because it’s the one bit of design that you do that you can actually measure results on, so it can get a little addictive. It’s like it’s got its own built-in gamification to it. If people were to start thinking about it from a responsive-design perspective and then get excited about it and go do other things, that would be awesome. That’s not what I focus on. I’m just like, “OK, you guys are going to do responsive design. Here’s how to do it well. Here’s, big-picture, what you have to keep in mind. Here are the challenges you’re going to bump into. Here’s how you do it in a way that works well and is per-formant, and here’s why you should care about performance. Here’s why it’s actually something that, as a designer is actually, impacts your job and you have the power to change it.” Sorry. That was a little rant. I just think that people get turned off of performance, for some reason that I don’t quite understand, when you don’t have to get into the nitty-gritty to just understand some big stuff that will make huge impacts. http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/07/jason-grigsby-responsive-web-design-with-mobile-in-mind/

December 09 2013

00:46

Hampton Catlin | the Ruby on Rails Podcast

The author of HAML rants on markup, Macs, diversity, and tech writing. Transcript: http://podcast.rubyonrails.org/programs/1/episodes/hampton_catlin

September 17 2013

00:15

5by5 | The Web Ahead #56: The Nature of the Web with Jeremy Keith

Wonder-developer Jeremy Keith joins Jen Simmons to talk about comments on websites, the birth of the web, progressive enhancement, control and much more. http://5by5.tv/webahead/56

August 09 2012

10:22

028: With Allison House - ShopTalk

Tags: css web html

August 26 2011

21:45

Emily Lewis Builds the Web One Microformat at a Time

Carl and Richard talk to Emily Lewis about HTML5, CSS3, Microformats, and general web development topics. Emily calls herself a 'standardista' and demonstrates that in the conversation, talking about the advantage of using schemas to identify different types of data in your web pages. Could this be the return of XML schemas in a way that makes sense? http://dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?showNum=692

July 20 2011

09:03

Helping users find content and take action « Boagworld

July 08 2011

09:13

June 17 2011

07:32

213. Getting all emotional « Boagworld

A podcast for those who design, develop and run websites. http://boagworld.com/podcast/213/

June 16 2011

21:00

You, Me and the WWDC

June 12 2011

06:36

TummelVision 67: Tantek Çelik explains open web standards for poets | Tummelvision

June 08 2011

15:31

Laying the ground work « Boagworld

Before you can create an effective website you need to know what you are trying to achieve, how you are going to measure success and what you want from users

May 31 2011

01:58

Web Weekly- Episode 39

http://webweekly.tv/2011/faq/ In this weeks episode Kevin and Jonas talk about FAQ with new recording software.

May 22 2011

00:46

Home Work

http://webweekly.tv/2011/home-work/ Freelancing? Working our of the house? Or in an office? In this weeks episode, Candi Ligutan, Emily Lewis, and Jonas Flint talk about these items leaving Kevin Dees to his WordCamp Raleigh shenanigans.

May 10 2011

16:47

Jared Spool talks about calls to action « Boagworld

A podcast for those who design, develop and run websites. http://boagworld.com/usability/jared-spool-talks-about-calls-to-action/

April 29 2011

03:40

The Big Web Show #1: Web Fonts - 5by5

The Big Web Show #1: Web Fonts - 5by5 http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/1

April 27 2011

13:28

Web Weekly

In this weeks episode Kevin and Jonas Talk about this weeks news and links and test out the new equipment.

March 26 2011

20:16

Web Weekly - Episode 31

http://webweekly.tv/2011/micro-fomats/ In this weeks show Kevin and Jonas are joined by Emily Lewis to talk about Micro Formats.

March 21 2011

19:19

No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can't Code

Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It's very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He's talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material--the material informs the form.... Because when an object's materials, the materials' processes and the form are all perfectly aligned.... People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it's possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve? * Jenn Lukas * Ethan Marcotte * Ryan Sims * Wilson Miner
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