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February 17 2014

22:02

February 04 2014

08:41

‘Emerging Markets’ Take A Hit

“Emerging markets” around the world — Turkey, Argentina, South Africa, more – were supposed to be the next big wave of economic energy. Now, they’re in trouble. We’ll ask why.

The going rate of U.S. dollars and euros is displayed outside a foreign exchange business in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014. The Argentine government announced Friday Jan. 24, it was relaxing restrictions on the purchase of U.S. dollars. The measure would start taking effect Monday, allowing Argentines to buy dollars for personal savings, reversing a 2012 restriction. (AP)

The going rate of U.S. dollars and euros is displayed outside a foreign exchange business in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014. The Argentine government announced Friday Jan. 24, it was relaxing restrictions on the purchase of U.S. dollars. The measure would start taking effect Monday, allowing Argentines to buy dollars for personal savings, reversing a 2012 restriction. (AP)

Guests

Mike Regan, editor-at-large for Bloomberg News. (@Reganonymous)

Scheherazade Rehman, professor of international business, finance and international affairs at George Washington University. (@Prof_Rehman)

Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group. Author of “Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers In a G-Zero World.” (@ianbremmer)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Economist: China loses its allure –”For the past three decades, multinationals have poured in. After the financial crisis, many companies looked to China for salvation. Now it looks as though the gold rush may be over.”

Wall Street Journal: Gobal Companies Address Latin American Risk — “Drooping currencies in Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela have reduced the value of sales there in dollar terms, while inflation has made it hard for many consumers to afford much beyond necessities. Argentina’s heavy government spending and a loose money policy have fueled inflation estimated at more than 25% a year. In Venezuela, inflation is running at more than 50%, and price controls are creating shortages.”

Reuters: Weak U.S. data sends dollar, equities lower — “Emerging market stocks extended a two-week selloff as weak Chinese manufacturing and services data weighed, while the Turkish lira and South African rand weakened after policymakers poured cold water on expectations of higher local interest rates.”

06:42

USNI Blog » Blog Archive » Sea Control 20 – McGrath on Maritime Strategy

Matthew Hipple is a surface warfare officer and graduate of Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. He is Director of the NEXTWAR blog and hosts of the Sea Control podcast. While his opinions may not reflect those of the United States Navy, Department of Defense, or US Government, he wishes they did. Did he mention he was host of the Sea Control podcast? You should start listening to that on Itunes, Xbox Music, or Stitcher Stream Radio. @AmericaHipple http://blog.usni.org/2014/02/03/sea-control-20-mcgrath-on-maritime-strategy

January 30 2014

10:42

The Next Trade Frontier

President Obama is pushing for two big new trade deals – in the Pacific, with Europe. Democrats are resisting. We’ll dig in.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second right, speaks with his country's Trade Representative Michael Froman, as New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, second left, speaks with his Trade Minister Tim Groser, left, at the Trans-Pacific Partnership meet in Bali, Indonesia, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Leaders of the dozen countries involved in the U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership met in Bali after the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit to work on plans for a free trade area they hope will eventually encompass the entire region. (AP)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second right, speaks with his country’s Trade Representative Michael Froman, as New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, second left, speaks with his Trade Minister Tim Groser, left, at the Trans-Pacific Partnership meet in Bali, Indonesia, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Leaders of the dozen countries involved in the U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership met in Bali after the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit to work on plans for a free trade area they hope will eventually encompass the entire region. (AP)

Guests

William Mauldin, international economics and trade correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. (@willmauldin)

Jim Kolbe, senior transatlantic fellow for the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Former 11-term Congressman (R-Arizona). Strategic consultant to the Council on Foreign Relations.

Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic Policy Research. (@markweisbrot)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Guardian: NAFTA: 20 years of regret for Mexico — “Our neglected infrastructure aside, it is easy to see that NAFTA was a bad deal for most Americans. The promised trade surpluses with Mexico turned out to be deficits, some hundreds of thousands of jobs were lost, and there was downward pressure on US wages – which was, after all, the purpose of the agreement. This was not like the European Union’s (pre-Eurozone) economic integration, which allocated hundreds of billions of dollars of development aid to the poorer countries of Europe so as to pull their living standards up toward the average. ”

Washington Post: In Davos, nations vow to extend global trade deal — “WTO Director-General Robert Azevedo said negotiating process must be transparent and inclusive, so every member can have a voice and participate, but that ‘the do-ability test is very important” in working toward an expanded free-trade deal that balances “ambition and realism.’ The Bali deal could boost global trade by $1 trillion over time, and its centerpiece was an agreement on measures to ease barriers to trade by simplifying customs procedures and making them more transparent.”

