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August 04 2012

00:57

Part Four - Your ABC: heritage, change, convergence, and the road ahead - Special Broadcasts - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

In this hour, how has the ABC interacted with its audiences since its inception in 1932? In the early years, it came in the form of live concerts, performed to a studio audience and broadcast direct to air and, from the outset, there were always programs which relied on listener correspondence. Its education programs were devised to be participatory in schoolrooms around the country, and its English language broadcasts, created for the large influx of migrants who came to Australia after the Second World War, attempted to re-create a one-to-one language lesson between teacher and student. Interaction and a sense of community combined with education and entertainment was the key to the long-running and extremely popular Argonauts program for children (who joined the program's club) which connected listeners right around the country. The internet, and the consequent development of ABC online, has extended and transformed the ways in which audiences now participate with the ABC. From its news and current affairs online sites, to its virtual community hubs such as Pool and ABC Open, even its traditional platforms, like talk radio and television programs, have been shaped by the new media technologies—today talkback radio incorporates as many phone text messages and emails as it does telephone calls from listeners, and television programs like Q&A have pioneered the incorporation of audience participation using new technology. In this segment: the ABC's role during emergencies and natural disasters, and its long record of ground-breaking investigative journalism. It is this latter part of the organisation's story that, for some observers of the ABC and for media analysts, is most at risk of being eroded. This issue is examined, along with other questions, in a discussion about the future of the national public broadcaster. Guests: Ken Inglis, historian, author of This is the ABC Frank Moorhouse, writer Malcolm Fraser, former prime minister of Australia, 1975–1983 Brenda L Croft, visual artist Debra Oswald, writer for film, television, stage, radio and children's fiction Melissa Sharpe, President, Friends of the ABC, Tasmania branch June Factor, Friends of the ABC, Victoria Malcolm Long, Principal, Malcolm Long & Associates, former deputy managing director of the ABC Lee Burton, media analyst Professor Dennis Altman, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences, Latrobe University Richard White, historian, University of Sydney http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/specialbroadcasts/80th-anniversary-1600--1700/4148900
00:55

Part Three - An open window: bringing the world to you - Special Broadcasts - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

We’re delving into an ABC that takes you places—in your head via sound, and through images on our television screens. From pioneering radio plays and book readings, through location based audio documentaries, to natural history programs, first on radio, and later on television, the ABC has offered audiences a window on the world. Guests: Leslie Rees, First federal Drama Editor of ABC Radio, appointed 1936 Anne McInerney, former producer, ABC Radio Drama and Features Debra Oswald, writer for film, television, stage, radio and children's fiction Irene Poinkin, ABC Language and Research Specialist Chris Thompson, ABC sound engineer Brenda L Croft, visual artist Gary Bartholomew, Producer, ABC Networked Local Radio John Cargher Amanda Smith, presenter/producer, The Body Sphere program, Radio National http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/specialbroadcasts/80th-anniverasry-1500--1600/4148880
00:52

Part Two - Telling it how it is: truth, taste and testimony - Special Broadcasts - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The speech heard on radio and television was initially the preserve of professionals and generally scripted. Unscripted discussion, loosely the form which is a well entrenched part of most radio today, began on the ABC during the Second World War. But the speakers who end up on the radio, and what they have to say, has sometimes been a contentious issue for the ABC. And, for the national public broadcaster, it has not only been about what can and cannot be uttered, but also about the accent, the sound of the spoken word. In this segment we explore how language has been a central issue throughout the ABC’s 80 years—from pronunciation and grammar to questions of obscenity, censorship, and freedom of speech. Guests: Richard Buckham, Network Manager, ABC Classic FM Norman May, veteran ABC Sports broadcaster Meredith Burgmann, former leader of the NSW Legislative Council Robyn Archer, singer, writer, creative director of Centenary of Canberra (2013) and artistic director of The Lights in Winter (Melbourne) Tim Bowden, Broadcaster, radio and television documentary maker, oral historian and author. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/specialbroadcasts/80-anniversary/4148872
00:50

Part One - On the air: voices, music, news and views - Special Broadcasts - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The ABC’s on-air history is made up of words, mostly spoken words, uttered by thousands of guests and  presenters. From its inception in 1932, Australia's national public broadcaster has also been the subject of discussion and debate. The nature of broadcasting, and the ABC, are constantly changing—they’re a work in progress. Trying to keep ahead of the transformations and shifts in how the broadcast media is made, delivered and received is complex, and forecasting on the future of the media, and its nexus with technology is a serious business. Over this afternoon, we’ll be looking back into the past and forward into the future of the ABC; the view is complicated by the fact that past, present and future don’t divide up neatly but, rather, they co-exist and overlap. In the first hour of this anniversary special speakers include historians, anthropologists, writers and broadcasters, along with some of the ABC's multifaceted audience. Plus archival excerpts from popular programs, from education and music to dramas and documentaries. Guests: Dr Genevieve Bell, Cultural Anthropologist, Director, Intel Corporation Interaction and Experience Research Ken Inglis, historian, author of This is the ABC Professor Jock Given, Professor of Media and Communications, Institute of Social Research, Swinburne University Shane Maloney, author Lindy Burns, Presenter, Evenings, 774 ABC Melbourne Dr Michelle Arrow, Historian, Macquarie University http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/specialbroadcasts/80th-anniversary-1300--1400/4148870

April 02 2011

06:33

The Book Show

Increasingly, public libraries lend digital books as part of their expanding range of services, but the future of e-lending is far from clear. In this report, we look at how the digital shift will change the way libraries work.

January 21 2011

00:59

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 1 The Global Moment Glyn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
00:57

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 2 A Lectern in a Dusty Room Glyn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
00:54

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 5 Fired with Enthusiasm Glyn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
00:54

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 6 The Republic of Learning Glyn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
00:54

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 3 Research: a mere excuse for idleness Glyn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
00:52

ABC Radio National - The Boyer Lectures Lecture 4 Becoming a Citizen Glynn Davis

The Boyer Lectures are a series of talks by prominent Australians, chosen by the Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation to present their ideas on major social, scientific or cultural issues. The lectures showcase great minds examining key issues and values. http://www.abc.net.au/rn/boyerlectures/default.htm
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