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February 21 2014

09:00

February 14 2014

08:11

Week In The News: Snowy South, Debt Ceiling, Michael Sam

Sochi medals. A debt-ceiling deal. Monsieur Hollande in Washington. Snowmageddon  in the South. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Cars are left abandoned along Franklin Street after a winter storm left poor conditions in Chapel Hill, N.C., Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning lasting into Thursday covering 95 of the state's 100 counties. (AP)

Cars are left abandoned along Franklin Street after a winter storm left poor conditions in Chapel Hill, N.C., Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning lasting into Thursday covering 95 of the state’s 100 counties. (AP)

Guests

Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent for CBS News. Correspondent-at-Large for National Journal. (@MajorCBS)

Laure Mandeville, U.S. bureau chief and chief White House correspondent for Le Figaro. (@lauremandeville)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: The Four Most Notable Nuggets From ‘The Hillary Papers’ – “Republicans are seizing Monday on a report published Sunday titled “The Hillary Papers.” The lengthy piece from the Washington Free Beacon, a conservative news Web site, details personal documents from one of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s closest friends, Diane Blair, a political science professor who died in 2000.”

CNN: The Southern snow was round one; here comes ice, the heavyweight –” The snow was here, two weeks ago. With just a smattering of white, it wreaked havoc on the South. But it may have been just an opening round. Now, an ice storm is hitting. And matched with snow, it’s the heavyweight of the two. Weather mavens expect up to an inch of ice will give broad swaths of the South a good shellacking. An inch doesn’t sound impressive? A foot of snow may look big and bad, but it’s a bunch of fluff compared to a solid inch of ice.”

Politico: Obamacare finally clears the tower – ”The new report is good enough that it might reset Washington’s expectations: maybe Obamacare isn’t going to be a train wreck after all. Maybe it’ll be more like one of those Metro trains that runs kind of slowly, and sometimes stops in the middle of the tracks for no apparent reason, but eventually gets you where you need to go.”

February 07 2014

07:41

The World According To Carl Hiaasen

Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen joins us on Florida life and politics, from Marco Rubio to Trayvon Martin.

Justin Bieber appears in court via video feed, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in Miami. Bieber was released from jail Thursday following his arrest on charges of driving under the influence, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Police say they stopped the 19-year-old pop star while he was drag-racing down a Miami Beach street before dawn. (AP)

Justin Bieber appears in court via video feed, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in Miami. Bieber was released from jail Thursday following his arrest on charges of driving under the influence, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Police say they stopped the 19-year-old pop star while he was drag-racing down a Miami Beach street before dawn. (AP)

Guest

Carl Hiaasen, best-selling novelist and award-winning columnist for The Miami Herald. His new collection of columns is “Dance of the Reptiles: Rampaging Tourists, Marauding Pythons, Larcenous Legislators, Crazed Celebrities, and Tar-Balled Beaches.”

From Tom’s Reading List

Miami Herald: The story A-Rod would love to tell — “As I’ve said all along, I’m totally innocent. I don’t use performance-enhancing drugs, period. And I would never, ever put a strange-looking lozenge under my tongue before a big game. Anybody who knows me will tell you that I’m terrified of lozenges.

Los Angeles Times: Speaker John Boehner tells Leno he favors Jeb Bush in 2016 — “Asked what he thought of the upcoming presidential race in 2016, Boehner said, ‘I’m not endorsing anybody. But Jeb Bush is my friend and, frankly, I think he’d make a great president.’”

National Review: We Need School Choice Now – ”Choice is bringing long-overdue innovation into an antiquated education model, particularly with digital technology. There are blended-learning schools, which mix computer labs with traditional classroom time. There are virtual classes and full-time virtual schools that give all students, no matter their addresses, access to quality curriculum and teachers. Home educators have endless options in selecting high-quality online courses.”

Read An Excerpt Of “Dance of the Reptiles” By Carl Hiaasen

February 04 2014

08:41

‘Tiger Mom’ Talks Culture And Success In America

“Tiger Mom” Amy Chua and her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, back, this time with her take – an explosive look — at what makes some ethnic and cultural groups successful in America.

