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February 17 2014

22:02

February 14 2014

20:48

February 11 2014

19:45

A Personal Learning Framework

"In this talk I review two major threads of our work at NRC over the last few years, MOOCs and Personal Learning Environments (PLEs). I describe the gRSShopper project and our Plearn PLE prototype development. Placing these in the context of a network theory of learning, I then outline the new Learning and Performance Support System (LPSS) program being undertaken at NRC."

February 05 2014

05:31

Community Colleges On America’s Front Line

American community colleges say they’re on the front line of holding together an unravelling society. We’ll get the message.

Students at the Bunker Hill Community College

Students at the Bunker Hill Community College “LifeMap Lab” on the Boston-area college’s campus. (Courtesy Bunker Hill Community College)

Guests

Pam Eddinger, president of Bunker Hill Community College. (@PamEddinger)

Bruce Leslie, chancellor of Alamo Colleges. (@AlamoColleges1)

Paul Brown, president of the Zane State College in Zansesville, Ohio.

From Tom’s Reading List

Times Higher Education Supplement: US rural community colleges hit by economic upturn — “US rural community colleges face a battle to survive in the face of declining state funding and falling enrollment, an expert has warned.J. Noah Brown, president and chief executive officer of the Association of Community College Trustees, told Times Higher Education in a podcast interview that the ‘huge increase’  in community college enrolment during the recession had ceased, leaving many institutions at risk of closure.”

Washington Monthly: America’s Best Community Colleges 2013 — “Today, community colleges remain a pillar of the American system of higher learning, with more than a million new freshmen—42 percent of the total—starting their college careers in a two-year institution every year. Politicians love to praise their salt-of-the-earth qualities, including President Barack Obama, who began his administration with bold promises to invest in the two-year sector.”

The Hechinger Report: New figures suggest community college grad rates higher than thought — “Of the estimated one in four students who start at community colleges and then move on to four-year institutions, more than 60 percent ultimately graduate, the National Student Clearinghouse reports. And another 8 percent who haven’t finished haven’t dropped out, the study says; they’re still enrolled. The revelation suggests that the proportion of community college students who successfully complete their educations is higher than the dismal 18 percent the U.S. Department of Education calculates finish their two-year degrees within three years.”

January 13 2014

06:31

The Languages We’re Learning Now

No jobs at home? Looking abroad? We’ll look at the languages Americans are studying today. What’s hot, what’s not and where they lead.

In this Feb. 15, 2013 photograph, Myrtle Hall IV Elementary School teacher Gabrielle Wooden, left, and Camilyn Anderson, 7, lead their first grade class in a live action Spanish class in Clarksdale, Miss. Students attend a language immersion magnet school where Spanish is taught. (AP)

In this Feb. 15, 2013 photograph, Myrtle Hall IV Elementary School teacher Gabrielle Wooden, left, and Camilyn Anderson, 7, lead their first grade class in a live action Spanish class in Clarksdale, Miss. Students attend a language immersion magnet school where Spanish is taught. (AP)

Guests

Marty Abbot, executive director of the American Council on The Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Michael Geisler, vice president for language schools, schools abroad and graduate schools at Middlebury College. Professor in lingustics and languages and professor of German.

John Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, an international job placement consulting firm. (@ChallengerGray)

Nicole Wilson, vice president of language learning products at Rosetta Stone.

From Tom’s Reading List

Forbes: America’s Foreign Language Deficit –More and more students and their parents understand the need to communicate with friends and foes in other countries, and not just on our terms.  Demand for and enrollment in foreign language courses is at its highest level since 1968.  At public K-12 schools, course enrollment in 2007-2008 reached 8.9 million individuals, about 18.5 percent of all students; between 1995 and 2009, it increased 47.8 percent at colleges and universities.

Chronicle of Higher Education: In New Partnership, James Madison U. Offers Credit for Online Rosetta Stone Course — “With less fanfare, a similar deal was recently signed between James Madison University and the language-learning company Rosetta Stone. The public university in Virginia will grant credit to online-only students who complete a 16-week introductory conversational Spanish course produced and largely managed by Rosetta Stone, which sells one of the world’s most popular language-learning programs.”

