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February 22 2017

05:01

President Trump Could Ramp Up Deportation

New guidelines from the Trump Administration give more power to U.S. officials to deport undocumented immigrants. The new, tough rules are causing alarm and fear in immigrant communities.
05:00

Gene-Editing Gets A Go-Ahead

Growing support for human gene-editing. We’ll look at new breakthroughs and the ethical debate.

February 21 2017

18:03

President Trump And A Worried Europe

America in Europe. The president’s envoys try to reassure Europe and NATO that we’re all still on the same team, but Europe wonders.
17:39

A Scathing Critique Of Contemporary Feminism

A controversial call to rework modern feminism -- and embrace a new kind of radical and take back the movement from banality.

February 20 2017

17:06

A More Physical Form Of Mindfulness

How intelligence lives beyond the brain. In your body. Intelligence, in the flesh.
17:04

Reinventing Your Life, Your Career

Second acts in life. We’ll look at what it takes to reinvent yourself, your career – early, mid-life, and late.

February 17 2017

18:57

#OnPointListens: Economic Futures, In Detroit And America

We are in Detroit on our national listening tour, talking about the American economy in the age of Trump.
18:19

Week In The News: Flynn Fired, Puzder Backs Out, Oroville Dam

Michael Flynn fired. Calls to investigate Trump’s Russia ties. Netanyahu at the White House. California dam crisis. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

February 16 2017

19:09

Mo Willems Talks To Children – And Us

Mo Willems, acclaimed children’s author and illustrator, joins us to talk Knuffle Bunny, Nanette’s baguette and finding empathy in today’s world.
18:25

Tax Reform And Your Shopping Cart

Tax reform -- American retailers, importers, are warning of big price hikes. American exporters are celebrating. Plus: Warren Buffet dumps 90% of his shares in Wal-Mart.

July 10 2015

04:16

Week In The News: Greek Stalemate, High Stakes Glitches, SC Takes Down The Flag

With guest host Michel Martin.

The Confederate Flag to come down in South Carolina. Greece hangs in the balance. Glitches halt trading and flights. Bill Cosby admitted to drugging women. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. A computer error caused the market to temporarily shut down in the mid-morning. (AP)

Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. A computer error caused the market to temporarily shut down in the mid-morning. (AP)

Guests

Yochi Dreazen, managing editor at Foreign Policy. Author of “The Invisible Front.” (@yochidreazen)

Rachel Smolkin, executive editor at CNN Politics. (@rachelsmolkin)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

From The Reading List

Washington Post: Jenny Horne: How a descendant of the president of the Confederacy helped vanquish his flag — “For a moment, it seemed as if the Confederate flag just might keep flying after all. But then Jenny Horne decided that she had had enough. The 42-year-old lawyer from Summerville stepped up to the podium and delivered words so raw and impassioned they would immediately go viral on the Internet. More important, her four-minute speech would alter the course of the debate, and with it, South Carolina history.”

The Wall Street Journal: Fear Grows in Greece as Decisive Hour Nears – “Whether European leaders accept the Greek government’s application for more emergency loans at a crisis summit Sunday still depends on Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras making a drastic turnaround on pension cuts, tax increases and other austerity measures after five months of often-acrimonious negotiations.”

Los Angeles Times: Outages at NYSE, United Airlines, WSJ.com expose digital vulnerabilities — “Wednesday morning’s spate of technological foul-ups grounded United Airlines flights, sidelined the Wall Street Journal’s website and halted trading for more than three hours on the New York Stock Exchange. Their successive timing ignited widespread speculation about hacking attacks and conspiracy theories about who might be responsible. Government and company officials said the causes were more mundane and technical, but the shutdowns nonetheless raise concerns about the vulnerability of vital organizations that can be easily crippled by malfunctions or cyberattacks.”

 

 

04:16

The 2015 Caine Prize For African Writing

With guest host Michel Martin.

The winner and two finalists of the big Caine Prize for African Writing.

Writer Namwali Serpell is the winner of the 2015 Caine Prize for African Writing. (Courtesy Caine Prize For African Writing)

Writer Namwali Serpell is the winner of the 2015 Caine Prize for African Writing. (Courtesy Caine Prize For African Writing)

Guests

Namwali Serpell, author and winner of the 2015 Caine Prize For African Writing. Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. (@snamwali)

Masande Ntshanga, author and novelist. 2015 Caine Prize Finalist. His debut novel is “The Reactive.” (@mntshanga)

Elnathan John, writer and lawyer. 2015 Caine Prize Finalist. (@elnathan)

From The Reading List

NPR News: Caine Prize Winner: Literature Is Not A Competitive Sport — “Newly named Caine Prize winner Namwali Serpell says that her ‘act of mutiny’ — as she calls it — was premeditated. The literary prize, awarded annually to just one African writer for a short story written in English, comes with a financial reward — just over $15,000. The Zambian writer says she’d dreamed up her mutiny days before the Monday ceremony: If she should win, she’d split that sum with her fellow nominees.”

The Guardian: Caine prize goes to Zambian Namwali Serpell – “Serpell said her story was about two men who had known each other since childhood, how they have gone through ‘a long process of trying to build a political movement together, which failed, and in the process falling in love with the same woman, who died. It’s about trying to come to terms with that. It has multiple inspirations,’ she added. ‘When I was 17 I had a dream about a sack, and I didn’t know if I was on the inside or the outside.'”