Amy Chua and her husband, Jed Rubenfeld are both professors of law at Yale University Law School. They are also the authors of

Amy Chua and her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, are both professors of law at Yale University Law School. They are also the authors of “The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America.” (Penguin Press)

Guests

Amy Chua, co-author of “The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups In America.” Also author of “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.” Professor of law at Yale Law School. (@amychua)

Jed Rubenfeld, co-author of “The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups In America.” Also author of “Freedom and Time“ and “Revolution by Judiciary: The Structure of American Constitutional Law.”

Richard Alba, professor of sociology at the Graduate Center at City University of New York. Author of “Ethnic Identity: The Transformation of White America” and “Remaking the American Mainstream Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration.”

From Tom’s Reading List

TIME: The ‘Tiger Mom’ Superiority Complex – “A new strain of racial, ethnic and cultural reductivism has crept into the American psyche and public discourse. Whereas making sweeping observations about, say, African-American or Hispanic culture–flattering or unflattering–remains unthinkable in polite company, it has become relatively normal in the past 10 years to comment on the supposed cultural superiority of various ‘model minorities.’ I call it the new racism–and I take it rather personally.”

New York Times Magazine: Confessions of a Tiger Couple — “The book is a work of Gladwellian sociology that enters the same cultural minefield as ‘Battle Hymn.’ Looking at minorities like Mormons, Nigerian immigrants, Asian-Americans and Jews, among others, Chua and Rubenfeld contend that successful groups share three traits: a superiority complex, feelings of insecurity and impulse control. America, they conclude, used to be a ‘triple-package culture’ before it succumbed to ‘instant-gratification disorder.”

The Jewish Week: Good And Bad News On Jewish Push For Success – “While anyone can possess these traits, their research suggests that some groups are instilling them more frequently than others and with greater success: every one of America’s most successful groups believes that there is something exceptional about their group; being an outsider has been a source of insecurity evident in all of America’s most successful rising groups; and contemporary American parenting is focused on ‘feeling good and living in the moment,’ while every one of America’s most successful rising groups has inculcated disciplined habits into their children. ”

Read An Excerpt Of “The Triple Package” By Amy Chua And Jed Rubenfeld

January 30 2014

21:36

A Conservative Case For A Higher Minimum Wage

Our Jan. 28 hour on economic mobility and the current state of ‘The American Dream’ featured a fascinating closing segment on an unusual campaign for a higher minimum wage in California.

Ron Unz (AP)

Ron Unz (AP)

The advocate? Conservative millionaire Ron Unz, chairman of the Higher Wages Alliance and part of a growing number of figures on the right side of the political spectrum asking for a higher minimum wage. Unz is advocating for a state wage as high as $12 an hour in the Golden State. He was joined on our air by Mercatus Center economist Tyler Cowen, who thinks a higher minimum wage is a step in the wrong direction.

TOM ASHBROOK: President Obama will announce tonight that he is ordering the minimum wage for federal contracting to be raised from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour. There’s a push on in Congress to raise the minimum wage for all Americans to $10.10 an hour. A millioniare conservative in California, Ron Unz, is pushing a state ballot measure for a $12 minimum wage in California. Unz says it’s time to stop allowing big companies to pay so little that the government has to step in with services to support the working poor. What do you think? Does a conservative argument for a higher minimum wage make sense to you?

Ron Unz joins me now from Stanford, California. He’s chairman of the Higher Wages Alliance. Ron Unz, welcome to On Point. Thanks very much for being here.

RON UNZ: Great to be here.

TA: We’ve heard you make the case, but make it for us right now: why a $12 minimum wage for California?

RU: Well The situation right now is that so many tens of millions of low-wage workers in the United States can’t get by on their own paychecks. Therefore, they receive vast numbers of dollars form the taxpayers andthe government. The total around the country is $250 billion a year in social welfare spending going to the working poor. If the working poor were paid a reasonable wage by their employer, they would no longer be eligible for many of those programs, and the taxpayers would save tens of billions of dollars a year. What we have right now is a system where many of these businesses have privatized the benefits of their workers, they get the work, and socialized the cost and shifted the expense to the rest of society and to the taxpayers, and I don’t think that makes sense.

