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February 06 2014

08:38

DGS 015 – Workflow Analog – Digital | Der gute Schnitt - Podcast

Heute mit Studiogast und Überlänge. Christoph ist Student und schreibt gerade seine Bachelor-Arbeit. Und er hat viele Fragen. Wir hoffen, wenigstens einige http://derguteschnitt.com/podcast/dgs-015-workflow-analog-digital/

January 21 2014

07:23

Cory Doctorow: Digital failures are inevitable, but we need them to be graceful - Boing Boing

Banshee fails gracefully because its authors don't attempt any lock-in. When I find myself diverging from the design philosophy of Banshee to the extent that I want to use a rival system to manage my music, Banshee is designed to assist me in switching. Unlike Apple, Microsoft, and others, who treat you as a product to be bought and sold – and who have engineered laws like the DMCA to make it illegal to convert your files for use with rival products – Banshee is designed to work with me until we part ways, and then to gracefully bow out and let me move on to someone else's version of this particular bit of plumbing. A good example of this is Amazon's MP3 store. Until recently, it worked beautifully. I'd pay a reasonable price for my music, and Amazon would let me download it to my computer with as little fuss as possible. Recently, that changed. Amazon wants to promote its cloud drive services, so now it requires that you lock yourself into an Amazon-proprietary downloader to get your MP3s. The Amazon MP3 store started life with a lot of rhetoric about liberation (they made t-shirts that trumpeted "DRM: Don't Restrict Me!") that contrasted their offering with the locked-in world of the iTunes Store. Now that Amazon has won enough marketshare in the MP3 world, it's using that position to try and gain ground in the world of cloud computing – at the expense of its customers. Lucky for me, MP3 is an open format, so MP3 investments fail well. The fact that I bought hundreds of pounds' worth of music from Amazon doesn't stop me from taking my business elsewhere now that they've decided to treat me as a strategic asset instead of a customer. By contrast, I was once unwise enough to spend thousands on audiobooks from Amazon's Audible subsidiary (the major player in the audiobook world), kidding myself that the DRM wouldn't matter. But the day I switched to Ubuntu, I realised that I was going to have to spend a month running three old Macs around the clock in order to re-record all those audiobooks and get them out of their DRM wrappers. http://boingboing.net/2014/01/20/podcast-digital-failures-are.html

November 20 2013

22:34

Bit By Bit By Bitcoin

During our Nov. 20 hour on the buzzy, big world of bitcoin, we fielded a great number of calls from listeners wondering just what, exactly, the digital currency really is.

We tackled some of the finer points in the early part of the hour, but our guest, Stanford University Graduate School of Business Economics Professor Susan Athey, provided a helpful crib sheet on the finer points of bitcoin regulation.

So far we’ve been discussing the use of bitcoin for illegal activities, and this week a lot of discussion of bitcoin as a speculative investment or a store of value.   But some argue that bitcoin has a lot of legitimate uses that have gotten less airtime.  What is your take on bitcoin?  When I look at math-based currencies, I see a revolutionary technology that allows one individual to send money to another individual instantly, securely, and without a middle man.  Current methods for sending money are archaic—if I want to send money from my Bank of America account to my Fidelity account, BOA will charge me $3 for 3-day delivery, $10 for next day, and $25 for a wire.  I still have to wait for my funds to be available on the other end.  It costs $45 to wire internationally, and there are also delays.  I’m a premium customer.  Really?  In the year 2013?  Math-based currencies offer an alternative payment rail that is instant, secure, and cheap.

You might ask, if all math-based currencies are is a payment method, why do you need new currencies at all?  The answer is that the currency is an integral part of the technology.  I can’t literally beam a physical dollar to you.  The currency is the way you keep track of who has what, and who sent how much to whom, all on a public, secure ledger.  You can call it a chit, a coin, a mark in a book—some thing has to move from me to you in the ledger, and that thing is called a bitcoin or a unit of a math-based currency.  Some next-generation math-based currencies, such as that built by a company called Ripple Labs (disclosure: I’m an advisor there), completely abstract from the underlying currency in the user experience.  A U.S. user with a dollar balance in a U.S. bank sends yen to the Japanese bank account of a Japanese customer.  The virtual currency operates behind the scenes.

What are the use cases for virtual currency?  One that I’m very interested is the developing world, where most citizens don’t have bank accounts.  You might think it is strange to consider something so technologically advanced for the world’s poor, but you have to remember that cell phone coverage is better in many African countries than in Palo Alto, CA.  In addition, countries like Kenya are actually on the cutting edge of using technology for payments.  A full one third of commerce in Kenya takes place using cell phone credits as a medium of exchange.  It works great, as anyone with a cell phone can store money there, and people send credits from phone to phone.  The problem is that the fees are large: cashing out can cost as much as 20-25%.  That’s not so great for people in poverty.

