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December 10 2013

04:40

Bill Hybels | Main Session | The Leadership Conference

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September 08 2013

05:15

Bringing Up Confident, Happy Children - Culture and Society - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

August 31 2012

19:29

The Full Stack of Entertainment: Storytelling, Play and Code

Forget transmedia. Forget alternate and augmented realities. Forget multimedia magazines, tablets, phones and puzzling QR codes. Our challenge lies in figuring out the full-stack of entertainment, designed from the bottom right to the very top: for phones, physical objects—part of the Internet of things or otherwise—tablets and conventional computing devices, where art, code and design mesh together perfectly with directorial vision. These teams producing our next generation of entertainment are right at the heart of Steve Jobs’ placing of Apple at the intersection of liberal arts and technology. Where did they come from, how are they evolving entertainment and how are they making storytelling, play, code and technology sing? http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/dan-hon Dan Hon is a Creative Director at Wieden Kennedy in Portland, OR, where he works on the intersection between storytelling, games, play and code. A former lawyer, he’s worked for Mind Candy helping to build their first product, Perplex City, and co-founded Six to Start, an award-winning entertainment production company in 2007. He’s most known for being passionately for, and against, ARGs. He does not play World of Warcraft anymore.

March 18 2012

15:04

Adactio: Articles—Of Time And The Network

A presentation about history, networks, and digital preservation, from the Webstock conference held in Wellington, New Zealand in February 2012. Our perception and measurement of time has changed as our civilisation has evolved. That change has been driven by networks, from trade routes to the internet. Now that we have the real-time web allowing instantaneous global communication, there's a danger that we may neglect our legacy for the future. While the web has democratised publishing, allowing anyone to share ideas with a global audience, it doesn’t appear to be the best medium for preserving our cultural resources: websites and documents disappear down the digital memory hole every day. But we can change that. This presentation will offer an alternative history of technology and a fresh perspective on the future that is ours to save. http://adactio.com/articles/5312/

March 14 2012

07:30

Preserving the Creative Culture of the Web — Jason Scott, Kari Kraus, Nick Hasty

For over 20 years the web has provided continuous deluge of cultural production. Digital artifacts such as websites, images, and videos have much to communicate about our social and cultural evolution, and yet their messages or moments can be fleeting or quickly lost. Both the accessibility and longevity of digital content are subject to a wide range of risks, from technological obsolescence to outright deletion by their creator or host. So what is being done to preserve these cultural objects for the long term? Approaching web content from a cultural and artistic perspective, this panel will convene leading writers, archivists, thinkers and technologists to discuss to the questions, challenges, and imperatives involving preserving the creative culture of the web. We'll cover topics like "what is the long-term significance of a website, and why would it be worth preserving?", "should web sites and artifacts be treated like works of art or architecture?", and "how do we go about archiving digital content to ensure its accessibility and longevity?". Example initiatives to be discussed will be the Archive Team's various projects (such as the Geocities torrent), the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine, Internet Archeology, and the Rhizome ArtBase. This panel will be presented by Rhizome, an organization dedicated to the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology. http://www.archive.org/details/PreservingTheCreativeCultureOfTheWeb

January 29 2012

00:03

Annalee Newitz - Your Business Plan Is Science Fiction – And That's a Good Thing

Just two decades ago, the Web and public internet were the stuff of science fiction. Creators like William Gibson, who coined the term "cyberspace" in his novel Neuromancer, helped define the terms of social life online, as well as inspiring many of the inventions (like smartphones) that we take for granted. But what is today's science fiction telling us about where our technology will go tomorrow? I'll talk about the stories today's scifi creators are telling about the Web and internet, and how their ideas create a fantastical map of what people are seeking in their online lives. Fiction – And That's a Good Thing http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/speakers/annalee-newitz/your-business-plan-science-fiction-and-s-good-thin/

January 03 2012

17:45

Beyond The Planet of the Geeks

Brendan Dawes is a big-a-geek as anyone; he loves nothing more than making and experimenting with all the wondrous technologies, tools, toys and other magical things that constantly surround us. But the thing is, geeks never changed anything, well not in a real-world sense. Making cutting edge Javascript demos with the likes of Canvas or SVG are all well and good but for things to really change and have an impact stuff needs to move beyond the confines of the world of the geek and become common place, the norm and paradoxically, invisible! In this session Brendan takes you through his process of experimentation with purpose and how he and the team at magneticNorth are now actively using these exciting new technolgies on real client work that goes beyond *bouncing ball* demoes to create new interfaces and new ways to explore. http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule
07:52

Open Source Rockets

Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today. With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407
01:05

Open Source Rockets

Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We’re building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today. With the new proposed NASA budget eliminating the US manned spaceflight program and a heap of small private space companies popping up, the way we think about getting to space is changing. Is there room for open source in this brave new (space) world? PSAS has been working on open source avionics and hardware for small rockets for several years. We present our experience with, and thoughts on the future of, open source rocketry. http://opensourcebridge.org/sessions/407
00:58