Business Insider: The 10 Easiest Foreign Languages For English Speakers To Learn –”Frisian is native to Friesland in the Netherlands, and is spoken by fewer than half a million people. Still, it is English’s closest sibling, uniquely connected in the tiny linguistic category of North Sea Germanic languages.”

January 10 2014

07:11

Millennial Generation Searches For Meaning

The vision of a new generation. What millennials want from work, politics, life.

In this Teach for America Delta Institute released photograph taken July 5, 2013, TFA Curriculum Specialist Miles McCauley and University of Mississippi graduate, center, discusses techniques for making key points clear and engaging with corps members, Marcae Thompson, left, and Katherine Brown, both University of Alabama graduates at Pearman Elementary School, in Cleveland, Miss. (AP)

In this Teach for America Delta Institute released photograph taken July 5, 2013, TFA Curriculum Specialist Miles McCauley and University of Mississippi graduate, center, discusses techniques for making key points clear and engaging with corps members, Marcae Thompson, left, and Katherine Brown, both University of Alabama graduates at Pearman Elementary School, in Cleveland, Miss. (AP)

Guests

Emily Esfahani Smith, managing editor of the monthly arts and criticism publication, The New Criterion. Managing editor of the Hoover Insitutions’ online journal, “Defining Ideas.” Editor-in-chief of Acculturated. (@EmEsfahaniSmith)

Nona Willis Aronowitz, education and poverty reporter for NBCNews.com. (nona">@nona)

D.S. Kinsel, artist and program coordinator at MGR Youth Empowerment in Pittsburgh, PA. (@DSKinsel)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Millennial Searchers — “Today’s young adults born after 1980, known as Generation Y or the millennial generation, are the most educated generation in American history and, like the baby boomers, one of the largest. Yet since the Great Recession of 2008, they have been having a hard time. They are facing one of the worst job markets in decades. They are in debt. Many of them are unemployed. The income gap between old and young Americans is widening. To give you a sense of their lot, when you search “are millennials” in Google, the search options that come up include: ‘are millennials selfish,’ ‘are millennials lazy,’ and ‘are millennials narcissistic.’”

The Atlantic Cities: Where Millennials Can Make It Now — “My generation, the Millennials, are infamously the first Americans who are not necessarily expected to do better than their parents. Having come of age during the Great Recession and now a long-lived weak job market, the assumption is not only that we’ll be less wealthy, but that the traditional markers of adulthood will be delayed. Or never achieved at all. Yet this worry also assumes today’s twentysomethings are aiming for the same things as previous generations: either to make it big in the major cities that have traditionally held the promise of success, or to settle down in the house with the white picket fence in the suburbs.”

National Journal: Millennials Abandon Obama and Obamacare — “According to the poll, 57 percent of millennials disapprove of Obamacare, with 40 percent saying it will worsen their quality of care and a majority believing it will drive up costs. Only 18 percent say Obamacare will improve their care. Among 18-to-29-year-olds currently without health insurance, less than one-third say they’re likely to enroll in the Obamacare exchanges. More than two-thirds of millennials said they heard about the ACA through the media. That’s a bad omen for Obamacare, given the intensive coverage of the law’s botched rollout. Just one of every four young Americans said they discussed the law with a friend or through social media. Harvard’s John Della Volpe, who conducted the poll, said the president has done a poor job explaining the ACA to young Americans.”

January 02 2014

19:00

How Do Smart Students Get That Way? – A Conversation with Amanda Ripley – AlbertMohler.com

Tags: education

December 19 2013

05:22

Million-Dollar-Plus College Presidents

New numbers out on what college presidents make and plenty are making a bundle.  We look at the whys of those big paychecks.

