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January 22 2014

08:40

Jail Time And Violent Juvenile Offenders

Fighting for life without parole for young offenders. Tough states do not want to back down – or re-open old cases.

State Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley, right, hugs Assemblyman Katcho Achadjian, R-San Luis Obispo after he cast a vote for her bill that would give teenage criminals with long-term prison sentences, a chance for parole, during the Assembly session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. By a 51-21 vote, the Assembly approved Hancock's SB260 which would create a parole review process for cases where an individual, who was younger than 18 at the time of the offense and prosecuted as an adult, would be able to come up for parole after serving a lengthy minimum sentence. (AP)

State Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley, right, hugs Assemblyman Katcho Achadjian, R-San Luis Obispo after he cast a vote for her bill that would give teenage criminals with long-term prison sentences, a chance for parole, during the Assembly session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. By a 51-21 vote, the Assembly approved Hancock’s SB260 which would create a parole review process for cases where an individual, who was younger than 18 at the time of the offense and prosecuted as an adult, would be able to come up for parole after serving a lengthy minimum sentence. (AP)

Guests

Erik Eckholm, national legal correspondent for The New York Times. (@eckholm)

Jody Kent Lavy, director and national coordinator at The Campaign For the Fair Sentencing of Youth. (@jkentlavy)

Paul Downing, son of Janet Downing, who was murdered by Edward O’Brien in Somervile, MA in 1995.

David Freed, district attorney for Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. President of the Pennsylvanian District Attorneys Association.

Jeanne Bishop, assistant public defender in the office of the Cook County, Illinois Public Defender. Sister of Nancy Bishop Langert, who was shot to death at age 25 along with her husband and their unborn child. (@jeannebishop)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Juveniles Facing Lifelong Terms Despite Rulings – “Lawsuits now before Florida’s highest court are among many across the country that demand more robust changes in juvenile justice. One of the Florida suits accuses the state of skirting the ban on life without parole in non-homicide cases by meting out sentences so staggering that they amount to the same thing. Other suits, such as one argued last week before the Illinois Supreme Court, ask for new sentencing hearings, at least, for inmates who received automatic life terms for murder before 2012 — a retroactive application that several states have resisted.”

Detroit Free Press: Parole hearings on hold for 360 Michigan juveniles serving life sentences – “The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has granted Attorney General Bill Schuette a stay of a federal judge’s order that would require parole hearings for about 360 Michigan juveniles now serving life sentences for murder with no possibility of parole. Today’s order is an early Christmas gift for families of murder victims who have been traumatized by the possible release of teenaged murderers sentenced to life without parole,’ Schuette said in a news release.”

NPR: Unlikely Advocates For Teen Killers: Victims’ Families — “One man’s mother had been killed by four teenage girls. Another man’s son was killed by a teenage boy. Yet all of them want the court to find life without parole for juveniles unconstitutional. It’s not a group you often hear about. Many in the room said they frequently are unwilling to share their feelings about the issue because they have been accused of not missing their loved ones enough. On this day, there was enough sorrow in the room to fill an afternoon — but also enough forgiveness.”

08:40

Tech Companies And American Privacy

Beyond the N.S.A. Legal scholar Jeffrey Rosen says we need a constitutional amendment to protect our online privacy from Internet companies. He’s with us.

Former U.S. President James Madison. Though Judge Richard Leon said

Former U.S. President James Madison. Though Judge Richard Leon said “James Madison, who cautioned us to beware of ‘the abridgment of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power,’ would be aghast” in a recent ruling against the N.S.A., Jeffrey Rosen thinks Madison would miss some of the legal limits of modern privacy. (Creative Commons)

Guests

Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington Law School. Legal affairs editor of The New Republic. President and Chief Executive of the National Constitution Center. (@RosenJeffrey)

Adam Thierer, senior research fellow, Technology Policy Program at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. (@AdamThierer)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Madison’s Privacy Blind Spot – “The debate between Judge Leon and Judge Pauley echoes the one between Federalists and Anti-Federalists about the proper scope of government, one Madison, a moderate for his time, so effectively straddled.”