TA: How are your fellow conservatives responding to your idea of a $12 minimum wage in California?

RU: Surprisingly open to the idea. I mean the minimum wage is an issue that really dropped off the American radar screen 10, 20, 30 years ago. It hasn’t been one of these hot-button ideological issues. The main concerns conservatives have is whether a higher minimum wage would cause massive job less. The evidence is that it wouldn’t, very few workers would lose their jobs, their in the non-tradeable service sectors. All that would happen would be that the extra costs would be passed along to the consumer. And the price rises would be very small. Wal-Mart could cover a $12 minimum wage by raising their prices one percent, one time.

TA: Onepercent, one time, at Wal-Mart and just keep it there, on out, and that would cover all this? If you had a 12 minimum wage in California what would that mean if you had a two income family — where would it put their annual earnings?

RU: It would be a life changing difference. A single worker, at $12 a hour minimum wage, would make $25,000 a year. A couple would make $50,000 a year. $50,000 a year doesn’t make you affluent, it doesn’t make you rich, but you can generally get by on something like that. And the tax-payers would save tens of billions of dollars each year nationwide if something like that were generally adopted.

TA: There’s the argument from millionaire Ron Unz. He’s former publisher for the American Conservative, he’s saying higher minimum wage for California, $12 an hour.

January 27 2014

16:00

Texas ‘Right-To-Die’ Drama

Life, death, mother, fetus and the state of Texas.

Erick Muñoz's wife, Marlise, is said to be brain dead. The Fort Worth, Tx. hospital where Marlise is under observation will not permit her family to remove the pregnant woman from life support until her child is born. (AP)

Erick Muñoz’s wife, Marlise, is said to be brain dead. The Fort Worth, Tx. hospital where Marlise is under observation will not permit her family to remove the pregnant woman from life support until her child is born. (AP)

The story of Marlise Muñoz lying brain dead and pregnant in Texas, kept alive by machines for a damaged fetus, sounds ghoulish enough for Edgar Allen Poe.  Her body decomposing in a hospital bed.  The life within deeply damaged.  Her family begging she be let go.  The hospital citing Texas law and saying no for long weeks.  On Friday, a Texas judge said enough.  No more life support.  The remains of Marlise Muñoz have been released to her family.  But the story of what happened in that hospital in Texas is still stirring controversy.  This hour On Point:  a woman and a fetus, life and death, and the law in Texas.

– Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Diane Jennings, reporter for The Dallas Morning News. (@djennings)

Tom MayoAltshuler University Distinguished Teaching Professor and associate professor of law at Southern Methodist University. (@tangowhiskymike)

Joe Pojman, executive director, Texas Alliance For Life (@joepojman)

Andrea Grimes, senior political reporter at RH Reality Check. (@andreagrimes)

Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate. Contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine. Fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School. (@emilybazelon)

From Tom’s Reading List

Dallas Morning News: Fight to take pregnant Tarrant woman off life support goes to judge Friday — “In court documents, Erick Muñoz said that doctors told him his wife was brain-dead and that he asked that she not be kept on life support. Both husband and wife had worked as paramedics and knew of each other’s end-of-life wishes, court filings say. Marlise Muñoz’s parents agreed with their son-in-law’s request. But officials at John Peter Smith refused to turn off life-support equipment, citing Texas law prohibiting removal if a patient is pregnant.”

ABC News: Why Texas Fetus Might Have Had ‘Abnormalities’ Before Mother Was Brain Dead — “The family of Marlise Munoz, a 33-year-old paramedic who was 14 weeks pregnant when a suspected pulmonary embolism left her brain dead two months ago, is suing John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth because doctors there told the family a Texas law forbade it from withdrawing life support until the fetus’s birth or a miscarriage occurs. The fetus has hydrocephalus, or water on the brain, a possible heart condition, and ‘lower extremities that deformed to the extent that the gender cannot be determined,’ lawyers representing Munoz’s husband announced Wednesday evening.”

