Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

November 25 2013

14:24

Little Atoms 294 – Mark Miodownik & Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories of the Marvellous Materials that Shape Our Man-made World

Mark Miodownik is Professor of Materials and Society at UCL, and the Director of the UCL Institute of Making. He recently appeared in The Times’ inaugural list of the 100 most influential scientists in the UK. He is currently scientist-in-residence on Dara O Briain’s Science Club (BBC2) and has presented of several documentaries, including The Genius of Invention (BBC2), and in 2010 he gave the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. Mark’s first book is Stuff Matters: The Strange Stories of the Marvellous Materials that Shape Our Man-made World.

July 30 2012

00:05

BBC: Discovery

Future Flight (1 of 2) -- Gareth Mitchell meets the engineers who will transform the way we fly around the world. He finds out how aircraft may take on new shapes in the future.

December 30 2011

19:21

July 19 2011

12:45

Singularity University Lectures: Astro Teller on Innovation

Dr. Astro Teller is currently Director of New Projects for Google, working to help the company explore new potential business areas. Astro is also co-founder and a current Director of Cerebellum Capital, Inc, a hedge fund management firm whose investments are continuously designed, executed, and improved by a software system based on techniques from statistical machine learning. Astro is also co-founder and a current Director of BodyMedia, Inc, a leading wearable body monitoring company. From 2007 to 2010, Astro was the founding CEO of Cerebellum Capital. From 1999 to 2007, Dr. Teller was the founding CEO of BodyMedia, Inc. From 2003 to 2010, Astro was a co-founder and Chairman of Zivio Technologies, an intellectual property holding company. Prior to starting BodyMedia, Dr. Teller was co-founder, Chairman, and CEO of Sandbox Advanced Development, an advanced development technology company. Before his tenure as a business executive, Dr. Teller taught at Stanford University and was an engineer and researcher for Phoenix Laser Technologies, Stanford’s Center for Integrated Systems, and The Carnegie Group Incorporated. Dr. Teller holds a Bachelor of Science in computer science from Stanford University, Masters of Science in symbolic and heuristic computation, also from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in artificial intelligence from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was a recipient of the prestigious Hertz fellowship. As a respected scientist and seasoned entrepreneur, Teller has successfully created and grown five companies and holds numerous U.S. patents related to his work in hardware and software technology. Dr. Teller’s work in science, literature, art, and business has appeared in international media from the New York Times to CNN to NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Teller regularly gives invited talks for national and international technology, government, and business forums on the subject of the future of intelligent technology.

July 06 2011

14:36

Software Engineering Radio - Ep 159 with Scott Meyers on C++0x

This episode is a conversation with Scott Meyers about the upcoming C++0x standard. We talk a bit about the reasons for creating this new standard and then cover the most important new features, including upport for concurrency, implicitly-typed variables, move semantics, variadic templates, lambda functions, and uniform initialization syntax. We also looked at some new features in the standard library.

April 17 2011

02:51

Ockham's Razor - 17 April 2011 - The Titanic disaster and global warming

Arthur Marcel lectures at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane and in today's talk he compares the circumstances surrounding the sinking of the Titanic to issues surrounding global warming. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/ockhamsrazor/stories/2011/3191637.htm

January 21 2011

18:01

Future Tense: The Space Elevator

The idea of the space elevator has been around for over a century. But in recent years teams of scientists and engineers have been actively working on the concept. So could the elevator become a reality? Or is it still a case of science-fiction? http://www.abc.net.au/rn/futuretense/stories/2010/2977165.htm
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl