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February 07 2014

13:32

Chris Masters On Being A Journalist - Culture and Society - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

At the beginning of this week, veteran journalist Chris Masters filed his final story for Four Corners, the ABC current affairs programme he's worked on for 25 years. http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2008/11/21/2424859.htm

February 01 2014

22:27

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit Show: The Happiness Project - Welcome to My Blue Zone|A-Infos Radio Project

Had a chance to hear Dan Buettner speak at The Richmond Forum this past Saturday night. Buettner is known for his work studying longevity and has developed the concept of Blue Zones - areas of the world where humans live longer than the rst of us. A corollary to his work on longevity is his study of happiness and his analytical approach to measuring happiness. Great program and tonight's show is inspired by his work unlocking the secrets of happiness. I promise that you'll be happier in two hours than you are right now, if you listen to tonight's show. Come on get happy! The Haberdasher Read more on Buettner's work: http://www.bluezones.com/live-happier/ Come On Get Happy The Partridge Family Come On Get Happy! The Very Best of The Partridge Family Happiness Allen Toussaint The Allen Toussaint Collection Happiness Is A Warm Gun Breeders Pod Happiness Black Uhuru Black Uhuru: Liberation the Island Anthology Happiness - You're A Good Man Charlie Brown Bob Balaban and Company Broadway 1959 - 1967 - Put On A Happy Face Happy Loving Couples Joe Jackson Look Sharp! Love and Happiness Al Green Take Me To The River Get Happy Clifford Brown Clifford Brown: Complete Blue Note Pacific Jazz Feeling Happy Big Joe Turner Big Joe Turner's Greatest Hits My Happiness Forever LaVern Baker Soul On Fire: The Best of LaVern Baker Don't Worry, Be Happy Bobby McFerrin Simple Pleasures Happy Together Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention Fillmore East, 1971 What Makes You Happy Liz Phair whitechocolatespacegg Happy Woman Blues Lucinda Williams Happy Woman Blues Stranger To My Happiness Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings Give The People What They Want Get Happy Judy Garland Best of Broadway - Early 50s We're A Happy Family The Ramones Rocket To Russia The Happy Song (Dum-Dum) Otis Redding The Complete Stax-Volt Singles 1959 - 1968 I'm So Happy Now Willie Wright Telling The Truth Hello Sadness Lucero The Attic Tapes Sad and Lonely Lucero That Much Further West Smile Jimmy Durante As Time Goes By: The Best of Jimmy Durante Smile A Little Smile For Me Flying Machine Classic Rock: Bubblegum, Garage and Pop Nuggets The Smile you Smile Van Morrison Bang Masters I've Been Everywhere Johnny Cash The Legend of Johnny Cash Cities Talking Heads Fear if Music National Health The Kinks One For the Road Money Won't Change You James Brown Star Time No Kids Marvin Pontiac The Legendary Marvin Pontiac Work Scott H. Biram Graveyard Shift Friends Cracker Sunrise in The Land of Milk and Honey

January 31 2014

09:38

IQ2 debate: The Media Can’t Be Trusted to Tell the Truth - Culture and Society - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

Freedom of the press is held up as one of the most fundamental values of a functioning Western Democracy. http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2009/08/05/2647061.htm
08:41

Four Hundred Years Of American Football

The deep history of American Football. Ahead of Superbowl XLVIII, 400 years of pain and glory.

Denver Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker (83) catches a pass during practice Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Florham Park, N.J. The Broncos are scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game Sunday, Feb. 2, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP)

Denver Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker (83) catches a pass during practice Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Florham Park, N.J. The Broncos are scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game Sunday, Feb. 2, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP)

Guests

Susan Reyburn, writer and editor for the Library of Congress. Author of “Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America’s Game.” Also co-author of “Baseball Americana,” “The Library of Congress World War II Companion” and author of “Women Who Dare: Amelia Earthart.”

Greg Easterbrook, contributing editor at The Atlantic Monthly and The Washington Monthly, author of the Tuesday Morning Quarterback column for ESPN.com. Author of “The King Of Sports: Football’s Impact on America” and “Tuesday Morning Quarterback.” (@easterbrookg)

Armen Keteyian, CBS News correspondent and lead correspondent for Showtime’s “60 Minutes Sports.” Co-author of ”The System: The Glory and Scandal of Big-Time College Football.” (@armenketeyian)

From Tom’s Reading List

ESPN: Unionization may fail but not a failure — “To succeed in the formation of a union, the players must convince the National Labor Relations Board that they are employees. It will not be easy. In addition to the numerous courts that have ruled that injured athletes are not eligible for medical benefits automatically available to employees, the players will face assertions from Northwestern and the NCAA that they are ‘student-athletes,’ a category invented to avoid any suggestion of employment.”