Robert Zimmer, president, University of Chicago, speaks during a panel discussion,

Robert Zimmer, president, University of Chicago, speaks during a panel discussion, “2012: The Path to the Presidency”, at the University of Chicago in Chicago on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012. He was listed as the highest-paid college president in America in a 2013 report by The Chronicle Of Higher Education. (AP)

Guests

Jack Stripling, senior reporter covering college leadership and presidential compensation for The Chronicle of Higher Education. (@JackStripling)

Raymond Cotton, partner at the Law firm of Mintz Levin and Vice President for Higher Education at ML Strategies, LLC.

Claire Potter, professor of history at the New School.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Chronicle Of Higher Education: Boards Justify High Pay for Presidents – “Mr. Zimmer occupies a rarefied stratum of higher education, leading one of just 10 private colleges with budgets greater than $3-billion. Some compensation experts say that the university’s budget, and by extension its complexity, helps explain why a board would pay Mr. Zimmer on a scale that is sure to get attention, and that could prompt criticism for a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization like the University of Chicago.”

Chicago Tribune: U. of C. president tops national pay chart –”Zimmer, 66, had made $1.6 million the previous year, placing him as the ninth highest-paid president. His large salary boost in 2011 — five years into the job — was due mostly to $1.3 million that had come due that year. That amount made up about 40 percent of his compensation and pushed him to the spot of the highest-paid president. Because it is a one-time payment, Zimmer is likely not to remain the highest-paid president in future years.”

CNN: Big debt for students, big perks for university elites – “The corporate university eliminates full-time teaching jobs whenever possible. It relies on temporary academic laborers who have few or no benefits and median salaries of $2,700 per course, salary stagnation for the majority of academic and nonacademic employees, the reduction or elimination of union jobs, and the outsourcing of essential services to corporate providers who pay minimum wage or less.”

November 21 2013

07:40

Colorado’s Polka-Dotted Middle Way

Colorado is pushing a lot of boundaries and buttons lately. On fracking, gun law, marijuana, secession. We catch up with Colorado.

Guests

Laura DiSilverionovelist, former Air Force intelligence officer. (@LauraDiSilverio)

Patty Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, professor of history. (@CenterWest)

John Long, founder and executive director of Biodiesel for Bands, a nonprofit that offers touring musical artists discounts on bio-diesel fuel and touring vehicles.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Daily Beast: Colorado’s Strange Secession Vote —  ”Eleven of Colorado’s 64 counties want to secede from the state, and there is a referendum on the ballot to that effect. It will, in all likelihood, pass. Only the voters in those 11 counties are voting on the question. Ten are contiguous, in the northeast corner of the state. In their dream world, they say sayonara to Denver and become “North Colorado.” The eleventh county is across the way, in the northwest corner. Since the U.S. Constitution mandates that states be contiguous, Moffat County would just sign up with Wyoming.”

The New Yorker: The Middleman — “Colorado is part of a national trend: red states are becoming redder and blue states are becoming bluer. According to the National Journal, an unprecedented thirty-six states are controlled by one party or the other. Activists, frustrated by the partisan gridlock in Washington, are pushing their agendas in state capitals that are dominated by a single party and thus can swiftly move legislation. Two weeks before Hickenlooper signed his gun laws, the Republican governor of South Dakota signed legislation allowing school employees to carry firearms. In April, Kansas passed one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country, while in Democratically controlled New York, Governor Cuomo unveiled a bill to guarantee in state law the protections provided by Roe v. Wade.”

The Denver Post: Polis, Hickenlooper disagree on Colorado’s fracking regulations –”Polis never took a position on the fracking bans, but Tuesday he said fracking ‘is occurring very close to where people live and work and where they raise families. Yet our state doesn’t have any meaningful regulation to protect homeowners,’ Polis said in a floor debate on a series of energy measures. ‘Unfortunately, the fracking rules are overseen by an oil and gas commission that is heavily influenced by the oil and gas industry.’”