Slate: Brain-Dead Marlise Munoz’s Fetus Is ‘Distinctly Abnormal.’ Please, Texas, Let This Nightmare End — “How can the state supersede the wishes of Erick in this scenario? The answer is that it can’t. Hospitals cannot provide ‘life-sustaining treatment’ to a person who is dead, and that’s what brain dead means: death. This is not the same as being in a vegetative state, where you can breathe without a respirator. In all 50 states, brain dead means you are legally dead.”

January 21 2014

09:50

Who’s Afraid Of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street’

“The Wolf of Wall Street” is making waves well beyond its Academy Award nominations. We’ll catch the controversy.

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the Martin Scorese film,

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the new Martin Scorsese film, “The Wolf Of Wall Street.” (Paramount Pictures)

Guests

David Edelstein, chief film critic for New York Magazine. Film critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air” and CBS’ “This Morning.”

Issac Chotiner, senior editor at The New Republic. (@IChotiner)

Joel Cohen, prosecutor with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

Sam Polk, founder and executive director of Groceryships. Former Wall Street trader. (@SamPolk)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wrap: War Over ‘Wolf of Wall Street’: Scorsese’s Latest Ignites Online Brouhaha — “The donnybrook that has emerged online, however, covers much broader ground: Is Scorsese, some viewers ask, satirizing the outrageous behavior he’s portraying onscreen, or is he celebrating it? Belfort, after all, gets off (spoiler alert) with a slap on the wrist for his crimes, and the film never takes a pronounced stance regarding Belfort and his colleagues bilking their clients out of millions of dollars.”

L.A. Weekly: An Open Letter to the Makers of The Wolf of Wall Street, and the Wolf Himself — “As an 18-year-old, I had no idea what was going on. But then again, did anyone? Certainly your investors didn’t – and they were left holding the bag when you cashed out your holdings and got rich off their money. So Marty and Leo, while you glide through press junkets and look forward to awards season, let me tell you the truth – what happened to my mother, my two sisters and me.”

New York Times: For the Love of Money –”I wanted a billion dollars. It’s staggering to think that in the course of five years, I’d gone from being thrilled at my first bonus — $40,000 — to being disappointed when, my second year at the hedge fund, I was paid ‘only’ $1.5 million.”

January 20 2014

07:10

Fox, MSNBC And The Roger Ailes Story

Gabriel Sherman on Fox News mastermind Roger Ailes and our polarized American media, from Fox to MSNBC.

In this Sept. 29, 2006 file photo, Fox News CEO Roger Ailes poses at Fox News in New York. Propelled by Ailes'

In this Sept. 29, 2006 file photo, Fox News CEO Roger Ailes poses at Fox News in New York. Propelled by Ailes’ “fair and balanced” branding, Fox has targeted viewers who believe the other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, display a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivers them with unvarnished truth. (AP)

Guests

Gabriel Sherman, contributing editor at New York Magazine. Author of “The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News — And Divided A Country.” (@gabrielsherman)

Kalefa Sanneh, staff writer for the New Yorker.

Bryan Monroe, editor at CNNPolitics.com (@BryanMonroeCNN)

From Tom’s Reading List

The New Republic: Roger Ailes Is Not That Powerful — “It is to Sherman’s credit that he both elicits sympathy for Ailes, and quickly dispels any hope that Ailes’s story is an uplifting one. This book is not about overcoming one’s odds, and rising above pettiness. No, pretty soon young Roger is off working for The Mike Douglas Show and then Richard Nixon, who had a similarly rough upbringing, and who happened to have all the qualities that Ailes would eventually develop: pettiness, self-pity, and paranoia.”

Slate: The Troublemaker — “Sherman’s story is most vivid when it quotes Ailes himself. But, in a fairly underhanded way, only at the end does Sherman reveal that Ailes refused to talk to him. The book is, in effect, a compilation of Ailes’ memorable public barbs and bon mots. These are often presented as direct quotes, creating a puzzling effect: You want more, but the author, with only his Ailes bits and bobs, can’t give it.”

