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February 20 2014

07:28

December 31 2013

10:41

Mentors For A New Career

This Program Is Rebroadcast From September 25, 2013

Want to start a new career? A new business? We have the ready mentors for you. With real world advice.

This June 3, 2013 photo shows chef Dominique Ansel making Cronuts, a croissant-donut hybrid, at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York. (AP)

This June 3, 2013 photo shows chef Dominique Ansel making Cronuts, a croissant-donut hybrid, at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York. (AP)

It’s been a wild economic ride for years now.  Or just a grind for many, just hanging on, hanging in.  Maybe you’ve dreamed of throwing over the plod of a dull career.

Maybe you’ve been thrown.  Pushed by dreams or necessity into starting something new.  A new career, a new line of work.  A new coffee shop, or hair salon, or organic farm, or app factory.  What’s it really take to make a go of it?  The nitty-gritty requirements?

Most people don’t know.  But you can ask.  Find a mentor in the biz.  Get a leg up.

This hour, On Point:  What it really takes to chase that new dream, make that change.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Brian Kurth, founder & CEO of Pivot Planet and Pivot Enterprise, two online services that match mentors in different fields with people looking to start a new career in those fields. (@briankurth7)

Kathy Krepcio, executive director of the Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. (@krepcio)

Duncan Goodall, a PivotPlanet mentor and owner of Koffee on Audubon, a coffee shop in New Haven Connecticut.

Melissa Owen, co-owner with her husband Gerry of the Fourteen-Eighteen Coffee House.  They were mentored by Duncan Goodall via PivotPlanet. Former operating room nurse.

Samantha Swaim, a PivotPlanet mentor and head of her own event planning and charity fundraising firm, Samantha Swaim Fundraising.

From Tom’s Reading List

The New York Times: Taste-Testing a Second Career, With a Mentor – ”PivotPlanet lists mentors in about 200 fields, from acupuncturist to pet therapist to television host. Want to be a meteorologist? Paul Cousins of Portland, Me., will Skype you some advice for $84 an hour. Want to be a winemaker? The site lists four mentors. Interested in becoming a ‘tiny home builder’? Brad Kittel, in Luling, Tex., will show you how.”

Richmond Times-Dispatch: Things to consider before changing careers – ”Before changing careers, it’s best to sit down and honestly assess what is motivating your potential move. If you harbor a strong desire to pursue a passion and make it your career, then changing careers is probably something you must do. But if you are changing careers because you feel slighted by a current employer or you feel like changing for the sake of change, then you might want to reconsider.”

Forbes: How To Reinvent Yourself Into A New Career – ”Changing careers and reinventing yourself isn’t easy – particularly when you’re passionate about a new field with no clearly-defined point of entry. But as Yost’s experience shows, being clear about your goals and steadily moving forward on your plan can get you there. How are you reinventing yourself?”

December 03 2013

16:00

The High-Tech Hiring Market Of Today

They see you when you’re sleeping. They know when you’re awake. Employers move to digital assessment in hiring, firing and promotion. We’ll check in.

Old-school hiring and promotion could boil down to some pretty basic stereotypes. A firm handshake and a go-getter attitude. New-school hiring and promotion looks a lot more like baseball’s Moneyball approach.  Show me the stats.  Never mind the handshake, maybe even the job interview.  Show me the data.  The proof of performance.  The statistical indicators that this person will succeed at the job.  Big data is all around us now.  We understand it and its consequences in the realm of credit scores.  You may soon have a number on your “hirability.” This hour On Point:  the data-driven hire.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Don Peck, deputy editor of The Atlantic Magazine. Author of “Pinched: How The Great Recession Has Narrowed Our Futures And What We Can Do About It.”

Teri Morse, vice president of Human Resources and recruiting at Xerox Services.

Guy Halfteck, founder and CEO of Knack, a technology-startup that uses gaming to understand and analyze potential. (@GotKnack)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Atlantic: They’re Watching You at Work — “The application of predictive analytics to people’s careers—an emerging field sometimes called ‘people analytics’—is enormously challenging, not to mention ethically fraught. And it can’t help but feel a little creepy. It requires the creation of a vastly larger box score of human performance than one would ever encounter in the sports pages, or that has ever been dreamed up before. To some degree, the endeavor touches on the deepest of human mysteries: how we grow, whether we flourish, what we become. Most companies are just beginning to explore the possibilities. But make no mistake: during the next five to 10 years, new models will be created, and new experiments run, on a very large scale.”

Wall Street Journal: Meet the New Boss: Big Data — “For more and more companies, the hiring boss is an algorithm. The factors they consider are different than what applicants have come to expect. Jobs that were once filled on the basis of work history and interviews are left to personality tests and data analysis, as employers aim for more than just a hunch that a person will do the job well. Under pressure to cut costs and boost productivity, employers are trying to predict specific outcomes, such as whether a prospective hire will quit too soon, file disability claims or steal.”

The Economist: Robot recruiters — “The problem with human-resource managers is that they are human. They have biases; they make mistakes. But with better tools, they can make better hiring decisions, say advocates of ‘big data.’ Software that crunches piles of information can spot things that may not be apparent to the naked eye. In the case of hiring American workers who toil by the hour, number-crunching has uncovered some surprising correlations.”

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