Wall Street Journal: 11 Minutes Of Action — “In other words, if you tally up everything that happens between the time the ball is snapped and the play is whistled dead by the officials, there’s barely enough time to prepare a hard-boiled egg. In fact, the average telecast devotes 56% more time to showing replays. ”

International Business Times: Bonuses, Trademark Rights And Brand Value: What’s Really At Stake For The Players And The NFL?  – “The Super Bowl is nothing if not a game of superlatives. It’s often the most-watched television broadcast in any given year. It generates more tweets and it commands higher ad revenue than any other sporting event in the world. Calculating the average revenue from sponsorships, tickets and licensed merchandise, Forbes magazine in 2012 estimated the Super Bowl brand to be worth $470 million; no other game comes close.”

Read An Excerpt From “Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America’s Game” by Susan Reyburn

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January 30 2014

10:42

Life, Wisdom And ‘Middlemarch’

Life, love and “Middlemarch.” Rebecca Mead on why she can’t stop reading George Eliot’s great Victorian novel.

A portrait of the British novelist George Eliot at age 30, by Alexandre-Louis-François d'Albert-Durade. (Creative Commons)

A portrait of the British novelist George Eliot at age 30, by Alexandre-Louis-François d’Albert-Durade. (Creative Commons)

Guest

Rebecca Mead, staff writer at The New Yorker. Author of “My Life in Middlemarch” and  ”One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding.” (@Rebeccamead_NYC)

From Tom’s Reading List

Boston Globe: ‘My Life In Middlemarch’ By Rebecca Mead — “Mead illustrates how the reversal of the 19th-century marriage plot for which ‘Middlemarch’’ is famous is inextricably linked to Eliot’s personal experience of a long lasting, committed union as a state of happiness that far outpaced the seemingly all-consuming tribulations of young love. This state of equal partnership is mirrored in Mead’s life, and it’s no wonder that this ‘home epic’ speaks to her and has continued to appeal to generations of readers, regardless of gender.”

Salon: How great books shape us — “There’s a lot more going on in ‘Middlemarch’ than that, but the two bad marriages are what you notice if, like Mead, you’re a brainy young woman who wants to make something of herself and whose knowledge of life comes mostly from books. Eliot herself — born Mary Ann Evans, the daughter of a Midlands estate manager — was once just such a girl, and many readers first encounter ‘Middlemarch’ when they’re making the same sort of life decisions that confront Dorothea and Lydgate. ‘My Life in Middlemarch’ follows both Eliot and Mead as they obtain their educations and take their hard knocks from the world, while Mead explores which parts of Eliot’s life and social circle may have inspired parts of the novel.”

The New Yorker: George Eliot’s Superfan — “As I read Main’s copious correspondence I found myself alternately appalled and moved by the glimpses it offered into the life of this sad, shadowy man. There was something alarming, almost stalker-like, in his attentions. Over and over again he wrote Eliot long, effusive letters, then followed up with a demand for reassurance that his effusion had not given offense, then offered apologies for his neediness. On one occasion he told her, ‘I should like to see you in your home, but I think I should myself choose to be unseen the while—if that could be. I could not be disappointed in you, but you might easily be disappointed in me.’”

Read An Excerpt Of “My Life In Middlemarch” By Rebecca Mead

January 29 2014

06:42

‘Looking’ At Gay Life Now

We take a look at the new HBO series “Looking,” and its take on gay life now.

In HBO's new series, 'Looking,' Paddy (Jonathan Groff) is looking for a steady boyfriend in modern San Francisco. He meets Richie (Raúl Castillo) on a BART train. (John P. Johnson / HBO)

In HBO’s new series, ‘Looking,’ Paddy (Jonathan Groff) is looking for a steady boyfriend in modern San Francisco. He meets Richie (Raúl Castillo) on a BART train. (John P. Johnson / HBO)

Guests

Michael Lannan, creator and co-executive producer of the HBO series “Looking.” (@MichaelLannan)

Richard Lawson, Hollywood columnist, Vanity Fair. (@rilaws)

Jonathan Groff, actor. Plays the lead character of Patrick in HBO’s “Looking.”