The New Yorker: Twenty Four Hour Party People – “The decisions that Maddow makes go a long way toward defining what MSNBC is, too. Phil Griffin, the president, calls Maddow “our quarterback,” the person who sets the tone for the network. A few years ago, MSNBC had a different quarterback: Keith Olbermann, a former ESPN anchor who rose to fame during the Bush years, delivering urbane, fuguelike denunciations of a President who was sometimes known, on his show, as “you, sir.” Olbermann and MSNBC agreed to a no-fault divorce in early 2011, and Griffin has spent the past two and a half years reinventing the network in Maddow’s image. At almost any time of the day, you can turn it on and encounter someone whose liberalism is earnest, upbeat, and perhaps a little wonky.”

Read An Excerpt Of “The Loudest Voice In The Room” By Gabriel Sherman

January 15 2014

05:11

Chris Christie’s Future With The G.O.P.

The fate of Chris Christie in the shadow of “Bridgegate.” Top GOP strategists and political reporters join us.

Governor Chris Christie talks to a reporter following a visit to Fort Lee Borough Hall Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, in Fort Lee, N.J. to apologize to Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich about the governor's staff allegedly closing lanes to the George Washington Bridge last September. (AP)

Governor Chris Christie talks to a reporter following a visit to Fort Lee Borough Hall Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014, in Fort Lee, N.J. to apologize to Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich about the governor’s staff allegedly closing lanes to the George Washington Bridge last September. (AP)

Guests

Matt Katz, WNYC / New Jersey Public Radio reporter. Former political reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer. (@MattKatz00)

McKay Coppins, senior writer for BuzzFeed. (@McKayCoppins)

Keith Appell, senior vice president at CRC Public Relations, longtime G.O.P. political strategist. (@KeithCRC)

Steve Deace, host of the nationally-syndicatedSteve Deace Show, based in Iowa. (@SteveDeaceShow)

From Tom’s Reading List

Bergen Record: GWB probe targets Christie’s office; renewal of subpoena power expected — “The George Washington Bridge lane-closure investigation could reach into Governor Christie’s office as early as Monday when a new round of subpoenas is expected to land on the desks of key members of Christie’s inner circle, a Democratic legislator leading the probe said on Saturday. Assemblyman John Wisniewski said he plans to issue subpoenas demanding documents from the governor’s former deputy chief of staff Bridget Anne Kelly and spokesman Michael Drewniak, along with other aides whose names surfaced last week in documents related to the lane closures in early September.”

NPR:  Beyond The Bridge, Christie Faces Questions About Sandy Funds — “There’s good news and bad news in the poll. A third of New Jerseyans think that Christie himself was involved in the decision to close the toll lanes, which caused the traffic jam – it’s only a third. But two-thirds do not accept the governor’s timeline about when he found out about the political retribution involved in this traffic scandal. And so there’s some mixed numbers here. It’s a great for the governor but it certainly could be worse.”

BuzzFeed: Why Conservatives Aren’t Rushing To Chris Christie’s Defense – “Christie has been at odds with his party’s right wing ever since the final days of the 2012 campaign, when many on the right believe he abandoned his efforts to elect Mitt Romney in pursuit of his own image as a champion of bipartisanship — embracing President Obama, often literally, in a series of widely publicized photos and interviews in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. He went on to stake out decidedly centrist positions on a number of issues during his reelection campaign, and when he won in a landslide, he lectured the rest of the GOP about why they should follow his lead.”

 

November 22 2013

05:22

Week In The News: Afghan Deals, Midwest Storms, J.P. Morgan Fine

Midwest destruction, Afghan troop talks, a big fine for J.P. Morgan and gay marriage and the Cheney sisters. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Trudy Rubin, Worldview columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer. (@TrudyRubin)

Bill McKenzie, editorial columnist for The Dallas Morning News. (@Bill_McKenzie)

Jack BeattyOn Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

The Philadelphia Inquirer: Bluster from Congress on Iran, but to what end? – “I can understand Netanyahu’s thinking: He distrusts Tehran and wants President Obama to back an Israeli military strike on its nuclear sites. But I can’t grasp the ‘thinking’ in Congress. Are the sanctions hawks really ready to push America into another unnecessary Mideast war? The hawks argue that if strong economic curbs pushed the Iranians into talks, then harsher punishment will make them give up their nuclear program. But when it comes to Iran, that kind of strategy has failed badly in the past.