Another big use case is remittances.  Remittances are estimated to be $4-500 billion dollars a year, and are a double-digit share of GDP for a range of poor countries—Ghana, Nigeria, Nicaragua, and so on.  Yet fees are large—published estimates vary, but put fees in the 7-9% range.  Math-based currencies can be used by remitting agents and receiving banks to provide an instantaneous and low-cost way to move money across borders.  If we get to a point where retail establishments offer to change local currency to virtual in remitting and receiving cities, individual consumers could send their remittances directly to their families via mobile phone, with the only remaining fees being those charged by the local exchanges.  Since money is sometimes needed urgently at home, this can provide great benefits.

Math-based currencies also enable more electronic commerce.  Today, there’s no cost-effective way to buy hand-crafted items from most developing countries the way I can on eBay or etsy in the U.S.  And firms in Kenya with things to sell have no way to, say, buy advertising from Google in Kenyan Shillings.  So you can look at the internet from all over the world, but you can’t transact.  Math-based currencies let you send funds as easily as email.

Are there uses within a firm?  Rather than accumulate potential trades throughout the day and clear at the end to save fees, a multinational firm can send money to itself many times a day over the low-cost math-based currency rails, reducing the need to hold large balances within each country and increasing efficiency.

Hasn’t Paypal already solved this problem?  You can look to what Paypal has enabled—people can send money to each other easily within the U.S., allowing for easier fundraising and allowing e-commerce to work for individuals or small businesses who can’t afford credit card services.  But, Paypal is an institution, a middle man, that charges a fee.  Math-based currencies take that to the next level, allowing one individual to send to another using a protocol that is architected to operate without a toll collector in the middle.  The on-ramps and off-ramps for getting local currency in and out of the system do charge fees, however.

What do you think about the bitcoin price increases recently?  Well, if you expect the volume of transactions to grow a lot, then the exchange rate from dollars to bitcoins has to grow too, because each bitcoin can only be used so many times per day.  The market value of all bitcoins has to be enough to support transaction volume.  You could interpret the price increases as reflecting increased optimism about the future volume of transactions, driven by China implicitly signaling that it will allow bitcoins to be used for commerce there.

What about the extreme volatility?  Volatility is bad because it increases frictions—if I just want to send you $100, the exchange rate might change between when I buy the bitcoins and send them to you, and when you receive and cash them out.  That creates risk and frictions. But the level of the exchange rate is irrelevant for the efficiency of the payment rail—if I knew it would be $1000/bitcoin all day long, or $100/bitcoin, either way I can buy bitcoins, send them to you, and you can sell them, while avoiding paying exorbitant bank fees.  You still incur some fees when getting money in and out, but those are relatively low and should fall over time with competition.

It’s also worth checking out The Guardian’s simple, easy to read explainer on the ins-and-outs of the crypto-currency.

The apparent boom in bitcoin’s actual, bitcoin-to-dollar conversion ratio is also readily apparent in the chart below, tracing the currency’s quiet start at around $2 a share to the dizzying heights of $900 per share during this Monday’s Senate hearing on the future of digital currency.

What do you make of the bitcoin buzz? Is it a bubble? A criminal currency? Or the future of monetary exchange? Leave your thoughts below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

September 30 2013

00:11

"Raw+Jpeg" - Digital Photography Podcast 97 - The Digital Story

Weekly digital photography podcasts, photo tips, reader submitted pictures, equipment reviews and more. New Tools for the Creative Mind. The Digital Story is about making photography, music, and filmmaking enjoyable. Creativity flows better when technical issues are resolved. Instead of trying to figure out every blessed control on your digital camera, we want to show you the simple things that help it become an extension of your vision and a tool for your expression. http://thedigitalstory.com/2007/09/rawjpeg---digital-ph.html

September 16 2013

18:41

Elysium colorists

In this Episode of the Coloristos 1on1, Juan interviews Andrea Chlebak, lead DI colorist for the new sci-fi action film "Elysium". Andrea breaks down her ACES workflow, tells us about her techniques for keeping focused, and shares what it's like to grade Matt Damon's big blue eyes. All that and much more. The Coloristos ColorCast is a monthly podcast about Film and Television Color Grading, Color Science, and Post-Production. If you're interested or involved in color grading, finishing, and digital intermediate post-production, this show is for you. The Coloristos are: Josh Petok, a colorist working on reality and episodic television in Los Angeles. Juan Salvo, a colorist and online editor for films and commercials in New York. Jason Myres, a colorist and post-production engineer in Los Angeles." name="DESCRIPTION http://coloristos.podomatic.com/entry/2013-08-12T21_18_30-07_00

