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January 16 2014

20:25

Brad Frost – Creating Responsive Interfaces » UIE Brain Sparks

Brad: Yeah. I think that, yeah, more or less, that’s it. Molecules are a couple tags stitched together. You might have just a search form that’s comprised of search label, an input, and a button, and that is a self-contained little assembly of stuff that does something. Atoms by themselves, the tags are all really abstract and floating around in space. You don’t really see, inherently, just from looking at that level, how these things might be useful. It’s like, “Well, that’s nice.” It’s helpful at an at-a-glance sort of level. Then you start combining them into these little packages, these little molecules, and now they could actually start doing something. You might have your primary navigation as a molecule, your search form as a molecule, and stuff like that, and then you put those molecules together into a header organism. Now your header organism contains your logo atom and contains your navigation molecule, it contains your search-form molecule, and all those things operate at this standalone, reusable component. From there, then you start stitching these organisms together and finally start building these sort of page-level things, like templates and then, ultimately, pages, which we don’t have to get into. The idea is that you have these little clusters of elements, and then you combine those together into more complex clusters of stuff. The whole idea is to basically establish this really sound, really deliberate interface, where everything is being built up with the intention of creating a system that’s built for reuse, built for scalability. Certainly helps with responsive design because, again, you’re able to treat these problems at the component level rather than at a page level. Also, just from being future-friendly — you’re establishing these nice rules and guidelines and constraints, and this goes inside of this, which means that the new hire you hire four months down the line can understand how things are put together and why things are put together in the way that they are. I think that in my experience using this and helping create this, what we’re doing now, why we’re doing this, is that it’s no longer feasible to just throw over a handful of page templates to a client and just say, “Here’s your site. Have a nice day. Make sure I get my final paycheck.” It’s not enough to do that anymore. We have to be a lot more deliberate with this. We have to give them better tools, better resources, so that we don’t come back next year and, all of a sudden, they’ve changed the color of green and they’ve put this thing next to this thing and they’ve created a bunch of new code all on their own, in different patterns and stuff, and it all looks like a big, giant, Frankenstein mess. In part, that’s your fault if that happens, simply because you didn’t give them the library of components, you didn’t give them the building blocks, the LEGO bricks, so that if they need to add a new section to the site. If they need to add another widget, or an organism or component or whatever you want to call it, they have a language to choose from and make informed decisions. I think that that’s really, really cool. In fact, one of the clients that we first did this on — actually, the very first client that I introduced this whole atomic-design, Pattern Lab concept — was TechCrunch. I was actually just on their site last night and noticed that they had added a different component to the site. You read the article, and then there was an extra little “You might also like” sort of thing. Now, we had our own version of that, and that’s still there, but then they added a separate “You might also like these stories.” What I found is that they used the interface patterns that we provided them to construct an entirely new module. http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/16/brad-frost-creating-responsive-interfaces/
18:44

098: With Lyza Danger Gardner - ShopTalk

This week we were joined by Lyza Danger Gardner. We talked about (roughly in order): News’n’Links’n’Drama: 12:33 Web Standards Killed The HTML Star, and Is Web Design Dead? 21:40 Grunt is dead? What about Gulp? Q & A: 27:04 I’m curious to know how we as a community are handling touch events on mobile devices at the moment? Specifically referring to dropdown/fly-out menus. Is there a popular jQuery/JS library you’d recommend? 35:15 Every now and then, my job requires me to code an html email template. I usually have to look online to see what email clients can and can’t handle, but lately I’ve been getting a lot of contradictory answers. Is there a CanIUse.com for emails? 40:05 Is it possible to (and how can one) avoid code redundancy / DRY violations when supporting non-media query browsers like IE8 and below during responsive design implementation? 50:37 Can you explain a bit about what Compass is, how to use it, and what makes it so great? 58:34 What are the benefits of having a responsive design vs a separate mobile site? http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/098-lyza-danger-gardner/

January 13 2014

04:12

Hello World Podcast - Episode 1: Jeremy Likness

Shawn Wildermuth's Rants and Raves on Technologies - Software Development" name="DESCRIPTION http://wildermuth.com/hwpod/1_Jeremy_Likness