From Tom’s Reading List

Vanity Fair: ‘Looking’ Is As Gay As It Needs To Be — “The more we’ve ached and clamored for representation, the more impossible expectations we’ve put on any instance of it, to the point that when we arrive at a show like ‘Looking,’ a hazy and kinda soapy glimpse of three guys bumbling around the Bay Area, people like Lowder immediately begin the tried-and-true practice of tearing it down for not being representative enough, or not correctly representative in some crucial way.”

The New Yorker: Boys’ Town – “‘Looking’ is a whole different ball of wax. Sneaky-funny instead of brassy, it is interested not in extremity but in small-bore observation. In this way, it shares a sensibility with the charming ‘Please Like Me,’ an Australian series, now airing on Pivot, which people also initially called ‘the gay ‘Girls.’  Both shows feature diffident heroes, young men who regard retro gay culture with a sense of bemused incredulity, like Christopher Isherwood with a Webcam. ‘Looking’ establishes this generational theme in its first scene, in which Paddy goes cruising, very briefly. He gets a truncated hand job—’Cold hands!’ he complains—but it’s less a sex act than a prank.”

Gawker: ‘Looking?’ Mmmmm, Maybe Another Time — “It’s not easy being a TV show about gay men in 2014. Thanks in part to the power of the internet as a platform for activism and outrage, the responsibilities of representation have never seemed more urgent, or more complicated. To appeal to your gay audience—built-in and notoriously loyal—you need to be realistic. To appeal to everyone else—whose patronage will ultimately make or break—you can’t be too gay. The ideal is something satisfying without the ick factor, something like, and about as likely as, a spontaneous orgasm.”

January 28 2014

10:52

The World According To Carl Hiaasen

Miami Herald columnist Carl Hiaasen joins us on Florida life and politics, from Marco Rubio to Trayvon Martin.

Justin Bieber appears in court via video feed, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in Miami. Bieber was released from jail Thursday following his arrest on charges of driving under the influence, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Police say they stopped the 19-year-old pop star while he was drag-racing down a Miami Beach street before dawn. (AP)

Justin Bieber appears in court via video feed, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in Miami. Bieber was released from jail Thursday following his arrest on charges of driving under the influence, driving with an expired license and resisting arrest. Police say they stopped the 19-year-old pop star while he was drag-racing down a Miami Beach street before dawn. (AP)

Guest

Carl Hiaasen, best-selling novelist and award-winning columnist for The Miami Herald. His new collection of columns is “Dance of the Reptiles: Rampaging Tourists, Marauding Pythons, Larcenous Legislators, Crazed Celebrities, and Tar-Balled Beaches.”

From Tom’s Reading List

Miami Herald: The story A-Rod would love to tell — “As I’ve said all along, I’m totally innocent. I don’t use performance-enhancing drugs, period. And I would never, ever put a strange-looking lozenge under my tongue before a big game. Anybody who knows me will tell you that I’m terrified of lozenges.

Los Angeles Times: Speaker John Boehner tells Leno he favors Jeb Bush in 2016 — “Asked what he thought of the upcoming presidential race in 2016, Boehner said, ‘I’m not endorsing anybody. But Jeb Bush is my friend and, frankly, I think he’d make a great president.’”

National Review: We Need School Choice Now – ”Choice is bringing long-overdue innovation into an antiquated education model, particularly with digital technology. There are blended-learning schools, which mix computer labs with traditional classroom time. There are virtual classes and full-time virtual schools that give all students, no matter their addresses, access to quality curriculum and teachers. Home educators have endless options in selecting high-quality online courses.”

Read An Excerpt Of “Dance of the Reptiles” By Carl Hiaasen

January 25 2014

02:09

Abbevs & The Like: How Web-Words Are Crossing Over

In recent years, a new set of words have emerged — words like totes, meaning ‘totally’; adorbs for ‘adorable’; and LOLs  for ‘laugh-out-loud’. These words have become so prevalent, they have their own name: abbrevs (short for ‘abbreviations’).