September 06 2013

02:07

"Insecurity Blanket, Photokina, iPhone Story" - Digital Photography Podcast 338 - The Digital Story

Weekly digital photography podcasts, photo tips, reader submitted pictures, equipment reviews and more. New Tools for the Creative Mind. The Digital Story is about making photography, music, and filmmaking enjoyable. Creativity flows better when technical issues are resolved. Instead of trying to figure out every blessed control on your digital camera, we want to show you the simple things that help it become an extension of your vision and a tool for your expression. http://thedigitalstory.com/2012/08/insecurity-blanket-p.html

July 29 2013

14:48

"Everpix Interview, Winners, Workshop" - Digital Photography Podcast 382 - The Digital Story

Weekly digital photography podcasts, photo tips, reader submitted pictures, equipment reviews and more. New Tools for the Creative Mind. The Digital Story is about making photography, music, and filmmaking enjoyable. Creativity flows better when technical issues are resolved. Instead of trying to figure out every blessed control on your digital camera, we want to show you the simple things that help it become an extension of your vision and a tool for your expression. http://thedigitalstory.com/2013/07/tds-podcast-382.html

April 11 2013

19:18

Digital Human - Engagement

Aleks Krotoski explores when captivates and beguiles and asks if the digital world can measure up to the real one.

January 29 2012

04:54

Mobile payments, Piracy and Facial Recognition - Download This Show - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Imagine doing away with your password and logging on to a website using facial recognition technology. We also examine the possibility of your mobile phone replacing your credit card. Also we wade though the numbers to find out just how much damage piracy is really doing to the entertainment industry. This week's guest panel includes Nick Ross, Editor of the ABC's Games and Technology website and Patrick Gray, cybersecurity journalist from Risky.Biz Brand new in 2012, Download This Show is your weekly access-point to the latest developments in social media, consumer electronics, digital politics, hacktivism and more. Beginning January 29, Download This Show will be presented by Marc Fennell (Hungry Beast, triple j) on Sundays at 9:30pm (with a repeat broadcast on Thursdays at 2pm), and will be available to podcast and listen online. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/downloadthisshow/29-january-2012/3790486

January 17 2012

19:12

Pico Iyer on Unplugging

Enough with the “always on” digital world. Pico Iyer is unplugging. @andynotsilver enjoyed it just fine.

December 20 2011

17:33

Niche Subscriptions on Spark

Cathi Bond is here to talk about the trend of niche publications – having a subscription that’s not to a magazine, but to actual physical objects that come in the mail. It’s a different, analog approach to customization. Hyper-curated almost. And Cathi and Nora wonder if it’s an example of a post-digital fetishization of artifacts. http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2011/12/spark-166-december-18-21-2011/

July 22 2011

09:52

Spark Special – Marshall McLuhan: Tomorrow Is Our Permanent Address

Spark presents a special hour of Marshall McLuhan-inspired programming called, Tomorrow Is Our Permanent Address, named after one of McLuhan’s own witty turns of phrase. Today marks the centenary of McLuhan’s birth, and what better way to celebrate than exploring the theories of a man who has been credited with predicting the future of technology. Includes - Why The Medium is Still The Message - The Networked City - From Rare to Everywhere (and back again!) - The Googlization of Everything

July 07 2011

04:15

Minimalism and the cult of less - RN Future Tense - 23 June 2011

A growing number of minimalists are trying to cut down on physical commodities and replace them with digital counterparts. So is it possible to live out of a hard drive? And in future could less definitely be more? http://www.abc.net.au/rn/futuretense/stories/2011/3035856.htm

March 28 2011

18:44

The Ultimate Backup — Keeping Media Alive

Archiving in the new entertainment marketplace involves much more than securely storing thousands of boxes of tape and cans of film. In order to provide the service that is really needed, the Archive must be prepared to provide the logical extension demanded by today's digital film industry business model, i.e. the ability to provide directly within hours from the secure environment of the archive to the studio what can best be called the first link in the digital supply chain. http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_FP8190

March 23 2011

21:43
21:43
21:42
21:42

January 02 2011

00:29

The Digital Commons

Host Francesca Rheannon talks with David Bollier about his latest book, VIRAL SPIRAL. It’s about how the Internet is building a new digital republic. And Cory Doctorow tells us about his science fiction novel, MAKERS. It imagines the birth pangs of a new remix culture. From http://www.writersvoice.net/2010/04/the-digital-commons/

August 10 2010

02:05

Online Tracking: Creepy Commerce?

Spying on American consumers is big business on the Internet. How companies slice, dice and sell your personal identity online.
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