November 16 2013

13:15

Music and conversation with Potsdam composer Robert Washburn | News from North Country Public Radio

Note: This conversation first aired February 21, 2005. We share it again upon news of the composer's death an age 85 this week. You probably don't hear his music everyday, but Robert Washburn is a cherished resident of the North Country, and a household... http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/5329/20131115/music-and-conversation-with-potsdam-composer-robert-washburn

November 15 2013

20:19

Design Education and Building Teams with the Right Skills

User experience is an amalgam of information architecture, visual design, interaction design, user research, prototyping, coding, and a host of other skill sets. Combine this complexity with the rapid rate of change in technology and techniques, and it's no wonder that there's a gap between the skills required by the industry of UX designers and those taught by design programs in colleges and universities. In this episode of The Digital Life, we discuss the state of design education and how to build teams with the right skills to ship digital products with Jared Spool, Founding Principal of User Interface Engineering. http://thedigitalife.com/5_questions/design-education-and-building-teams-with-the-right-skills

November 13 2013

12:28

Schooled Podcast: Confessions of a Bad Teacher

To listen to Schooled, Episode 2, use the player below: Subscribe in iTunes ∙ RSS feed ∙ Download ∙ Play in another tab Welcome to Schooled, Slate’s new podcast about education. This episode features two teachers with experience in high-poverty urban schools. We’ll find out why John Owens, the author of Confessions of a... http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/education/2013/11/schooled_podcast_confessions_of_a_bad_teacher.html

November 06 2013

16:25

Teaching Science Through Hip Hop : NPR

Engaging students in science class is no easy task but using hip-hop may be one way to get their attention. Research scientist Danielle Lee uses hip-hop to bridge the gap between culture and science. http://www.npr.org/2013/11/04/242990504/hip-hop-and-science-a-perfect-combo-for-students?utm_content=socialflow&utm_campaign=nprfacebook&utm_source=npr&utm_medium=facebook

November 05 2013

16:00

Flipped Schools: Homework At School, Lectures At Home

Some teachers, even whole schools, are now “flipping” their days — doing homework in class, watching lectures at home. Is this the future of school?

Everybody’s looking for a way to fire up American education, American schools.  The latest buzz is “flip it.”  Flipped classes and schools turn the old pattern of instruction upside down.  No more lectures in class and homework at home.  It’s flipped.  The other way round.  Do your homework at school, with the teacher there to guide and encourage.  Get your lecture at home, online.  On a laptop or smartphone.  Evangelists for flipped schools rave about the advantages of turning the old way on its head.  Is it more than a headstand?  Up next On Point:  “Flipped schools.”  Is this the future of school?

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Greg Green, principal of Clintondale High School, the first school in the country to completely “flip.” (@flippedschool)

Richard Halverson, professor in the department of leadership and policy analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Diana Laufenberg, lead teacher at Inquiry Schools, a new non-profit launching a school focused on one-on-one teaching. (@DLaufenberg)

From Tom’s Reading List

CNN: Flipped classrooms give every student a chance to succeed – “It’s no surprise that these issues are happening in our schools. Everyone from politicians to parents admit that our educational system isn’t working, and we’re all screaming for change.  But no one gives advice on what changes are needed to improve education. The time has come to realize that the problem isn’t simply lack of effort or money, but the misalignment of our school structure.”

New York Times: Turning Education Upside Down — “Like everything disruptive, online education is highly controversial. But the flipped classroom is a strategy that nearly everyone agrees on. ‘It’s the only thing I write about as having broad positive agreement,’ said Justin Reich, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard who studies technology and education.”

Washington Post: ‘Flipping’ classrooms: Does it make sense? – “Skeptics ask: How many subjects are really appropriate for this technique? Doesn’t this only work for motivated kids? How does it work for students who don’t have computers at home to watch videos or who live in chaotic conditions that make it impossible to absorb new material? What about teachers who deliver inspiring classroom presentations that don’t translate to video? Isn’t this all just a way to expand the school day that will leave many children behind?”