Hacking Space Exploration by Ariel Waldman

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration. As technology shifts from a means of passive consumption to active creation, people are collaborating on a massive scale. The endeavor of Spacehack.org is to transform that into more of a community, so that space hackers can easily connect and interact. Amateurs were once considered to be at the crux of scientific discovery, but over time have been put on the sidelines. Despite this, citizen science is witnessing a renaissance. Agencies such as NASA no longer have a monopoly on the global space program and more participatory projects are coming to life to harness the power of open collaboration around exploring space on a faster schedule. Instead of complaining about where our jetpack is, we can now demand to figure out how to take an elevator to space . And, while you still can’t own a CubeSat as easily as an iPod, you can join a SEDSAT-2 team and learn how to engineer one. There’s also GalaxyZoo , which opened up a data set containing a million galaxies imaged by a robotic telescope. Why projects such as these are important is because robots are actually kind of dumb. Humans are able to make classifications that well-programmed machines can’t. Currently, 200,000 humans are identifying over 250,000 galaxies. If tinkering with spacecrafts is more your speed, the Google Lunar X PRIZE is a competition to send robots to the moon. However, you don’t need to be a robotics engineer to participate. Team FREDNET , the first open source competitor, is open for anyone to join. While the concept of open source has resonated around the world and beyond, there is still much education to be done. NASA and the ESA have made large quantities of their data open, but have yet to facilitate developer communities that allow for active contribution to the code rather than just feedback on finding bugs. Spacehack.org , a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, was created for this reason, among others. Many of these projects are buried in old government websites or do not clearly communicate how someone can get involved. It is with great hope that it will not only encourage the creation of more participatory space projects, but also urge existing ones to embrace the social web. http://lanyrd.com/2010/osbridge/sxzh/

December 05 2011

09:24

James Bridle – Waving at the Machines | Web Directions

James will discuss the architecture of datacenters, the subjectivity of Google Street View, and the pixelation of everything, in an attempt to calibrate our new position in the world. http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-waving-at-the-machines/

September 13 2011

01:50

AC Podcast: Prolific, Brilliant & Healthy | Accidental Creative

This episode features a segment from a recent conference talk in which Todd Henry covers what it means to be prolific, brilliant and healthy. http://www.accidentalcreative.com/podcasts/ac/ac-podcast-prolific-brilliant-healthy?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+acwritings+%28Accidental+Creative%3A+Productivity+%26+Creativity%29

August 26 2011

23:13

You Can Test Anything

We present a whirlwind tour of Michael Feather’s book “Working Effectively With Legacy Code,” showing and discussing specific techniques from the book, with full examples in code. Our intent is to display a variety of different ways to “slip testability into the cracks” of existing codebases.
23:13

Agile and User Experience Design

Agile developers and UX designers have a lot more in common than you might think. We’ll show that both agile design and development work best when they integrate and when users are put at the center of the process. We’ll focus on what works and what doesn’t. Much of this presentation will build off of a national research study on design and development practices as well as case studies from Adaptive Path project teams.
23:12

Facilitation Foundations: Eliminating Waste From Agile

Everyone has been to an Agile meeting that has little or no value and that’s felt like a complete waste of time. Facilitation Foundations is designed to offer attendees a chance to learn more about how to make meetings more valuable and save everyone time and money. This talk focuses on what makes meetings work and identifies negative experiences we all encounter when it comes time to attend or facilitate these common meetings. What should we be doing? What should we be avoiding? What could we do to improve the way we facilitate and or attend meetings? How can we make them more effective?
23:12

Discount Usability Testing for Agile Teams

Agile methods promise an iterative and incremental approach to building software. Unfortunately, the iterative portion is often omitted when it comes to incorporating true user feedback and observation. In this workshop, participants will learn how to apply a method known as “discount usability testing” to allow for fast and useful feedback from users that can be incorporated into their product delivery process.
23:11

Systems Thinking and the Learning Organization

Great software is only possible in a true Learning Organization. This talk gives a pragmatic exploration of the connections between Senge’s five disciplines for learning organizations and the Agile software development framework. Specifically making use of Senge’s three legged stool of Aspiration, Understanding Complexity, and Reflective Conversation, Agile provides a strong pattern for creating and changing the realities of business and customer value delivery.
23:10

Growing Up Agile

In 2000, Agile was revolutionary. In 2010, Agile is stagnant. There are two Agile worlds today: The first is pushing the same practices and processes they’ve been pushing for the last decade. The second takes many of these practices and processes for granted. Sadly, there’s little interaction between the two. In this discussion, we’ll look at the rift between the two communities, how to bridge it, and the exciting possibilities that can exist when we do.
23:10

A Tale of Two Cities - Early Adoption Stories

This experience report is about early adoption issues within two companies which share certain similarities (large, very distributed) but have differences as well (services vs products, IT vs engineering focus, close vs distant customers).
23:09

Agile Development with Interns

The intern program at inContact uses 5-10 interns every quarter for a period of 10 weeks, and has been running for 1 1/2 years. Some of the challenges with using interns are discussed:
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