U.S. News & World Report: Relax and Learn to Love Big Data — “In recent years, concerns about our digital privacy have been exacerbated by the growth of ‘big data,’ or massive data sets that are used by companies and other organizations to catalog information about us. These data sets are used to tailor new and better digital services to us and also to target ads to our interests, which helps keep online content and service cheap or free. But some critics still fear the ramifications for our privacy of all this data being collected.”

Bloomberg Businessweek: Security Expert Bruce Schneier Says to Foil NSA Spies, Encrypt Everything — “There is some good news in the Snowden documents, Schneier said, and that’s that encryption still works. The NSA has often been able to get around it because other parts of the equation, like software or hardware, are insecure. Still, most current cryptography gives the NSA some trouble, and a lot of the data that the NSA snags isn’t encrypted. That means we’re making it too easy for the NSA to pursue its ‘collect everything’ mania. Schneier’s solution: encrypt everything we can, from the cloud to cell phones.”

January 21 2014

09:50

Is Net Neutrality Dead?

Net neutrality and a fork in the road for the Internet. We’ll look at what the Internet is really going to be.

Netflix's Ted Sarandos seen at the Netflix Signature Gala at 2013 TIFF, on Sunday, Sep, 8, 2013 in Toronto. Netflix is one of many companies that could be affected by a court-ordered change in the F.C.C.'s 'net neutrality' policy, where Internet Service Providers can charge different rates for different quantities of available data downloads. The streaming movie and TV provider requires access to massive amounts of data streaming to play video. (AP)

Netflix’s Chief Content Officer  Ted Sarandos seen at the Netflix Signature Gala at 2013 TIFF, on Sunday, Sep, 8, 2013 in Toronto. Netflix is one of many companies that could be affected by a court-ordered change in the F.C.C.’s ‘net neutrality’ policy, where Internet Service Providers can charge different rates for different quantities of available data downloads. The streaming movie and TV provider requires access to massive amounts of data streaming to play video. (AP)

Guests

Brian Fung, technology policy reporter for The Washington Post. (@b_fung)

John Bergmayer, senior staff attorney at Public Knowledge, a not-for-profit public interest group. (@bergmayer)

Randolph May, President of the Free State Foundation. (@fsfthinktank)

Jennifer Rexford, professor of computer science at Princeton University. Serves on the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Advisory Committee. (@jrexnet)

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: 11 questions you were too afraid to ask about net neutrality — “Running a network is expensive. Some believe that if you use more data, you should pay for it — in the same way that your utility company charges you for using more water or more electricity. And companies that operate the networks are always looking for new ways to bring in revenue so that they can make more upgrades — or, if you’re a cynic, so that they can line their pockets.”

Los Angeles Times:  ’Net neutrality’ ruling could be costly for consumers, advocates say –”The agency will consider appealing the decision or taking other options, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said, ‘to ensure that these networks on which the Internet depends continue to provide a free and open platform for innovation and expression and operate in the interest of all Americans.’ In the short term, the ruling left big telecom companies, small businesses, government agencies and consumers scrambling to understand its effect and making their cases about how they believe the FCC should proceed.”

The Atlantic: No, Netflix Is Not Doomed By the Net Neutrality Decision — “There is an even easier solution for net-neutrality fans. The FCC could decide it has the political cover and popular support to declare broadband providers utilities, like landline phones or roads. This would make Internet providers subject to so-called ‘common carrier’ rules, which would keep them from discriminating against certain services, such as Netflix.”

January 20 2014

07:10

More Iran Sanctions: Leverage, Or ‘A Path To War’?

As a new nuclear deal goes into effect with Iran, a growing number of US Senators call for still tougher sanctions. The White House says that’s the path to war.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, center, arrives at the 27th International Islamic Unity Conference in Tehran, Iran, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. (AP)

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, center, arrives at the 27th International Islamic Unity Conference in Tehran, Iran, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. (AP)

Guests

Robin Wright, journalist and author, distinguished scholar at the United States Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center. Author of “Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World,” “The Iran Primer: Power Politics and U.S. Policy” and “The Islamists are Coming: Who They Really Are.” (@wrightr)