October 15 2013

16:12

Spark podcast 223: Flipping the Classroom. The Digital Skills Divide. Inequality and Digital Engagement. Laptop Distractibility. Redefining Intelligence. | Spark with Nora Young | CBC Radio

This week on Spark - Re-learning Learning. Flipping the classroom, bridging the digital divide, laptop distractibility in the classroom, and challenging the traditional measure of what it means to be "gifted". Just click the Listen button, or click here to download the mp3. http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/2013/09/06/223-flipping-the-classroom-the-digital-skills-divide-inequality-and-digital-engagement-inequality-an/
05:21

Sounding The Alarm For Basic Science Research Funding

This year’s Nobel laureates and more have sounded the alarm bell on funding basic science research, the main building blocks of civilization.  We talk to them.

Guests

Bruce Stillman, President and chief executive officer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, member of the Board of Scientific Advisers of the National Cancer Institute and of the Board of Life Sciences of the U.S. National Research Council.

Dr. James Rothman, professor of biomedical sciences and chemistry at Yale University, chair of the Yale Department of Cell Biology and shared winner of the the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2013.

Arieh Warshel, distinguished professor of chemistry at the University of Southern California and a fellow of the National Academy of Science, shared winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2013.

From Tom’s Reading List

Science: NIH Details Impact of 2013 Sequester Cuts — “ The bottom line is as grim as expected: The agency’s overall budget will fall by $1.71 billion compared to 2012, to $29.15 billion, a cut of about 5%, according to an NIH notice today. That is essentially what NIH predicted as part of the 5.1% sequestration. (Including transfers to other agencies and other adjustments in the spending bill funding NIH in 2013, the total reduction is $1.71 billion or 5.5% compared to 2012.)”

Mother Jones: Could This 2013 Nobel Prize Winner Afford College Today? – “When Randy Schekman attended the University of California-Los Angeles in the late 1960s, getting a good college education was unimaginably cheap. Student fees were just a few hundred dollars; room and board was a few hundred more. ‘I could work a summer job and pay myself for the whole school year,’ says Schekman, now a cell biologist at the University of California-Berkeley.”

Wired: How The Shutdown Is Devastating Biomedical Scientists and Killing Their Research — “I don’t think the public realizes the devastating impact that this has on scientific research. Scientific research is not like turning on and off an assembly line. Experiments are frequently long-term and complicated. They involve specific treatments and specific times. You can’t just stop and restart it. You’ve probably just destroyed the experiment. You also can’t necessarily recover. You can’t begin an experiment all over again. If you do, you’ll be set back months — if there’s even time and personnel to do it. But often, science moves rapidly, times change, and you can’t re-initiate the experiments. It’s an enormous loss to scientific research, an enormous loss of time and personnel.”

October 08 2013

12:29

Over the Monster - Season Review

An analytical look at the Boston Red Sox with Marc Normandin and Matt Kory of Over The Monster. Best mixes on planet Earth. DJs, radio, performing artists, educators, and more. Get a free podcast, share your faves. Only on PodOmatic." name="DESCRIPTION http://redsoxbeacon.podomatic.com/

September 18 2013

07:17

Diane Ravitch and The ‘Error’ of American School Reform

Education icon Diane Ravitch championed education reform from vouchers to charter schools.  Now she champions against all that.  Calls it a mistake.  We’ll ask why.

Guests

Diane Ravitch, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education in the administration of George W. Bush, author of “Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America’s Public Schools” and “The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education,” historian of education and an educational policy analyst at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. (@DianeRavitch)

Jessica Levin, education policy advisor in the Department of Education under Bill Clinton, independent education consultant and former Chief Knowledge Officer for the New Teacher Project.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Loud Voice Fighting Tide of New Trend in Education —  ”Ms. Ravitch, 75, is in the full flower of yet another stage in her career: folk hero to the left and passionate scourge of pro-business reformers. She has come to doubt the whole project of school reform, saying it will solve little without addressing poverty and segregation. ‘We know what works,’ she writes. ‘What works are the opportunities that advantaged families provide for their children.’”

