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February 04 2014

12:32

Podcast: What does David Cameron's Great Firewall look like? - Boing Boing

David Cameron's attempt to create a Made-in-Britain version of Iran's "Halal Internet" is the worst of both worlds for parents like me. Kids are prevented from seeing things that they need to access – sites about sexual health, for example – and I still have to monitor my daughter all the time when she uses the net (or teach her how to cope with seeing things no kid should see) because the filter won't stop her from accessing the bad stuff. And for parents who don't understand that filters are bunkum, the situation is much worse. It's one thing to know that there are risks to your kid from the internet. But parents who rely on the filter are living in bubble of false security. There's nothing more deadly than a false sense of security: If you know your car is having brake problems, you can compensate by driving with extra care, increasing your following distance, and so on. If you falsely believe your brakes to be in good running order, you're liable to find out the hard way that they aren't (if you survive, you can thank Bruce Schneier for that apt and useful analogy). http://boingboing.net/2014/02/03/podcast-what-does-david-camer.html

January 07 2014

23:30

THE DATABASE NATION, a.k.a THE STATE OF SURVEILLANCE

23rd of December 2008 was a sad day in India for civil liberties. On this day, The Indian Parliament passed the "The Information Technology (Amendment) Act" with no debate in the House, which effectively means is that the government of India now has the power to monitor all digital communications in the country without a court order or a warrant. The "world's largest democracy" strongly leaning towards becoming a surveillance state raises many questions and poses severe challenges for free speech and economic justice in India and globally. This talk will map and review the current political, socio-cultural and legal landscape of mass-surveillance, data protection and censorship in India and analyse how it ties in to the global landscape of surveillance and censorship. It will also aim to create a discussion space to investigate the deeper effects of these so called "welfare" projects and how citizen-led movements can drive the state towards stronger data protection and privacy laws. Section 69 of the act states, "Section 69 empowers the Central Government/State Government/ its authorized agency to intercept, monitor or decrypt any information generated, transmitted, received or stored in any computer resource if it is necessary or expedient so to do in the interest of the sovereignty or integrity of India, defence of India, security of the State, friendly relations with foreign States or public order or for preventing incitement to the commission of any cognizable offence or for investigation of any offence". What this effectively means is that the government of India now has the power to monitor all digital communications in the country without a court order or a warrant. Since then, India has gone on to setup several projects which leverage technology to freely collect, mine, share and commoditize citizen data, resulting in a massive intelligence network. These include the world’s largest biometric ID scheme (Aadhaar/UID), the Central Monitoring System(CMS), the Telephone Call Interception System (TCIS), a DNA data bank and the National Intelligence Grid (NATGRID). The "world's largest democracy" strongly leaning towards becoming a surveillance state raises many questions and poses severe challenges for free speech and economic justice, not just in India but globally. This talk will map and review the current political, socio-cultural and legal landscape of mass-surveillance, data protection and censorship in India and analyse how it ties in to the global landscape of surveillance and censorship. It will also aim to create a discussion space to investigate the deeper effects of these so called "welfare" projects and how citizen-led movements can drive the state towards stronger data protection and privacy laws. ABOUT THE SPEAKER Kaustubh Srikanth is a hactivist, technologist and researcher based between Berlin and Bangalore. He is one of the lead organisers of the annual Open Data Camp in India and currently works as the Head of Technology at Tactical Tech (https://tacticaltech.org), an international NGO working to enable the effective use of information for progressive social change. http://events.ccc.de/congress/2013/Fahrplan/events/5421.html Day: 2013-12-30 Start time: 14:00 Duration: 01:00 Room: Saal 2 Track: Ethics, Society & Politics Language: en

September 30 2013

08:27

Echoes of moral panic in art controversies - Books and Arts Daily

Artistic freedom and the threat of censorship are again dominating debate in the art world. Several controversial artworks have been removed or censored, so are we experiencing moral panic in the arts? http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/booksandartsdaily/moral-panic-in-the-arts/4988246

March 12 2012

23:13

Cory Doctorow's Podcast: Censorship is inseparable from surveillance

Here's a podcast of my last Guardian column, Censorship is inseparable from surveillance: There was a time when you could censor without spying. When Britain banned the publication of James Joyce's Ulysses in the 1920s and 1930s, the ban took the form on a prohibition on the sale of copies of the books. Theoretically, this entailed opening some imported parcels, and it certainly imposed a constraint on publishers and booksellers. It was undoubtedly awful. But we've got it worse today. Jump forward 80 years. Imagine that you want to ban www.jamesjoycesulysses.com due to a copyright claim from the Joyce estate. Thanks to the Digital Economy Act and the provision it makes for a national British copyright firewall, we're headed for a system where entertainment companies can specify URLs that have "infringing" websites, and a national censorwall will block everyone in the country from visiting those sites. In order to stop you from visiting www.jamesjoycesulysses.com, the national censorwall must intercept all your outgoing internet requests and examine them to determine whether they are for the banned website. That's the difference between the old days of censorship and our new digital censorship world. Today, censorship is inseparable from surveillance. Huffduffed from http://craphound.com/?p=3921

October 30 2011

11:17

Let's Get Naughty with Banned Books - ABC Queensland - Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)

You don't often hear of books being banned from publication these days, but it might happen more often than you think. We went back in time this afternoon with Joan Bruce from the State Library of - Let's Get Naughty with Banned Books http://blogs.abc.net.au/queensland/2009/09/lets-get-naughty-with-banned-books.html?program=capricornia_drive

April 30 2011

06:41

September 14 2010

12:13

Religious Search Engines Yield Tailored Results

In a world where Google has put every bit of information at our fingertips, some people are now demanding less information when they surf the Internet. Some Jews, Muslims and Christians are abandoning Yahoo and Google and turning to search engines with results that meet their religious standards.

August 02 2010

16:39

43: Train Spotting from socialmediawhitenoise.com

A podcast recorded where I live in Horsham. I'd better listen to it then.
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