You might think that abbrevs are used exclusively online or in texts by middle schoolers. However, these words are also being increasingly documented in oral speech by speakers of all different ages. LOLs, for example, is pronounced lawlz, lowlz, or lulz and is accompanied by a conspicuous lack of genuine laughter. My research (1) investigates these abbrevs. What are they, where did they come from, and why are they so popular?

First things first, how does one make an abbrev? Typically, the word of choice is clipped, or truncated after the stressed syllable, as in prob < probably, but never probab. Then, for some, but not all, an -s suffix is added, resulting in probs.

Abbrevs can be a bit more complicated than that, though. Sometimes vowels are deleted, as in adorbs < adorable. Some words vary as to where exactly the clipping occurs, like obvi, obvs < obviously. Aside from clippings, abbrevs may also be acronyms (LOLs) or contractions (forreal(s), freal(s) < for real). Yet another group of words tend to be reduplicated, or repeated. Consider cray-cray < crazy and a word impressively both clipped and reduplicated: inappropro < inappropriate.

While abbrevs may seem quite modern, many of these processes are centuries old. Tote, from ‘total’ or ‘totally’ can be seen as early as 1772 (2) and the acronym OMG ‘oh my God!’ appears in 1917 (3). This particular abbrev phenomenon seems to derive from a diminutive, a word formation that denotes smallness in size and often other qualities like endearment or intimacy. English has numerous diminutives, like -ski (brewski, broski) and -sie (tootsie, footsie). A diminutive that involves clipping and an -s suffix results in names like Babs < Barbara, cited as early as 1900 (4). This process continues today, as seen in Prince William of England’s nickname Wills. What distinguishes modern abbrevs is that they affect not just names, but also adverbs and interjections.

The rise of abbrevs at the same time as the rise of the internet may not be completely unrelated. Certainly, the character limit on Twitter or the need to text rapidly on cell phones could result in an increase of acronyms and abbreviations (though words like cray cray are in fact longer than their original counterparts). Some studies (5), however, suggest a possible different factor: the need to mark nonverbal communication through text.

Whereas writing in the past was largely done by one person in a letter or novel, modern media allow us to have written conversations in real time. This certainly explains the creation of emoticons and, perhaps, the popularity of Snapchat, which allows users to attach a face to their message. As for abbrevs, these new adverbs and interjections may allow us to mark both endearment to our friends and also those pesky gestures we can’t get across with usual writing. Isn’t that totes cray cray?

– Kenneth Baclawski, Jr.

Kenneth is a first-year PhD candidate student in linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.

References

1. Baclawski, Kenneth, Jr. “A Frequency-Based Analysis of the Modern -s Register- Marking Suffix.” Poster presented at the Linguistic Society of America Annual Meeting, Portland, Oregon, January 6, 2012.

2. Miller, D. Gary. 2014. English Lexicogenesis. Oxford University Press.

3. Ibid.

4. Ibid.

5. Biber, Douglas & Susan Conrad. 2009. Register, Genre, and Style. Cambridge University Press.

For further research on abbrevs, see NPR’s All Tech Considered.

January 23 2014

05:30

How We’re Talking, Like, Today

Verbal tics, and what they say about us. “I’m just saying.” “To tell you the truth.” “As far as I know.”

Beyond the typical

Beyond the typical “kids these days” complaint, plenty of other language trends crop up regardless of age. (Erin Nekervis / Creative Commons)

Guests

Elizabeth Bernstein, Bonds columnists for The Wall Street Journal. (@EbernsteinWSJ)

James Pennebaker, professor and chair of the department of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Author of “The Secret Life Of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us.”

Brandt Johnson, co-founder and principal of Syntaxis, a communications skills training firm in New York City. Author of “Presentation Skills For Business Professionals.”

Kenneth Baclawski, Jr., graduate student in linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.

From The Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Why Verbal Tee-Ups Like ‘To Be Honest’ Often Signal Insincerity – “Certain phrases just seem to creep into our daily speech. We hear them a few times and suddenly we find ourselves using them. We like the way they sound, and we may find they are useful. They may make it easier to say something difficult or buy us a few extra seconds to collect our next thought. Yet for the listener, these phrases are confusing. They make it fairly impossible to understand, or even accurately hear, what the speaker is trying to say.”