Peter Beinart, contributing editor at The Atlantic and The National Journal. Associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York. Author of “The Crisis Of Zionism,” “The Good Fight: Why Liberals — And Only Liberals — Can Win the War on Terror and Make America Great Again” and “The Icarus Syndrome: A History of American Hubris.” (@PeterBeinart)

Mark Dubowitz, executive director of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Co-chair of the project on U.S. Middle east Non-Proliferation Strategy. Co-author of nine studies on economic sanctions against Iran. (@dubo1968)

From Tom’s Reading List

TIME: A New Beginning In Tehran — “Since President Hassan Rouhani’s upset victory in last summer’s election, Iran has been consumed with a strategic recalibration. The signing of the short-term nuclear deal in November, which diplomats will spend the next six months trying to turn into an enduring pact, generated tangible change in Iran’s relations with the world. And among ordinary Iranians, it’s no longer off-limits to talk openly about eventual reconciliation with a country long known as the Great Satan.”

Haaretz: U.S. Senate sanctions bill is all about torpedoing a nuclear deal with Iran — “Even if a reasonable time frame were specified, there’s a bigger problem. By insisting that Obama certify an end to Iranian missile tests and support for terrorism, Menendez and company are insisting that a final deal cover subjects it was never meant to cover. The interim agreement makes clear that the sole goal of current negotiations is to “ensure [that] Iran’s nuclear programme will be exclusively peaceful.”

Wall Street Journal: A Bad Agreement Likely to Get Worse — “In the absence of verifiable Iranian commitments not to proceed with nuclear-weapon and ballistic-missile research, there is nothing to stop Iran from having a designed bomb and ballistic missile ready to go. Once Iran completes a dash to weapons-grade uranium, it can insert the warhead and quickly have a deliverable nuclear weapon.”

January 19 2014

01:51

Cory Doctorow: Hacking Politics - YouTube

Computers permeate almost every aspect of our lives. To fully understand the world we live in, we must understand computers and the language of 1s and 0s the... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4y3btcBD-o

January 16 2014

07:01

NSA Reform And Resistance

Reforming the NSA. The President prepares to speak. The whole world is waiting to hear. We’ll go to Washington, Silicon Valley and beyond.

The cover story of the February 2014 issue of

The cover story of the February 2014 issue of “WIRED” (shown here) focuses on how NSA push back nearly “killed” public trust in technology. (courtesy WIRED Magazine)

Guests

Siobhan Gorman, terrorism, counter-terrorism and intelligence reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@Gorman_Siobhan)

Steven Levy, senior staffwriter for Wired. Author of “In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works and Shapes Our Lives” and “Crypto: How the Code Rebels Beat the Government Saving Privacy In the Digital Age.” (@StevenLevy)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wired: How The N.S.A. Almost Killed The Internet — “If the net were seen as a means of widespread surveillance, the resulting paranoia might affect the way people used it. Nations outraged at US intelligence-gathering practices used the disclosures to justify a push to require data generated in their countries to remain there, where it could not easily be hoovered by American spies. Implementing such a scheme could balkanize the web, destroying its open essence and dramatically raising the cost of doing business. Silicon Valley was reeling, collateral damage in the war on terror. And it was only going to get worse.”

The Wall Street Journal: Lawmakers Debate Overhauls to NSA Spying Programs — “The divide Tuesday on Capitol Hill—over just how far changes should go—raises the stakes for President Barack Obama as he prepares a Friday morning speech on his response to a domestic and international furor over disclosures by former NSA contractorEdward Snowden about U.S. surveillance practices. While Mr. Obama isn’t obligated to accept any of his review panel’s recommendations, its report has defined the range of potential changes. Mr. Obama now is in the position of accepting or rejecting each of the recommendations and explaining his decisions to sharply opposed camps.”

National Journal: NSA Unleashed, Obama Tells Public, ‘Trust Me’ — “Nearly six months ago, President Obama sought to temper outrage over the nation’s mushrooming surveillance programs by pledging new steps to balance privacy and safety. ‘It’s not enough for me, as president, to have confidence in these programs,’ he said. ‘The American people need to have confidence in them as well.’ In other words, no government, not even one led by a liberal constitutional lawyer, can shield bad policies with empty promises. It’s not enough to say, ‘Trust us,’ while curbing sacred liberties — and yet that still appears to be Obama’s position.”