January 08 2014

16:15

Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind » UIE Brain Sparks

Jason: There is a lot of that, that can be done, and there are businesses that are amazing at that. Etsy does, in their annual reports, they now have a performance section, because performance is such a big part of what they do and such a competitive advantage that they’re reporting out on these things. And trying to make improvements in performance all the time. I think that there are a bunch of businesses that are really, really smart about this stuff and are looking at it across the whole spectrum of what needs to be done. One of the things that I find the most interesting is that, inside the performance community, people have gotten down to the point where they’re talking about different types of specific JavaScript instructions and which ones are faster and not as fast and things of that nature. That’s awesome. I’m glad that they’re doing that. That is not the stuff that I spend my time worrying about or talking to people about, because what I find over and over again is it’s the simple things that aren’t getting done. What I’m looking at in responsive design is really about, “OK, well, what is the approach that you need to do to make responsive design performant? What are the five things that you really need to keep in mind? Where do you get the most bang for your buck?” Generally, I think, even if we weren’t talking about responsive design, maybe if we were just talking about Web design in general. There’s just a handful of things. This isn’t something that’s responsive-design-specific. It’s not something that we end up talking about in the workshop or anything, because it’s not responsive-design-specific. There’s this simple instruction for a server to turn on Gzip, which is a form of compression, and it is in Apache, which is the most popular Web server. It’s three lines of configuration. It’s not even code. It’s just three lines saying, “Turn this thing on.” It’ll take text files and reduce the size of them 80 percent. It’s brain-dead simple, right, but I’ll bump into sites all the time that don’t have that on, and then designers that don’t know that that’s a thing. They don’t even know how to check to see whether their back-end developers have done it. The designer doesn’t have to know those three lines, right? All they have to know is, “Hey, this is something that I should look for,” and there are tools to check to see whether your page is doing this. They need to know that it is really, really simple, so that they can’t get somebody telling them that it’s more difficult than it is. Just say, “Look, this needs to be turned on. It would make such a big difference for our users, and it would save us money because we don’t have to pay as much for bandwidth.” All this sort of stuff. The things that I focus on are really at that level. They’re either things that designers should know, particularly when it comes to responsive design, how do you handle images, how do you do mobile-first responsive design, why is this important. They’re not designed to be like, “OK, let’s go calculate things and let’s go figure out the nitty-gritty of performance.” There’s something really satisfying about performance, because it’s the one bit of design that you do that you can actually measure results on, so it can get a little addictive. It’s like it’s got its own built-in gamification to it. If people were to start thinking about it from a responsive-design perspective and then get excited about it and go do other things, that would be awesome. That’s not what I focus on. I’m just like, “OK, you guys are going to do responsive design. Here’s how to do it well. Here’s, big-picture, what you have to keep in mind. Here are the challenges you’re going to bump into. Here’s how you do it in a way that works well and is per-formant, and here’s why you should care about performance. Here’s why it’s actually something that, as a designer is actually, impacts your job and you have the power to change it.” Sorry. That was a little rant. I just think that people get turned off of performance, for some reason that I don’t quite understand, when you don’t have to get into the nitty-gritty to just understand some big stuff that will make huge impacts. http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/01/07/jason-grigsby-responsive-web-design-with-mobile-in-mind/

December 17 2013

20:31

5by5 | The Web Ahead #58: CSS Innovation with Lea Verou

Lea Verou joins Jen Simmons to talk about CSS, and tell us all about things we can do with CSS today that you might not know about already. http://5by5.tv/webahead/58

December 16 2013

10:05

Stunning visuals with Maths and...no JavaScript? - Ana Tudor ~ Full Frontal 2013

Everybody has probably seen mathematical visualizations that were created using JavaScript. However, one thing that not everybody may know is that some of them can be perfectly replicated using nothing but HTML and CSS. This talk is going to deconstruct some examples, explain the mathematical reasoning behind, reveal a few lesser known things about certain CSS properties and show how using a preprocessor can help with keeping these demos extremely customizable while actually writing very little code.

October 23 2013

23:45

5by5 | The Web Ahead #58: CSS Innovation with Lea Verou

Lea Verou joins Jen Simmons to talk about CSS, and tell us all about things we can do with CSS today that you might not know about already. http://5by5.tv/webahead/58

October 04 2013

18:18

The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web's best and brightest

The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web. http://nonbreakingspace.tv/val-head/
18:18

The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web's best and brightest

The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web. http://nonbreakingspace.tv/daniel-ryan/
16:27

The Non-Breaking Space Show | Rachel Nabors

The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web. http://nonbreakingspace.tv/rachel-nabors/

July 16 2013

08:01

Squirrel and Moose: In Under The Line

Dylan and special guest Stephanie Hobson talk about the perils of CSS for programmers, international travel, and vacations. Also, Canadian stereotypes, American border crossings, and the surprising openness of the British. http://3rdaverad.io/shows/squirrel-and-moose/episodes/in-under-the-line/

June 25 2013

11:58

Getting Sassy with Chris Eppstein | Lullabot

August 09 2012

10:22

028: With Allison House - ShopTalk

Tags: css web html

August 06 2012

15:22

.NET Rocks! 786 Bruce Lawson Has Responsive Web Design

At NDC, Carl and Richard talk to Bruce Lawson about responsive web design. Responsive web design from Bruce's point of view is web pages that are able to adjust to the browser and device that they are being viewed on. From the huge displays on desktop PCs to the tiny screens of smartphones, you can make your web pages work effectively! Bruce talks about some of the tools and libraries available to simplify responsive web design, so check out the links from the show! Born into the tech world when he was hastily delivered on a table in the London Science Museum, Bruce evangelises Open Web Standards for Opera. He co-authored Introducing HTML5, the first book on the subject, and was a member of the W3C Mobile Web Best Practices Working Group. Previously, he's been front-end technical lead for the Law Society and Solicitors Regulation Authority web sites, tutor to a princess' daughter in Thailand, a movie extra in Bombay, and a tarot card reader in Istanbul. He blogs at brucelawson.co.uk, drinks Guinness and is training for a blue belt in kickboxing. http://www.dotnetrocks.com/default.aspx?showNum=786

March 16 2012

18:11

CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects. The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It's difficult to document patterns, and it's difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely. How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable? http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

March 09 2012

00:47

The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web's best and brightest

The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web. http://nonbreakingspace.tv/shoptalk-crossover-with-chris-coyier-and-dave-rupert/

February 23 2012

20:32

Progressive Enhancement « Episodes « EE Podcast

Aaron Gustafson, author of Adaptive Web Design, joins us to discuss progressive enhancement techniques. http://ee-podcast.com/episodes/progressive-enhancement
19:19

Progressive Enhancement « Episodes « EE Podcast

Aaron Gustafson, author of Adaptive Web Design, joins us to discuss progressive enhancement techniques. http://ee-podcast.com/episodes/progressive-enhancement

February 12 2012

05:54

The Non-Breaking Space Show | Interviews with the web's best and brightest

The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web. http://nonbreakingspace.tv/

July 20 2011

09:03

Helping users find content and take action « Boagworld

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