Edmonton Journal: Why all the cray-cray words? – “Have I gone cray-cray, or has English become just a little too adorbs? Peeps are buying prezzies and making restaurant rezzies, they’re sharing email addies and eating bacon sammies with their swag boyfs. They’re getting jeal cos their hubs chatted up some hottie. They’re tweeting selfies and shelfies and drelfies, liking fails, hearting pics from their BFF’s winter vacay. Totes ridic! Obvs I get that language changes. ”

New York Times: They’re, Like, Way Ahead of the Linguistic Currrrve — “The idea that young women serve as incubators of vocal trends for the culture at large has longstanding roots in linguistics. As Paris is to fashion, the thinking goes, so are young women to linguistic innovation.”

January 22 2014

08:40

Tech Companies And American Privacy

Beyond the N.S.A. Legal scholar Jeffrey Rosen says we need a constitutional amendment to protect our online privacy from Internet companies. He’s with us.

Former U.S. President James Madison. Though Judge Richard Leon said

Former U.S. President James Madison. Though Judge Richard Leon said “James Madison, who cautioned us to beware of ‘the abridgment of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power,’ would be aghast” in a recent ruling against the N.S.A., Jeffrey Rosen thinks Madison would miss some of the legal limits of modern privacy. (Creative Commons)

Guests

Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington Law School. Legal affairs editor of The New Republic. President and Chief Executive of the National Constitution Center. (@RosenJeffrey)

Adam Thierer, senior research fellow, Technology Policy Program at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. (@AdamThierer)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Madison’s Privacy Blind Spot – “The debate between Judge Leon and Judge Pauley echoes the one between Federalists and Anti-Federalists about the proper scope of government, one Madison, a moderate for his time, so effectively straddled.”

U.S. News & World Report: Relax and Learn to Love Big Data — “In recent years, concerns about our digital privacy have been exacerbated by the growth of ‘big data,’ or massive data sets that are used by companies and other organizations to catalog information about us. These data sets are used to tailor new and better digital services to us and also to target ads to our interests, which helps keep online content and service cheap or free. But some critics still fear the ramifications for our privacy of all this data being collected.”

Bloomberg Businessweek: Security Expert Bruce Schneier Says to Foil NSA Spies, Encrypt Everything — “There is some good news in the Snowden documents, Schneier said, and that’s that encryption still works. The NSA has often been able to get around it because other parts of the equation, like software or hardware, are insecure. Still, most current cryptography gives the NSA some trouble, and a lot of the data that the NSA snags isn’t encrypted. That means we’re making it too easy for the NSA to pursue its ‘collect everything’ mania. Schneier’s solution: encrypt everything we can, from the cloud to cell phones.”

January 21 2014

09:50

Who’s Afraid Of ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street’

“The Wolf of Wall Street” is making waves well beyond its Academy Award nominations. We’ll catch the controversy.

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the Martin Scorese film,

Banker Jordan Belfort (Leonard DiCaprio) runs a high-profile penny stock firm that pulls in big fees on nearly worthless stocks in the new Martin Scorsese film, “The Wolf Of Wall Street.” (Paramount Pictures)

Guests

David Edelstein, chief film critic for New York Magazine. Film critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air” and CBS’ “This Morning.”

Issac Chotiner, senior editor at The New Republic. (@IChotiner)

Joel Cohen, prosecutor with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

Sam Polk, founder and executive director of Groceryships. Former Wall Street trader. (@SamPolk)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wrap: War Over ‘Wolf of Wall Street’: Scorsese’s Latest Ignites Online Brouhaha — “The donnybrook that has emerged online, however, covers much broader ground: Is Scorsese, some viewers ask, satirizing the outrageous behavior he’s portraying onscreen, or is he celebrating it? Belfort, after all, gets off (spoiler alert) with a slap on the wrist for his crimes, and the film never takes a pronounced stance regarding Belfort and his colleagues bilking their clients out of millions of dollars.”

L.A. Weekly: An Open Letter to the Makers of The Wolf of Wall Street, and the Wolf Himself — “As an 18-year-old, I had no idea what was going on. But then again, did anyone? Certainly your investors didn’t – and they were left holding the bag when you cashed out your holdings and got rich off their money. So Marty and Leo, while you glide through press junkets and look forward to awards season, let me tell you the truth – what happened to my mother, my two sisters and me.”

New York Times: For the Love of Money –”I wanted a billion dollars. It’s staggering to think that in the course of five years, I’d gone from being thrilled at my first bonus — $40,000 — to being disappointed when, my second year at the hedge fund, I was paid ‘only’ $1.5 million.”