January 15 2014

21:49

James Barrat on the future of Artificial Intelligence

James Barrat, author of Our Final Invention: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Human Era, discusses the future of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Barrat takes a look at how to create friendly AI with human characteristics, which other countries are developing AI, and what we could expect with the arrival of the Singularity. He also touches on the evolution of AI and how companies like Google and IBM and government entities like DARPA and the NSA are developing artificial general intelligence devices right now.
15:59

James Barrat on the future of Artificial Intelligence

James Barrat, author of Our Final Invention: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Human Era, discusses the future of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Barrat takes a look at how to create friendly AI with human characteristics, which other countries are developing AI, and what we could expect with the arrival of the Singularity. He also touches on the evolution of AI and how companies like Google and IBM and government entities like DARPA and the NSA are developing artificial general intelligence devices right now.

January 10 2014

17:50

5by5 | Capital #10: Too Easy To Find (Korey Coleman)

Capital Capital is a weekly talk show with Joel Bush and diverse creators exploring direct-to-community entrepreneurship on the web. They discuss news, projects, policy, citizenship, and more. Hosted by Joel Bush. RSS Feed  •  iTunes  •  Sponsor  •  http://5by5.tv/capital/10

January 08 2014

19:44

War On Poverty At 50 Draws Many Eyes

Our Jan. 8 hour marking the 50th Anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s declaration of a ‘War On Poverty’ in America featured a variety of takes on the not-so-ceremonial date remembering the former President’s call to end American poverty in a generation.

LBJ didn’t totally wipe out poverty, of course — the latest figures peg American poverty at roughly 15 percent of the total U.S. population, give or take a few points. And that rate is controversial – Jordan Weissmann in The Atlantic says we’re wrong to even consider the poverty rate as a mark of economic growth and individual wealth in this country. His colleague, Derek Thompson (a regular on our sister program Here & Now) says the 15 percent rate nevertheless shows we haven’t ‘won’ the war on poverty.

Professor Michael Katz of the University of Pennsylvania  offered up this fast and fantastic read on the War on Poverty’s legacy for the Oxford University Press’ blog.

In the U.S. News & World Report, Danielle Kurtzlebeen points out that 15 percent figure probably misses around six million impoverished Americans, a figure getting a wide work out in academic circles. The very concept of “who counts as poor in America” gets a much-needed write-up in the PBS NewsHour Business Desk by Simone Pathe.

For a more numbers-wonkish approach to poverty rates in America, our guest Melissa Boteach’s work as part of a team at the Center for American Progress is as good a read as any for the history and context of the poverty debate today. A companion report by the C.A.P. on economic opportunity and the social safety net is also a fine read.

A Columbia University study on the poverty line, changes in poverty rates and supplemental insurance policies is a dense but fascinating read for any piqued by our conversation on this anniversary day. And a buzzy New York Times piece by sometimes-On Point guests Annie Lowery and Ashley Parker on efforts by national Republican Party leaders to reclaim fighting poverty as a main political issue in this midterm election year caught our eye this morning as we prepared for the broadcast.

Our suggestions are far from exhausting — on big national policy anniversary days like today, the wealth of media coverage can be overwhelming. Instead, we hope our suggestions offer a nice place to start as you read up on the nitty-gritty details of an issue that’s difficult to grasp.

We want your suggestions, too: what did you read or watch or hear today about the War On Poverty that really made sense to you? Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Tumblr and @OnPointRadio.

05:51

The War On Poverty: 50 Years On

Fifty years after America’s declaration of war on poverty, we’ll look at what’s been won, and what lost. Look for new thinking.

President Lyndon B. Johnson visit to Tom Fletcher residence during Poverty Tour of Appalachia (Courtesy LBJ Presidential Family).

President Lyndon B. Johnson visit to Tom Fletcher residence during Poverty Tour of Appalachia (Courtesy LBJ Presidential Family).

Guests

Michael Katz, professor of history, University of Pennsylvania. Author “The Undeserving Poor: America’s Enduring Confrontation.”

