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February 24 2014

07:10

January 08 2014

05:51

The War On Poverty: 50 Years On

Fifty years after America’s declaration of war on poverty, we’ll look at what’s been won, and what lost. Look for new thinking.

President Lyndon B. Johnson visit to Tom Fletcher residence during Poverty Tour of Appalachia (Courtesy LBJ Presidential Family).

President Lyndon B. Johnson visit to Tom Fletcher residence during Poverty Tour of Appalachia (Courtesy LBJ Presidential Family).

Guests

Michael Katz, professor of history, University of Pennsylvania. Author “The Undeserving Poor: America’s Enduring Confrontation.”

Melissa Boteach, director of poverty prosperity program at the Center for American Progress. Coordinates “Half In Ten: The Campaign to Cut Poverty in Half in Ten Years.” (@MBoteach)

Lee Ohanian, professor of economics, University of California Los Angeles. Where he director of the Ettinger Family Program in Macroeconomic Research.

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Alternative Poverty Rate Stuck at 16% — “In September, Census reported the nation’s official poverty rate, which stood unchanged at 15% of the population in 2012—well above the 12.5% level in 2007, before the recession. Some 46.5 million Americans were below the official poverty line of $23,492 for a family of four. On Wednesday, Census reported a more comprehensive measure — one designed to account for anti-poverty programs, regional differences in housing costs and necessary out-of-pocket medical expenses — that showed that 49.7 million people were “poor,” an increase of about 3 million from the official measure. The supplemental poverty rate was 16% in 2012, not significantly different from 16.1% in 2011.”

The Nation: Fifty Years Later, the War on Poverty Must Be Renewed — “But there is a still a long way to go before achieving President Johnson’s stated objective: ‘total victory.’ The tragic misadventure in Vietnam distracted the administration and the country from the one war President Johnson actually did declare, and more recent decades have seen the war on poverty co-opted by the proponents of austerity and turned into an unrelenting war on the poor.”

Washington Post: Paul Ryan’s claim that $15 trillion has been spent on the war on poverty — “The poverty rate is determined by the U.S. Census, and generally such government figures are fairly authoritative. The poverty rate is now about 15 percent, and the last time it was this high was in 1993. Ryan spokesman Conor Sweeney said that was the year that Ryan was referencing when he said ‘in a generation.’ (Okay, a generation is generally defined as 30 years, but 20 may be fine for government work.)”

December 03 2013

16:00

The High-Tech Hiring Market Of Today

They see you when you’re sleeping. They know when you’re awake. Employers move to digital assessment in hiring, firing and promotion. We’ll check in.

Old-school hiring and promotion could boil down to some pretty basic stereotypes. A firm handshake and a go-getter attitude. New-school hiring and promotion looks a lot more like baseball’s Moneyball approach.  Show me the stats.  Never mind the handshake, maybe even the job interview.  Show me the data.  The proof of performance.  The statistical indicators that this person will succeed at the job.  Big data is all around us now.  We understand it and its consequences in the realm of credit scores.  You may soon have a number on your “hirability.” This hour On Point:  the data-driven hire.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Don Peck, deputy editor of The Atlantic Magazine. Author of “Pinched: How The Great Recession Has Narrowed Our Futures And What We Can Do About It.”

Teri Morse, vice president of Human Resources and recruiting at Xerox Services.

Guy Halfteck, founder and CEO of Knack, a technology-startup that uses gaming to understand and analyze potential. (@GotKnack)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Atlantic: They’re Watching You at Work — “The application of predictive analytics to people’s careers—an emerging field sometimes called ‘people analytics’—is enormously challenging, not to mention ethically fraught. And it can’t help but feel a little creepy. It requires the creation of a vastly larger box score of human performance than one would ever encounter in the sports pages, or that has ever been dreamed up before. To some degree, the endeavor touches on the deepest of human mysteries: how we grow, whether we flourish, what we become. Most companies are just beginning to explore the possibilities. But make no mistake: during the next five to 10 years, new models will be created, and new experiments run, on a very large scale.”

Wall Street Journal: Meet the New Boss: Big Data — “For more and more companies, the hiring boss is an algorithm. The factors they consider are different than what applicants have come to expect. Jobs that were once filled on the basis of work history and interviews are left to personality tests and data analysis, as employers aim for more than just a hunch that a person will do the job well. Under pressure to cut costs and boost productivity, employers are trying to predict specific outcomes, such as whether a prospective hire will quit too soon, file disability claims or steal.”

The Economist: Robot recruiters — “The problem with human-resource managers is that they are human. They have biases; they make mistakes. But with better tools, they can make better hiring decisions, say advocates of ‘big data.’ Software that crunches piles of information can spot things that may not be apparent to the naked eye. In the case of hiring American workers who toil by the hour, number-crunching has uncovered some surprising correlations.”

June 23 2013

21:27

Job Searching While Black: What's Behind The Unemployment Gap?

August 06 2010

21:25

The toll of losing your job

We take a closer look at the emotional and physical toll of losing your job. Henry Farber, professor of economics at Princeton University. He is an expert on the US labor market. Rina Dubin, psychologist in private practice for more than 25 years. Dwight Frazee lost his job as a construction worker in 2008. He has exhausted his [...]

July 12 2010

14:00

Downscale Work and the Unemployed

The harsh new American debate over unemployment benefits. Should the unemployed just grab a shovel? Dig a ditch? Are those jobs even there?

June 08 2010

14:00

Elizabeth Warren, Consumer Crusader

Middle class crusader and scourge to fat-cat bankers, Elizabeth Warren, on what Washington needs to do to protect Americans. We present a special broadcast.
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