The Dallas Morning News:  A second president’s profile in courage — “Johnson’s reaction went beyond an ability to handle emergencies; I think another factor was in play. He was absolutely comfortable using his authority to achieve his goals. That trait separates political leaders from those who follow in their wake. Johnson’s indomitable will certainly helped him prepare to lead from the moment he arrived at Andrews. The late George Plimpton described some leaders as having an X factor that defines them and puts them in a special category. For some, that could be charisma, which Kennedy had in large doses. But Johnson’s ability to tower over others was his X factor. He used it often as Senate majority leader in the 1950s to move legislation. And, of course, he put it to use in carrying out JFK’s domestic legacy.”

Politico: Liz Cheney tries to repair hostile relations with Wyoming press — “The question is whether she can undo the initial damage in a state with such a strong newspaper tradition. The primary contest is nine months away, but political pros say Cheney faces a steep uphill climb against the incumbent, Sen. Mike Enzi. Cheney was widely seen as a carpetbagger from the moment she entered the race — she moved her family to the state last year — and the attacks on the state’s newspapers, which have a loyal readership, have left a sour taste.”

October 23 2013

04:40

Jezebel Founder Anna Holmes And Modern Women’s Media

The founding editor of the hugely popular online women’s news and culture magazine, Jezebel, shares her scrappy, brawling, feminist view of the world.

Guest

Anna Holmes, founding editor of Jezebel.com, the online women’s news and culture magazine. Author of “The Book of Jezebel: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Lady Things” and “Hell Hath No Fury: Women’s Letters From The End of the Affair.” Columnist at the New York Times Book Review.

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times Book Review: What’s The Most Erotic Book Review You’ve Ever Read? – “It’s about first love, but it’s also about sex: Katherine has a close, functional family, an interest in tennis and a carnal curiosity that eventually finds expression in her relationship with Michael, to whom she loses her virginity. Although not particularly graphic in its depiction of intercourse — readers remember the corny name bestowed on Michael’s reproductive organs better than the sex itself — the book, which has sold more than 3.5 million copies, remains, for better or worse, one of the most memorably erotic novels I’ve ever encountered.”

Mother Jones: How Jezebel Smashes the Patriarchy, Click by Click – “ It was part of my mission to call out women’s magazines for the way images are manipulated. When we held a contest for the most egregious examples, I was sent an image of Faith Hill on the cover of Redbook before it had been retouched, and we showed the before and after. It made national news. Now some women’s mags are very vocal about how they don’t use Photoshop like that anymore. I think that’s an indirect result of the stink that we made for many years.”

NPR: If You’re Looking To Read ‘Lady Things,’ Choose Jezebel Over Jones – “If you’re looking for jolly feminist cultural commentary, giveMad About the Boy a pass and, instead, pick up The Book of Jezebel. This is a lavish encyclopedia composed of contributions from the writers and artists who’ve helped shape the Jezebel website, which was created in 2007 by award-winning writer, Anna Holmes. The Book of Jezebel is packed with gorgeous graphics and photos, as well as witty and unruly entries on everything from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House on the Prairie” books to speculums. Most gloriously, this is an encyclopedia with a voice.”

Read An Excerpt of The Book of Jezebel: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Lady Things” by Anna Holmes

October 14 2013

14:00

Debt Limit, Continuing Resolutions And DC Dealmaking

The push for a deal on debt, debt-ceiling, default, shutdown. We’ll parse the state of play with top reporters.

In three days, the U.S. government will not have enough money to pay its bills.   First time in the nation’s history.  Democrats and Republicans are talking.  Both sides say they are trying. Really, really trying.  But so far, no deal.  Patience is waning. The American people are fed up.  A new poll shows 60 percent want to fire all the politicians. Time to clear the decks. The world’s watching, too.  The International Monetary Fund’s Christine Lagarde warns American lawmakers they risk tipping the world into global recession. Up next On Point:  the clock ticks toward default.