Melissa Boteach, director of poverty prosperity program at the Center for American Progress. Coordinates “Half In Ten: The Campaign to Cut Poverty in Half in Ten Years.” (@MBoteach)

Lee Ohanian, professor of economics, University of California Los Angeles. Where he director of the Ettinger Family Program in Macroeconomic Research.

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Alternative Poverty Rate Stuck at 16% — “In September, Census reported the nation’s official poverty rate, which stood unchanged at 15% of the population in 2012—well above the 12.5% level in 2007, before the recession. Some 46.5 million Americans were below the official poverty line of $23,492 for a family of four. On Wednesday, Census reported a more comprehensive measure — one designed to account for anti-poverty programs, regional differences in housing costs and necessary out-of-pocket medical expenses — that showed that 49.7 million people were “poor,” an increase of about 3 million from the official measure. The supplemental poverty rate was 16% in 2012, not significantly different from 16.1% in 2011.”

The Nation: Fifty Years Later, the War on Poverty Must Be Renewed — “But there is a still a long way to go before achieving President Johnson’s stated objective: ‘total victory.’ The tragic misadventure in Vietnam distracted the administration and the country from the one war President Johnson actually did declare, and more recent decades have seen the war on poverty co-opted by the proponents of austerity and turned into an unrelenting war on the poor.”

Washington Post: Paul Ryan’s claim that $15 trillion has been spent on the war on poverty — “The poverty rate is determined by the U.S. Census, and generally such government figures are fairly authoritative. The poverty rate is now about 15 percent, and the last time it was this high was in 1993. Ryan spokesman Conor Sweeney said that was the year that Ryan was referencing when he said ‘in a generation.’ (Okay, a generation is generally defined as 30 years, but 20 may be fine for government work.)”

January 07 2014

12:26

5by5 | Capital #17: Within Reach (Gary Chou)

Gary Chou joins Joel to share stories from his work at the intersection of technology, the arts, and community in places like Austin, San Francisco, and New York. http://5by5.tv/capital/17

January 06 2014

19:53

5by5 | Capital #8: Fidelity of Presence (Brian Brushwood)

Brian joins Joel to discuss the increasing efficiency of the market of ideas as well as his evolving journey as touring magician, web showrunner, podcaster, entrepreneur, husband, father, and more. http://5by5.tv/capital/8
19:52

5by5 | Capital #9: The Diamond Club (Brian Brushwood)

Brian Brushwood (@shwood) on Twitter Shwood.com Shwood's prior appearance on Capital, episode 8 This episode delves into Brian's career path and hopes for the future. Frame Rate a podcast that holds you should be able to watch what you want when you want on whatever device you feel like Kevin Spacey on the future of television Scam School the show dedicated to social engineering at the bar and on the street Weird Things three guys who don't believe in Sasquatch but think he's awesome Don't Trust Andrew Mayne coming soon to A&E BBLiveShow original purpose: podcasting practice the Underpants Gnomes Phase 3: Profit! Wikipedia entry on A Tale of Two Cities "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only." Scam School Book 1 Scam School Book 2 Vook publisher of digital books Night Attack (Live) NSFW Show's chart-topping comedy album Tom Merritt's Lot Beta The Diamond Club Can you tell the difference between Fifty Shades of Gray and The Diamond Club? Wikipedia entry on Naked Came the Stranger a 1969 novel written as a literary hoax poking fun at contemporary American culture. Austin Cable Access reviews for The Diamond Club Spill.com San Diego Comic-Con New York Comic Con Dragon Con The world's largest fantasy/SF convention, held annually in Atlanta, GA, on Labor Day weekend. SXSW Brian speaking at TEDxSanAntonio "Social Engineering -- How to Scam Your Way Into Anything" PAX Penny Arcade Expo: a series of giant gaming festivals held in Seattle, Boston, and Melbourne re attending a TED conference Nerdtacular 2013 Nerdtacular 2013's Kickstarter project The Alamo Drafthouse Wikipedia entry on Ronald Coase Wikipedia entry on transaction costs The Concise Encylcopedia of Economics entry on Ronald Coase Spill Dot Con at RTX 2013 The Spill Movie Community rolling with RTX last summer in Austin RTX Where Gaming Meets The Internet -- a growing festival hosted by Rooster Teeth Productions in Austin every summer Capital episode 5 featuring Burnie Burns Hear the fantastic story of Rooster Teeth Productions. Merchify on-demand made awesome and easy via Amplifier's app for Shopify stores The Regulars a weekly conversation in Austin on Friday mornings at Mozart's. Join anytime. The Big Sort The Hoover Institution counters The Big Sort in the spirit of sharing opposing views... Wikipedia entry on Ideological Turing Test The Right Stuff fact test for your position and an opposing view Monty Python's Flying Circus: The Argument Clinic Tim Kreider in the NYT: "Slaves of the Internet Unite" Techdirt stories tagged "free" Archer Live! It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia's The Nightman Cometh Nearly Impossible an event for people who make and sell physical products. The two-day conference will focus on the stories of how companies have tackled their biggest hurdles and the tools we can all use to make even the biggest challenges seem more possible. The Autumn of the Moguls Monahans Thanks again to Monahans for Capital's theme song. http://5by5.tv/capital/9