Wall Street Journal: Lawmakers Unveil ‘Fast Track’ Bill for Trade Agreements — “Under the fast-track procedure, known formally as ‘trade promotion authority,’ Congress agrees to approve trade deals with an up-or-down vote, without amending them or slowing them down with procedural tactics. But the measure is shaping up as a hard sell on Capitol Hill, and even groups that support it say they don’t expect it to advance without a fight. Labor groups and some environmental organizations oppose it, and a number of Democrats are unhappy that the currency language is nonbinding, meaning negotiators will press countries to comply but can fall short of the goal.”

January 24 2014

15:41

Giana Eckhardt – Consuming Buddhists | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

  Event Date: 23 January 2014 Windsor Auditorium Royal Holloway University of London Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX The School of Management at http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2014/01/giana-eckhardt-consuming-buddhists/

January 17 2014

15:41

Hans van der Ven – The Chinese Maritime Customs Service, the 1911 Revolution, and the Bond Markets | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

Event Date: 16 January 2014 Royal Asiatic Society Stephenson Way London NW1 2HD   The Royal Asiatic Society presents: Professor Hans van der V http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2014/01/hans-van-der-ven-the-chinese-maritime-customs-service-the-1911-revolution-and-the-bond-markets/

January 15 2014

13:37

Cubed Episode 14: CES 2014, Wearables, China, and the Internet of Things

Today’s show we discuss what we saw coming out of CES that was of interest and explore longer term market implications for existing categories like PCs, tablets, and smartphones. We also discuss where we see things like wearables and the Internet of things are headed. http://cubed.fm/2014/01/cubed-episode-14-ces-2014-wearables-china-and-the-internet-of-things/

January 14 2014

08:21

America’s Cultural Exports Now

How the world sees the United States. American cultural exports now, from Miley Cyrus to “The Hunger Games.”

WreckingMiley

A still from pop singer Miley Cyrus’ music video for her song “Wrecking Ball.” (Vevo)

Guests

Martha Bayles, humanities professor at Boston College. Author of “Through a Screen Darkly: Popular Culture, Public Diplomacy and America’s Image Abroad.”

From Tom’s Reading List

The Washington Post: Now Showing: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Americans — “Today, as we witness the decline of America’s reputation around the world, we’re paying far more attention to Franklin’s first stratagem than to his second. Indeed, despite a mounting stack of reports recommending drastic changes in the organization and funding of public diplomacy, very little of substance has been done. And most Americans, including many who make it their business to analyze public diplomacy, seem unmindful of the negative impression that America has recently been making on the rest of humanity — via our popular culture.”

ThinkProgress: From Angry Birds To Shark Energy Drink, Five Cultural Exports That Are Big In Myanmar — “Lots of folks in Myanmar wear t-shirts in English–my favorite, spotted in Bogyoke Aung San Market, was ‘We Love Fixed Gear Bikes’ –but among the most frequent are shirts for metal bands, particularly Metallica and Led Zepplin. I’m told, though, that the most popular metal band in Myanmar is Iron Cross (not the hardcore band from the Washington, DC area, but a local iteration) that’s popular in part because of its role playing benefits for Cyclone Nargis recovery.”

The Hollywood Reporter: Soul-Searching in China Over Weak Movie Sales Abroad — “While China’s domestic box office in 2012 was a hefty $2.8 billion, overseas earnings were just 1.1 billion yuan ($180 million), down nearly 50 percent on the $330 million clocked up in 2011. ’The dissemination of Chinese films overseas in 2012 saw few highlights, and it’s worrisome,’ said Huang Huilin, director of the AICCC, to Chinese media outlet Global Times.”

Read An Excerpt From “Through a Screen Darkly: Popular Culture, Public Diplomacy and America’s Image Abroad” By Martha Bayles

January 10 2014

11:28

Mit "Assam" und "Darjeeling" zum Erfolg | NDR.de - NDR Info

Am 10. Januar 1839 kommt erstmals Tee aus Indien in London in den Handel. Heute ist Indien das größte Teeanbauland der Welt und liefert fast 30 Prozent des Tees weltweit. http://www.ndr.de/info/audio188327.html

January 04 2014

16:32

China before Mao - Rear Vision - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

As the People's Republic celebrates its sixtieth birthday, Rear Vision looks at China before Mao and the background to the Communist revolution. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/rearvision/china-before-mao/3064564

December 23 2013

02:13

The World: How do you say you're sorry for taking part in China's 'Cultural Revolution'?