January 20 2014

07:10

Fox, MSNBC And The Roger Ailes Story

Gabriel Sherman on Fox News mastermind Roger Ailes and our polarized American media, from Fox to MSNBC.

In this Sept. 29, 2006 file photo, Fox News CEO Roger Ailes poses at Fox News in New York. Propelled by Ailes'

In this Sept. 29, 2006 file photo, Fox News CEO Roger Ailes poses at Fox News in New York. Propelled by Ailes’ “fair and balanced” branding, Fox has targeted viewers who believe the other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, display a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivers them with unvarnished truth. (AP)

Guests

Gabriel Sherman, contributing editor at New York Magazine. Author of “The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News — And Divided A Country.” (@gabrielsherman)

Kalefa Sanneh, staff writer for the New Yorker.

Bryan Monroe, editor at CNNPolitics.com (@BryanMonroeCNN)

From Tom’s Reading List

The New Republic: Roger Ailes Is Not That Powerful — “It is to Sherman’s credit that he both elicits sympathy for Ailes, and quickly dispels any hope that Ailes’s story is an uplifting one. This book is not about overcoming one’s odds, and rising above pettiness. No, pretty soon young Roger is off working for The Mike Douglas Show and then Richard Nixon, who had a similarly rough upbringing, and who happened to have all the qualities that Ailes would eventually develop: pettiness, self-pity, and paranoia.”

Slate: The Troublemaker — “Sherman’s story is most vivid when it quotes Ailes himself. But, in a fairly underhanded way, only at the end does Sherman reveal that Ailes refused to talk to him. The book is, in effect, a compilation of Ailes’ memorable public barbs and bon mots. These are often presented as direct quotes, creating a puzzling effect: You want more, but the author, with only his Ailes bits and bobs, can’t give it.”

The New Yorker: Twenty Four Hour Party People – “The decisions that Maddow makes go a long way toward defining what MSNBC is, too. Phil Griffin, the president, calls Maddow “our quarterback,” the person who sets the tone for the network. A few years ago, MSNBC had a different quarterback: Keith Olbermann, a former ESPN anchor who rose to fame during the Bush years, delivering urbane, fuguelike denunciations of a President who was sometimes known, on his show, as “you, sir.” Olbermann and MSNBC agreed to a no-fault divorce in early 2011, and Griffin has spent the past two and a half years reinventing the network in Maddow’s image. At almost any time of the day, you can turn it on and encounter someone whose liberalism is earnest, upbeat, and perhaps a little wonky.”

Read An Excerpt Of “The Loudest Voice In The Room” By Gabriel Sherman

January 19 2014

05:11

HatchetJob.com : HJ106 - Why how you practice affects how good you'll get

HatchetJob.com - a videogames podcast about more than games http://hatchetjob.libsyn.com/hj106-why-how-you-practice-affects-how-good-you-ll-get

January 17 2014

09:01

Sochi 2014: Putin’s Costly, Controversial Winter Olympics

Sports and politics at the Winter Olympics in Sochi. We’ll talk with top Olympians — Alpine skier Mikaela Shiffrin and figure skater Jason Brown — on the games in Russia.

This Oct. 24, 2013 file photo shows the illuminated Olympic Bolshoy stadium, in the background, and Iceberg stadium, the location for figure skating and short track speed skating events during the 2014 Olympic Games, in the Olympic park in the coastal cluster in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia. (AP)

This Oct. 24, 2013 file photo shows the illuminated Olympic Bolshoy stadium, in the background, and Iceberg stadium, the location for figure skating and short track speed skating events during the 2014 Olympic Games, in the Olympic park in the coastal cluster in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia. (AP)

Guests

Angela Stent, professor and director of the Center for Eurasian, Russia and East European Studies program at Georgetown University. Senior fellow at the Brookings Insitution. Author of “The Limits of Partnership: US – Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century” and “Repairing US-Russian Relations: A Long Road Ahead.” (@AngelaStent)

Mikaela Shiffrin, Olympic Alpine skier, member of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Team. (@MikaelaShiffrin)

Jason Brown, figure skater, member of the 2014 U.S. Olympic Team. (@jasonbskates)

John Cherwa, Tribune Newspapers Olympic bureau chief, deputy sports editor at The Los Angeles Times. (@jcherwa)

From Tom’s Reading List

Globe and Mail: In Sochi, anger and controversy of Olympic proportions – “When this southern Russian city was awarded the 2014 Winter Olympics seven years ago, most of the country celebrated, feeling a burst of national pride. But Yulia Saltikova quietly cursed the television set. Life in her native city, she felt, was about to go from difficult to worse. That premonition has proved sadly correct. Winning the Olympics has brought a carnival of construction to this palm-tree-lined resort on the Black Sea, to prepare for the most expensive Games ever, slated to cost at least $50-billion (U.S.).”