January 04 2014

14:00

Torres Strait Islands: Pearlshelling, Treaty, the Sea and Joh - Rear Vision - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

With the announcement of a referendum on the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the constitution, Rear Vision asks: what do we know about the history of the people from the second half of that phrase? How is it that Australia recognises two different groups of Indigenous people? http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/rearvision/torres-strait-islands-pearlshelling-treaty-the-sea/3011426

December 24 2013

00:37

5by5 | Capital #14: As soon as you develop a framework, buy your own domain name. (Shlok Vaidya)

Shlok Vaidya (shloky) on Twitter Shloky.com Hendrix College Shloky.com: Thoughts on New Orleans Social Entrepreneurship Wikipedia entry on Food desert WSJ: Snapchat Spurned $3 Billion Acquisition Offer from Facebook Global Guerrillas Networked tribes, system disruption and the emerging bazaar of violence. A blog about the future of conflict. Say Antything clip on YouTube "I can't work for that corporation." Wikipedia entry on Survivalism Wikipedia entry on Zombie Apocalypse Shloky.com: Origins of the Lean Startup The Lean Startup The Movement That Is Transforming How New Products Are Built And Launched The Sovereign Individual by James Dale Davidson, William Rees-Mogg Mastering the Transition to the Information Age Wikipedia entry on Hernando de Soto Polar The Mystery of Capital by Hernando De Soto Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else The Other Path by Hernando De Soto the economic answer to terrorism Hernando De Soto: Capitalism at Crossroads Illicit by Moises Naim How Smugglers, Traffickers, and Copycats are Hijacking the Global Economy McMafia by Misha Glenny A Journey Through the Global Criminal Underworld Wikipedia entry on John Boyd, military strategist Wikipedia entry on OODA loop HomeFree America Wink: Urban Farm Ordinances in 11/21 Austin City Council Meeting Austin Post: Council Rules on Urban Farms, Bans Animal Slaughter and Compost http://5by5.tv/capital/14

December 23 2013

11:51

A Comeback For Polygamy In Utah?

Polygamy, sister wives, plural families get a boost from a court ruling in Utah. We’ll ask, “What Now?”

Members of the polygamous Brown family of Utah gather for a Christmas gift exchange. A lawsuit the family brought against a Utah statute banning polygamous-style co-habitation was successful in a court ruling in late December. (DCL / TLC)

Members of the polygamous Brown family of Utah gather for a Christmas gift exchange. A lawsuit the family brought against a Utah statute banning polygamous-style co-habitation was successful in a court ruling in late December. (DCL / TLC)

Guests

Jim Dalrymple, reporter covering polygamy for The Salt Lake Tribune. (@jimmycdii)

Jonathan Turley, professor of law at The George Washington School of Law. He represented the polygamous Brown family  from the TLC reality series, “Sister Wives.” (@JonathanTurley)

Ken Klukowski, director of the Center For Religious Liberty at the Family Research Council. Senior legal analyst at Brietbart News. (@kenklukowski)

Kristyn Decker, a former spouse in a polygamous family. Author of “Fifty Years In Polygamy: Big Secrets and Little White Lies.” (@KristynDecker)

From Tom’s Reading List

Los Angeles Times: Polygamy supporters pleased that parts of Utah law are struck down – “Proponents say polygamist cohabitation among fundamentalist Mormons traditionally involves one marriage certificate; any additional wives represent religion-based relationships that are protected under the Constitution. They say the judge’s ruling has preserved laws against bigamy, which involves more than one marriage license. Waddoups ruled that while there was no ‘fundamental right’ to practice polygamy, the central issue was religious cohabitation, and that the language in the Utah law — ‘or cohabits with another person’ — should be struck.”