The 'Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution' turned China upside down for the whole decade starting in 1966. Now, some aging participants in those years of political upheaval are looking back at their own actions and they are offering an apology for what they did.

December 19 2013

05:22

A More Assertive China

China is getting more aggressive— at sea, in the air, in space, with journalists. We’ll look at China’s assertive moment.

Chinese Defense Minister Chang Wanquan inspects a guard of honor during a welcome ceremony prior to a meeting with Indonesian Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, Dec. 16, 2013. (AP)

Chinese Defense Minister Chang Wanquan inspects a guard of honor during a welcome ceremony prior to a meeting with Indonesian Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, Dec. 16, 2013. (AP)

Guests

Jonathan Fenby, writer, journalist and analyst. Former editor of the Observer Newspaper and South China Morning Post. Author of “Tiger Head, Snake Tails: China Today, How It Got There and Where It Is Heading,” “Modern China: The Fall and Rise of a Great Power” and the forthcoming “Will China Dominate the 21st Century?” Managing director of the China team at Trusted Sources.

Dean Cheng, senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center.

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: China’s Regional Aggression Takes Flight “In recent weeks, the Chinese have reportedly agreed to purchase Russian Su-35 fighters, among the most advanced in the world. Beijing also has unveiled an upgraded strategic bomber that will carry a new long-range land attack cruise missile. In September, Chinese air forces flew remotely piloted surveillance drones over the Senkakus.”

Foreign Policy: Chinese Netizens Applaud Beijing’s Aggressive New Defense Zone — “On Sina Weibo, China’s Twitter, over 200,000 recent posts mention the air defense map; of those sampled, the vast majority lauded Beijing for defending China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. As one user wrote, the map ‘lets the little Japanese know that our power does not stop at the tip of our tongue.’ Another wrote it was time for China to ‘take Japan to school and teach it how to act.’”

TIME: Foreign Correspondents in China Do Not Censor Themselves to Get Visas — “The situation isn’t pleasant. Already, the epic air pollution in Beijing, as well as a perceived hardening by the Chinese government toward the foreign business community, has caused many expats to flee. Among foreigners, 2013 has been the year of good-bye parties. When I left Beijing on Sunday, I joked with friends that I might not see them back in China. But it wasn’t that funny.

December 13 2013

08:32

Week In The News: Budget Deal, Mourning Mandela And The Struggle In Ukraine

A budget deal, a handshake, a struggle in Ukraine and the world mourns Mandela. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Nancy Cordes, Congressional correspondent for CBS News. (@nancycordes)

Michael Hirsh, chief correspondent for the National Journal. (@michaelphirsh)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

National Journal: Behind the ‘Volcker Rule’: The Mutt-and-Jeff Team That Tackled Wall Street – “The Volcker Rule was, in fact, in grave danger of being loopholed to death right up until its adoption this week. And in the end it was largely one regulator, more than any other, stood firm against those efforts and managed to avert the worst of the watering down: Gary Gensler, the outgoing chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. As diminutive in stature as Volcker is towering, Gensler was the Jeff to Volcker’s Mutt, an essential part of a de facto team.”

Washington Post: Sebelius: Enrollment up with improving HealthCare.gov; review of problems launched — “The administration announced Wednesday that about 365,000 Americans chose health plans during the first two months of the federal and state insurance marketplaces, bringing the total to more than triple the meager enrollment from October. A report accompanying the announcement showed that the number of people who collectively signed up for coverage in the 14 states running their own insurance exchanges continued to outpace the total enrollment from the three dozen states relying on the federal marketplace.”

Reuters: U.S. schools look to guards, technology a year after Sandy Hook — “Schools are aiming to stop gun scares and killings, such as the shooting deaths of three students at an Ohio high school in February 2012, the wounding of two students at a California high school in January 2013 and a potential mass shooting at a Georgia elementary school in August that was averted when a school bookkeeper talked the gunman into laying down his AK-47 assault rifle. The number of school resource officers or law enforcement officers assigned to schools has risen to levels not seen since the aftermath of the 1999 Columbine High School ‘massacre’ in Colorado, in which 13 people were shot to death, said Maurice Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers.”

December 11 2013

09:22

Africa: Post-Mandela

After Mandela, a look at the challenges and opportunities of sub-Saharan Africa.

Guests

Sean Jacobs, editor of the blog Africa is a Country. Assistant professor of international affairs at the The New School’s Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy. Editor, “Thabo Mbeki’s World: The Politics and Ideology of the South African President.” (@AfricaIsACountry)

Vera Songwe, World Bank country director for Senegal, Cape Verde, Gambia, Mauritania and Guinea-Bissau and lead economist. Non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Africa Growth Initiative.