– Jane Clayson

Guests

Charles Babington, Covers Politics and Congress for the Associated Press. (@CBabington)

Susan Davis, Congressional Correspondent for USA Today. (@DaviSusan)

Michael Hirsh, Chief Correspondent for National Journal. (@MichaelPHirsh)

From The Reading List

USA Today: Senate takes control of budget, shutdown talks — “Senate Democratic leaders met Saturday afternoon at the White House with President Obama to plot strategy going forward. After the 75-minute meeting, neither the president nor the senators had any comment. The momentum shifted to the Senate as it became increasingly clear that House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, was unable to strike a deal with Obama on his own. Following a closed-door House GOP meeting Saturday morning, lawmakers acknowledged a diminished role to resolve the impasse.”

AP: Reid: Soft-spoken, combative Obama partner vs. GOP — “Harry Reid, the soft-spoken but pugilistic Senate majority leader, didn’t wait for White House officials to declare their view of high-stakes talks over the government shutdown and debt. Standing just outside the West Wing, the 73-year-old Nevadan gave reporters his assessment of a key House Republican offer last week: ‘Not going to happen.’ That blunt defiance caught administration officials off guard and contrasted with their vague statements later about the GOP’s bid to extend the nation’s borrowing powers for six weeks without fully reopening the government.”

National Journal: Who, Exactly, Just Blinked in the Debt-Ceiling Showdown? – “If you’re wondering who just blinked first in the tense back-and-forth between Democrats and Republicans over the government shutdown and debt-ceiling deadline, the answer is: It’s a photo finish. In fact, both Speaker John Boehner and President Obama are blinking—that is, giving up ground—at nearly the same time. Picking up on hints from Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Wednesday that the president was open to a short-term debt-ceiling increase, Boehner and the House Republican leadership obliged him. On Thursday morning, they came out of a meeting to announce they’d support “clean” legislation of the sort Obama wanted to raise the debt limit—but only for the next six weeks. Then, during that period, Boehner and his team said, the president needs to sit down and talk about concrete spending cuts and other issues.”

August 21 2013

13:29

F1B Downshift: Steve Matchett on 2014 regulations | Formula 1 Blog

July 22 2013

14:00

Race In America Today

The president, the country, and race after Trayvon Martin

The country’s first black president has not made a big deal, regularly, about race. In office, his most important statement on the subject has arguably been just being there, the nation’s leader, African-American, with his strong African-American family at his side.

But on Friday, President Obama spoke directly, personally, to race in the aftermath of the George Zimmerman verdict in the killing of Trayvon Martin. That, said the President of the United States, “could have been me 35 years ago.” Let’s think again, he said. Deeper.

This hour, On Point: the president, the country, and race, after Trayvon Martin.

- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Touré, writer and cultural critic. Co-host of MSNBC’s The Cycle.

Laura Washington, columnist at the Chicago Sun Times.

Bryan Monroe, editor of CNNPolitics.com.

From Tom’s Reading List

TIME: Stopping the Slaughter – Every death is a tragedy in this nation, whether in Pennsylvania, Connecticut or Florida. We all have suffered a great tragedy with the death of Trayvon Martin. But Trayvon’s story is only the latest in our epidemic of violence, compounded by race, that must be addressed in America.

New York Times: President Offers a Personal Take on Race in U.S. – After days of angry protests and mounting public pressure, President Obama summoned five of his closest advisers to the Oval Office on Thursday evening. It was time, he told them, for him to speak to the nation about the Trayvon Martin verdict, and he had a pretty good idea what he wanted to say.

National Journal: President Obama’s Other Major Speech on Race in America — In March, 2008, Senator Barack Obama was under fire. Video of the senator’s former pastor and supposed “spiritual mentor” Reverend Jeremiah Wright making a series of racially controversial statements was making the rounds, and threatening to derail his presidential campaign. So the senator decided to give a speech in Philadelphia about race in the United States. It proved to be one of the most memorable moments of not just 2008, but of Obama’s political career.

March 30 2013

15:54

F1B Downshift: EXCLUSIVE interview with Steve Matchett | Formula 1 Blog

May 12 2011

17:26

Economists and Democracy by Dani Rodrik - Project Syndicate

Raised on textbooks that obscure the role of institutions, economists often imagine that markets arise on their own, with no help from purposeful, collective action. And, once we recognize that markets require rules, we must next ask who writes those rules. http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/rodrik56/English

April 19 2011

20:46

Cynical Brit — 'Entitled Gamers'

December 05 2010

19:13
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