Bloomberg Businessweek: Putin ski run fails to ease Sochi fears – “Security experts are pretty confident that Putin’s police will manage to seal off the mountain-fringed Black Sea resort town of 343,000, shielding the bobsled runs, ski-jump courses, the athletes’ village and the high-end hotels. Putin will have a more difficult time to make his Jan. 3 hit-the-slopes message carry far beyond Sochi. It didn’t get through to whoever was responsible for the six bullet-riddled bodies found in abandoned cars last week. The incident less than an hour’s flight from next month’s Olympic venue continued a wave of violence.”

USA Today: Olympic charter places athletes in tough spot for Sochi — “As controversy has overshadowed the Sochi Games and gay rights groups have called on the IOC to take action, IOC president Jacques Rogge has pointed out that the IOC is a sports organization, not a government or a political body. ‘One should not forget that the International Olympic Committee cannot be expected to have influence over the sovereign affairs of a country,’ Rogge said. Tuesday a new president will be elected, one who will inherit an issue not expected to fade. So how to reconcile this? One of the IOC’s roles is: ‘To act against any form of discrimination affecting the Olympic movement.’”

Watch U.S. Figure Skater Jason Brown’s Routine At the 2014 U.S. Figure Skate Championship

07:28

TLDR #11 - RIP VILE RAT

On September 11th, 2012, gunmen attacked two American compounds in Benghazi, Libya, killing four Americans. Sean Smith, one of the four killed in the attack, was an IT manager in the real world, but online, he was Vile Rat, a hugely influential diplomat in the video game Eve Online. Alex talks to Sean's friend Alex "The Mittani" Gianturco about who Sean was both in Eve and in the real world.

January 15 2014

05:11

Women And Internet Harassment

Internet aggression toward women. What’s it about? How do we fix it? Plus, a media firestorm around tweeting through cancer.

A woman uses a personal computer. (Ray Smith / Flickr / Creative Commons)

A woman uses a personal computer. (Ray Smith / Flickr / Creative Commons)

Guests

Amanda Hess, freelance writer. Author of “Why Women Aren’t Welcome On the Internet.” (@AmandaHess)

Anna Holmes,  founding editor of Jezebel.com, the online women’s news and culture magazine. Author of “The Book of Jezebel: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Lady Things” and “Hell Hath No Fury: Women’s Letters From The End of the Affair.” Columnist at the New York Times Book Review. (AnnaHolmes">@AnnaHolmes)

Danielle Citron, professor of law the University of Maryland, Balitmore. Author of “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace.” (@DANIELLECITRON)

From Tom’s Reading List

Pacific Standard: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet — “A woman doesn’t even need to occupy a professional writing perch at a prominent platform to become a target. According to a 2005 report by the Pew Research Center, which has been tracking the online lives of Americans for more than a decade, women and men have been logging on in equal numbers since 2000, but the vilest communications are still disproportionately lobbed at women. We are more likely to report being stalked and harassed on the Internet—of the 3,787 people who reported harassing incidents from 2000 to 2012 to the volunteer organization Working to Halt Online Abuse, 72.5 percent were female. ”

New York Times: The War on Women — “I don’t think either the left or the right quite understands this worldview: feminists tend to see it simply as a species of reaction, social conservatives as the dark fruit of sexual liberation, when it’s really a combination of the two. And because it channels some legitimate male anxieties alongside its chauvinism and resentment, it probably can’t be shamed or driven underground — or not, at least, without making its side effects for women that much more toxic.”