Mike Obel, markets editor for the International Business Times. (@MikeObel)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: Mandela’s Death Takes Heat Off Zuma – “It is a sharp turnabout for a president who has been under fire during much of his nearly five years in office. The most recent public flap relates to a probe by the government’s anticorruption watchdog into a $20 million security upgrade at his rural home in the village of Nkandla, in KwaZulu-Natal province. South African lawmakers accuse the president of lying about the upgrades and have threatened a motion of impeachment if the watchdog, the Public Protector, finds that Mr. Zuma used public money for nonsecurity improvements at his home.”

Foreign Affairs: A Cure for Africa’s Common Cold — “The main challenge is coalescing political will to do the job. Despite its tremendous burden on affected societies, malaria, in the most heavily infected places, is considered a ‘relatively minor malady,’ in the words of a 2003 World Health Organization (WHO) report. That might seem counterintuitive, but it is a matter of simple risk perception. In places such as Malawi, where the average rural villager receives hundreds of bites from malaria-infected mosquitoes a year, a child might suffer 12 episodes of malaria before the age of two.”

The Atlantic: Is China Transforming Africa? – “There are both very positive and negative aspects to the Chinese presence in Africa. I think arguments that China’s involvement in Africa is a form of neo-colonialism are both simplistic and prejudiced, but there also plenty of people looking at Chinese economic and political ties to Africa through rose-tinted glasses. It is certainly refreshing for African countries to deal with an enthusiastic new global player with deep pockets and little interest in pushing an ideology. It is up to African political and business leaders to make sure that their own countries do not get a raw deal.”

December 06 2013

11:12

Week In The News: Biden In Beijing, Pension Reforms And Nelson Mandela

Biden in Beijing. Public pensions under the gun. Remembering Nelson Mandela – our Weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

Gideon Roseeditor of Foreign Affairs.

David Shepardson, Washington, D.C. bureau chief for The Detroit News. (@davidshepardson)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst.

From Tom’s Reading List

Detroit News: Detroit pension funds seek direct appeal of bankruptcy ruling — “The city’s pension funds and its largest union asked for permission Wednesday to appeal the city’s bankruptcy eligibility to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing the historic case needs to be heard by a higher court before retiree pensions are cut. The pension funds and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees are trying to protect retiree pensions from cuts in a fight that could lead to the U.S. Supreme Court and avoid a ruling that could impact pensions in struggling cities nationwide.”

BBC News: US and China in ‘very direct’ air zone talks — “Talks in Mr Biden’s Asia trip have been dominated by a new air zone declared by China, which covers islands controlled by Japan in the East China Sea. China says its move is consistent with ‘international law and practice.’ China announced a new Air Defence Identification Zone (ADIZ) last month, and said aircraft flying through the zone must follow its rules, including filing flight plans. The ADIZ covers islands claimed and controlled by Japan, and a submerged rock claimed by South Korea.”

New York Daily News: MTA: Alert system for engineer was on wrong end of derailed Metro-North train — “The ‘alerter’ system sounds a warning after 25 seconds of inactivity from the engineer. It can activate the brakes automatically if the engineer doesn’t respond to the prompt in 15 seconds. That may have prevented disaster when engineer William Rockefeller apparently nodded off before the train approached a sharp curve near the Spuyten Duyvil station in the Bronx on Sunday morning — a bend that requires trains to slow down from a 70 mph limit to just 30 mph.”

November 26 2013

05:05

China Chooses Change In Ten-Year Outlook

China’s ten-year plan. Economic changes. Social changes. The planned new face of modern China.

Guests

Andrew BrowneChina columnist for The Wall Street Journal. (@andybrownewsj)

Susan Shirkchair of the 21st Century China Program and Ho Miu Lam Professor of China and Pacific Relations at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) at the University of California, San Diego. (@IRPS)

Damien Ma, fellow at the Paulson Institute. Author of “In Line Behind a Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China’s Ascent In the Next Decade.” (@damienics)

From Tom’s Reading List

Wall Street Journal: After Long Wind-Up, Xi Delivers Anticlimax — “The details were almost completely missing, even though the document ticked off many of the items that appear on standard lists of reform objectives for China, both inside and outside the country. These include pledges to overhaul the fiscal system, health care and education. The party has historically signaled policy changes in words and phrases that appear as riddles to outsiders, In that vein, the language of the communiqué does offer a few tantalizing, if murky, clues to deeper reform that may lie ahead.”