Salt Lake Tribune: The Utah polygamy ruling: Questions and answers – “In a nutshell, what did the judge say? He said the state could show no public interest in broad language that lumps cohabitation into the category of bigamy and the law was applied unevenly over the decades. Utah used it to prosecute people subscribing to early Mormon teachings and who were public about it rather than investigating anyone it suspected of breaking the statute. This, Waddoups said, amounted to violations of the First and 14th amendments.”

The Daily Beast: Was Rick Santorum Right About Polygamy After All? — “A decade ago, Rick Santorum said polygamy, among other things, would be allowed if bans on sodomy were struck down by the Supreme Court. ‘Sometimes I hate it when what I predict comes true,’ the once and likely future Republican presidential candidate tweeted Sunday after a federal judge decriminalized polygamy in Utah. Judge Clark Waddoups ruled late Friday that parts of the state’s law are unconstitutional, based on a Supreme Court ruling that legalized sodomy across the nation.”

December 20 2013

17:23

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. https://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

December 17 2013

09:33

A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software. http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/
07:22

A Republican Party At Odds With Itself

The fight for the soul of the GOP.  After Speaker Boehner’s tongue-lashing of the Tea Party, a key Main Streeter and a Tea Party stalwart join us to hash out the confrontation on the Right.

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio vehemently rebukes conservative groups who oppose the pending bipartisan budget compromise struck by House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Boehner said the GOP leadership has had enough tea party-driven intransigence in Congress and he doesn’t care what they think.  (AP)

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio vehemently rebukes conservative groups who oppose the pending bipartisan budget compromise struck by House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Boehner said the GOP leadership has had enough tea party-driven intransigence in Congress and he doesn’t care what they think. (AP)

Guests

Michael Needham, CEO of Heritage Action For America. (@MikeNeedham)

Steve LaTourette, President of McDonald Hopkins Government Strategies, a Washington, D.C. lobbying firm. President and CEO of the Republican Main Street Partnership. Former U.S. Congressman from Ohio’s 19th and 14th districts. (@LaTourette)

From Tom’s Reading List

USA Today: Palin to GOP budget supporters: ‘We’ll be watching’ — “Sarah Palin is adding her voice to the chorus of Tea Party conservatives upset with the compromise budget deal. The 2008 GOP vice presidential nominee, who enjoys a following among the small government, anti-tax supporters, blasted the two-year deal worked out by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan and Senate Budget Chairwoman Patty Murray. Palin argued in an op-ed column for Breitbart.com that the budget agreement would lead to higher taxes and more spending.”

Washington Times:  Budget Deal: The GOP is playing the long game – “A big, messy, budget battle right now would do nothing to help the GOP politically. While the Tea Party will undoubtedly call bad form, and while acceptance of this budget by no means constitutes the act of practicing fiscal conservatism in Congressional politics, it does give the Democrats one less thing they can use to distract from the fact that President Obama’s single greatest legislative achievement has been marred by ‘faulty’ websites, lies, fraud, and downright resentment among the American people.”

Politico: Boehner, Ryan lobby Senate GOP on budget plan — “Speaker John Boehner and Rep. Paul Ryan convinced 167 House Republicans to back the bipartisan budget deal last week and effectively put an end to this year’s fiscal wars. Now, they’re trying to get at least five Senate Republicans to do the same. In an attempt to head off growing Senate GOP opposition to the plan, Boehner and Ryan have personally urged a handful of Senate Republicans to help advance the plan, according to several people familiar with the matter. Boehner has brought the issue up in conversations with some of his closest Senate GOP friends, sources say, while Ryan has actively made calls to wayward Senate Republicans.

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