The Wire: Welcome to the Twisted Age of the Twitter Death Threat — “Enter the age of the online death threat. It’s scary, yeah, because it’s a death threat. Humans rarely like being threatened with an end to their basic essence, no matter the delivery method for that announcement. And yet, on Twitter, this becomes such a weird, surreal concept: It’s deeply impersonal (these people don’t even know each other and probably never will; NONE of them know each other, likely), fueled by a false kind of rage spawned by the way the Internet works (one side gets self-righteously mad, another side self-righteously madder, and repeat). Fortunately, in most cases, the threat is also incredibly unlikely to be fulfilled. ”

The Media-Firestorm Around Tweeting Through Cancer

Lisa Belkin, senior correspondent for The Huffington Post. Author of “Life’s Work: Confessions of an Unbalanced Mom,” Show Me A Hero,” and “First, Do No Harm.”  (@LisaBelkin)

The Huffington Post: Lisa Bonchek Adams And The Problem With Criticizing A Woman Who Documents Her Cancer Treatment Online  – “True we need a national conversation about ‘how much is too much.’ But the reason the lines are blurred in the first place — i.e. the very reason we need that conversation — is because what is one patient’s torture is another’s reassurance that they have done everything they could. Emma’s father was 79 when he died two years ago, with multiple health problems. Lisa Adams was 37 when she was diagnosed seven years ago, with three young children. Yes, her years of treatment have been agonizing at times, and I would not presume to tell any patient that they must choose that painful, possibly fruitless, path. I also would never dream of telling them that they shouldn’t. What Bill sees as extra years of ‘frantic medical trench warfare,’ Adams sees more simply as extra years.”

January 14 2014

16:15

On The Media #10 - ONE HUNDRED SONGS A DAY

One way to make money making music online is the boring way. Write one song that does incredibly well and ... http://www.onthemedia.org/story/tldr-hundred-songs/
14:17

Media Futures (1 of 4) - Newspapers | BBC World Service - The Documentary,

With more news now available online does the internet spell doom for the daily newspaper? As more and more news is available online, the idea of buying a traditional newspaper is fast becoming a thing of the past. Or is it? Some parts of the world are still enjoying strong print circulation. And even places like the west where newspaper sales are plummeting, it has often proved difficult to make the digital alternative pay its way. In part one of this four-part series, Mark Coles asks what is the future for newspapers? And if they survive, how will they need to change? http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0199y2s http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0199y26
08:21

America’s Cultural Exports Now

How the world sees the United States. American cultural exports now, from Miley Cyrus to “The Hunger Games.”

WreckingMiley

A still from pop singer Miley Cyrus’ music video for her song “Wrecking Ball.” (Vevo)

Guests

Martha Bayles, humanities professor at Boston College. Author of “Through a Screen Darkly: Popular Culture, Public Diplomacy and America’s Image Abroad.”

From Tom’s Reading List

The Washington Post: Now Showing: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Americans — “Today, as we witness the decline of America’s reputation around the world, we’re paying far more attention to Franklin’s first stratagem than to his second. Indeed, despite a mounting stack of reports recommending drastic changes in the organization and funding of public diplomacy, very little of substance has been done. And most Americans, including many who make it their business to analyze public diplomacy, seem unmindful of the negative impression that America has recently been making on the rest of humanity — via our popular culture.”

ThinkProgress: From Angry Birds To Shark Energy Drink, Five Cultural Exports That Are Big In Myanmar — “Lots of folks in Myanmar wear t-shirts in English–my favorite, spotted in Bogyoke Aung San Market, was ‘We Love Fixed Gear Bikes’ –but among the most frequent are shirts for metal bands, particularly Metallica and Led Zepplin. I’m told, though, that the most popular metal band in Myanmar is Iron Cross (not the hardcore band from the Washington, DC area, but a local iteration) that’s popular in part because of its role playing benefits for Cyclone Nargis recovery.”

The Hollywood Reporter: Soul-Searching in China Over Weak Movie Sales Abroad — “While China’s domestic box office in 2012 was a hefty $2.8 billion, overseas earnings were just 1.1 billion yuan ($180 million), down nearly 50 percent on the $330 million clocked up in 2011. ’The dissemination of Chinese films overseas in 2012 saw few highlights, and it’s worrisome,’ said Huang Huilin, director of the AICCC, to Chinese media outlet Global Times.”

Read An Excerpt From “Through a Screen Darkly: Popular Culture, Public Diplomacy and America’s Image Abroad” By Martha Bayles

January 10 2014

23:45

On The Media - THE MYTH OF 'BLUE MONDAY,' THE CAMPAIGN FOR CREATIONISM, AND A LYING CYBORG TELEMARKETER

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