NPR: China Sends ‘Peace Ark’ To Philippines Via Choppy Political Seas — “If you look at online polls, actually a lot of people were against giving aid to the Philippines. One of the things that they did was they cited this island dispute. They also – some people don’t think it’s really appropriate. Despite the incredible economic growth here, many Chinese are still relatively poor. And a lot of Chinese feel that the government should spend money on its own people and spend money at home.”

BBC: No siblings: A side-effect of China’s one-child policy — “The result – China’s new singletons were more educated than generations before them. And Chinese education costs soared overnight. In the past, parents would usually choose just one of their children to progress in school. But after the one-child policy came into practice, each single child shouldered this focused pressure from two parents.”

November 15 2013

16:00

Amy Tan Turns To Family In ‘Amazement’

Author Amy Tan on her latest – family history and the courtesan life of Old Shanghai.

Novelist Amy Tan broke open the world of Chinese immigrant family stories and mother-daughter history with “The Joy Luck Club” in 1989.  She’s worked that field ever since, going deep on the secrets and threads that shape a family’s trail across two cultures.  This time out she plunges into the courtesan world of old Shanghai.  Sex and ritual and business between traditional Chinese society and a looming West.  “Fifty Shades of Tan,” she’s called it.  But it’s still about family hopes and dreams and bitter realities.  Up next On Point:  Amy Tan and “The Valley of Amazement.”

– Tom Ashbrook

Guest

Amy Tan, author of the new novel, “The Valley Of Amazement.” Also author of “The Joy Luck Club,” “The Kitchen God’s Wife,” “The Bonesetter’s Daughter,” “Saving Fish From Drowning,” and “The Hundred Secret Senses.” (@AmyTan)

From Tom’s Reading List

Read An Excerpt From “The Valley Of Amazement” By Amy Tan

November 12 2013

13:57

Cubed 008: When Two Markets Look Like One

Today the topic is the post PC Era. Ben Bajarin and Benedict Evans dive into the some of the trends around the post-PC era and discuss the different markets being enabled by iOS and Android with regard to smartphones and tablets. http://cubed.fm/2013/11/cubed-008-when-two-markets-looking-like-one/

October 13 2013

19:58

Restless Empire: China and the world since 1750 - Video and audio - News and media - Home

Speaker(s): Professor Arne Westad Chair: Professor Michael Cox Recorded on 1 November 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building. Arne Westad argues that China’s role in international affairs over the past 250 years has been determined by the country’s restless irresolution and its immense capacity for change. In this lecture he will discuss the significance of China’s past for its behaviour in international affairs today. Arne Westad is director of LSE IDEAS. http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1629

October 08 2013

04:05

A Global Summit In Asia (Without The United States)

The president of the United States is missing from a big summit of Asia-Pacific nations this week. China is happy to step in. We look at how the U.S. is doing in its pivot to Asia.

Guests

Indira Lakshmanan, senior correspondent for Bloomberg News covering foreign policy, former Asia Bureau Chief for The Boston Globe. (@Indira_L)

Susan Shirk, chair of the 21st Century China Program at the University of California-San Diego. (@IRPS)

From Tom’s Reading List

New York Times: Obama’s Absence Leaves China As Dominant Force At APEC – “The partnership, a major element of Mr. Obama’s pivot toward Asia, is intended to achieve open market access among the 12 participants, with the United States, Japan, Mexico and Canada as the major economies. The administration was hoping that the leader of South Korea, Park Geun-hye, would announce at the meeting that South Korea was ready to join the negotiations. But South Korean officials said Ms. Park would not make that declaration in Bali.”

Wall Street Journal: U.S. Seeks to Reassure Trade Partners After Obama Cancels Trip – “Mr. Obama has canceled major overseas visits to Asia in the past. In 2010 he called off trips to Indonesia and Australia amid a debate over health care at home and also the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Last year, he skipped APEC in Russia because it clashed with the closing stages of the presidential election campaign.But his administration has repeatedly affirmed the U.S.’s commitment to building stronger ties in the region, often referring to America as a Pacific power.Mr. Kerry said scrapping the trip upended an opportunity to build Mr. Obama’s dialogues with President Vladimir Putin of Russia and China’s President Xi Jinping.”

AP: With Obama Out, Others Take APEC Stage, Sort Of – “For Obama, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation summit was meant to be an opportunity to underline renewed U.S. attention to Asia as a counterbalance to China’s increased economic and military clout. But that message was undermined by the U.S. budget impasse and government shutdown forcing Obama to cancel his trip to Indonesia and three other countries. His absence was perhaps felt most by Indonesians who consider him one of their own after he spent part of his childhood growing up in the capital, Jakarta.”

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