Detroit Free Press: Longer Michigan Waits on Common Core, Farther Behind We Get —  ”The rigorous Core standards, developed by the National Governor’s Association and adopted by Michigan in 2010, were en route to implementation in 2014. Then state Rep. Tom McMillin, R-Rochester Hills, led a successful charge to strip funding for the standards from the state’s budget. (McMillin can’t stop obsessing about local control — a piece of choice hypocrisy when one considers that McMillin also wants to pass state legislation that would bar cities from adopting human rights ordinances. So much for local control?)”
The Atlantic: Did This Little Election Strike a Big Blow to Education Reform? — “The Bridgeport primaries were the latest front in the ongoing political war over American education. It’s a fight that has become intensely polarized, with reformers like Vallas and Michelle Rhee vilified by progressives and unions who see them as working to privatize public schools and undermine teacher unions. Vallas’s opponents say he has a record of closing schools, laying off teachers, privatizing school management, raiding pension funds, and funneling taxpayer dollars to for-profit education companies with dubious track records. Vallas says that in Bridgeport, he has not closed a single school, opened a single charter, or laid off a single teacher.”

Excerpt: “Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America’s Public Schools” by Diane Ravitch

August 27 2013

14:00

President Obama’s College Rating Plan

American universities respond to President Obama’s cost-cutting push to rank them by “value,” and punish the losers.

You want a job?  Get a college education, we’re told.  But the cost of college goes up and up.  So does student debt.

Last week, President Obama stepped squarely into the fray.  To make colleges and universities more accountable and affordable, he said.  First, by ranking every college on a best value scale.  Rank them by affordability, graduation rates, graduate debt and earnings.

And then the kicker.  The stick.  President Obama wants Washington to base federal support on those rankings.  A crowbar to rein in college costs.

This hour, On Point:  the President’s plan, academia’s response.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Roberto Rodriguez, special assistant to President Obama for education policy. Former chief education counsel for Senator Ted Kennedy.

Judith Scott-Clayton, professor of economics and education at Columbia University’s Teacher College. Senior research associate at the Community College Research Center

Bob Hildreth, founder and chairman of the nonprofit organization FUEL Education (Families United in Educational Leadership).

From Tom’s Reading List

Businessweek: Obama’s College Ratings Will Shape Student Loans – “Striking a populist pose today at the University of Buffalo, President Barack Obama said the government will create a rating system for higher education, scoring colleges in areas including average tuition, loan debt, and what graduates earn after getting their diplomas. The idea is to eventually tie student loans to these scores, directing more students to more affordable institutions and reining in the $1 trillion of outstanding federal loans.”

The New York Times: On Bus Tour, Obama Seeks to Shame Colleges Into Easing Costs – “President Obama deplored the rising costs of college on Thursday as he tried to shame universities into holding down prices. He held out the prospect of more federal student aid if they did.”

Los Angeles Times: Obama’s college ratings plan could backfire – “The United States didn’t develop its great universities by reducing higher education to equations of graduation rates and job placement. Yet on Thursday, the Obama administration revealed a plan that would push colleges in that very direction and could harm some of the students the president most wants to help.”

August 25 2013

19:45

PodOmatic | Podcast - Conspiracy Worldwide Hip Hop Radio - [Part 2] *THE NIGHT TERROR SPECIAL * w/ live guests STALLEY - WILLIE THE KID - RUN THE JEWELS (EL-P & KILLER MIKE) - DESSA from DOOMTREE - KILLAH PRIEST - BLOCK McCLOUD - CHARLIE AHEARN - CAXTON P

STREAM or DOWNLOAD On this seven hour broadcast Mista Montana and Menace do this: We catch up with Caxton-Press founder and Speakers Corner co-creator, Manage, and reflect on Chuck-D’s praise of Caxton Press’s recent show at Koko Cl..." name="DESCRIPTION http://conspiracyworldwide.podomatic.com/entry/index/2013-08-14T07_48_51-07_00
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