CNN: 5 things you need to know about Caine Prize winner Namwali Serpell – “Zambian author Namwali Serpell has won the 2015 Caine Prize for African writing for her short story ‘The Sack‘ — the first time a Zambian author has scooped the prestigious award. Described as ‘truly luminous’ by Chair of the judges Zoe Wicomb, the story explores the fraught relationship between two men in a love triangle with a dead woman.”

Read “The Sack” By Namwali Serpell

Read “Space” By Masande Ntshanga

Read “Flying” By Elnathan John

July 09 2015

15:00

Taking Down The Confederate Flag

With guest host Michel Martin.

South Carolina votes to take down the Confederate flag.  Is it a new day in the South?

A Confederate battle flag flies in front of the South Carolina statehouse Wednesday, July 8, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. The House is expected to debate a measure Wednesday that would remove the flag from the Capitol grounds. (AP)

A Confederate battle flag flies in front of the South Carolina statehouse Wednesday, July 8, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. The House is expected to debate a measure Wednesday that would remove the flag from the Capitol grounds. (AP)

The Confederate Battle Flag. The Stars and Bars. A symbol of White Supremacy or Southern Pride? Now, the South Carolina Legislature has voted to remove the flag from the grounds of the South Carolina Capitol. So we ask whether this debate is about more than a flag. Is this a moment for new thinking about what it means to be a Southerner in the 21st century? Or is the pull of the past just too strong?  Is there a way to embrace the history and leave the hate behind? This hour, On Point: the fate of the flag and the future of the South.

– Michel Martin

Guests

Kathleen Parker, syndicated columnist at the Washington Post. (@kathleenparker)

Walter Mosley, novelist and author. His latest book is “And Sometimes I Wonder About You.”

Ron Rash, poet, novelist and author. Professor in Appalachian cultural studies at Western Carolina University. His forthcoming book is “Above the Waterfall.”

Ben Jones, spokesperson for the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Former Democratic Congressman from Georgia. Played Cooter Davenport on The Dukes of Hazard. (@cootersplace)

From The Reading List

The State: S.C. House votes to remove Confederate flag from State House grounds — “The Confederate flag will leave the South Carolina State House grounds after five decades this week after the House overwhelmingly approved a bill to remove the Civil War icon early Thursday morning. The House voted 94-20 to banish the flag from the Capitol after more than 12 hours of debate over the historic measure.”

Washington Post: Take down the Confederate flag, South Carolina — “To me personally, the flag was offensive long before a mad-boy of evil heart gunned down nine lovely, innocent people as they included him in their prayers. As I wrote many years ago, I was just as afraid of a pickup truck with a Confederate flag in the window as any African American would be. This is because we all know that the occupants of that truck mean no good by showing that flag. It says: Danger.”

The Atlantic: What This Cruel War Was Over — “The Confederate flag should not come down because it is offensive to African Americans. The Confederate flag should come down because it is embarrassing to all Americans. The embarrassment is not limited to the flag, itself. The fact that it still flies, that one must debate its meaning in 2015, reflects an incredible ignorance. A century and a half after Lincoln was killed, after 750,000 of our ancestors died, Americans still aren’t quite sure why.”

 

14:00

Sanctuary Cities And A San Francisco Shooting

With guest host Michel Martin.

A fatal shooting in San Francisco by an undocumented man – a 7-time felon, deported 5 times – has re-ignited the immigration debate.

A mourner lays down flowers following a vigil for Kathryn Steinle, Monday, July 6, 2015, on Pier 14 in San Francisco. Steinle was gunned down while out for an evening stroll at Pier 14 with her father and a family friend on Wednesday, July 1. (AP)

A mourner lays down flowers following a vigil for Kathryn Steinle, Monday, July 6, 2015, on Pier 14 in San Francisco. Steinle was gunned down while out for an evening stroll at Pier 14 with her father and a family friend on Wednesday, July 1. (AP)

Kathryn Steinle was taking in one of San Francisco’s popular tourist sites with her father when a gunshot took her life. It would have been tragic under any circumstances, but when it emerged that her accused killer is an undocumented immigrant who’d been deported time and time again, the tragedy became a political firestorm. And it’s turned the spotlight on so-called sanctuary cities like San Francisco where local officials keep US immigration officials at arms- length. They say the policy makes their cities safer. Critics say it’s the opposite. This hour On Point: a closer look at Sanctuary.

– Michel Martin

Guests

Carla Marinucci, political reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle. (@cmarinucci)

Avideh Moussavian, attorney at the National Immigration Law Center. (@avidehnilc)

Julie Myers Wood, CEO of Guidepost Solutions. Former head of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security. (@myerswood)

From The Reading List

San Francisco Chronicle: S.F. pier killing resonating in campaigns, immigration debate — “From the presidential stage to California’s local political contests, it may be accused killer Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, a Mexican citizen with a string of deportations and drug-related felonies in the U.S., who becomes this year’s Willie Horton and shapes the debate over illegal immigration.”

CNN: What’s a ‘sanctuary city,’ and why should you care? — “There’s no legal definition of a sanctuary city, county or state, and what it means varies from place to place. But jurisdictions that fall under that controversial term — supporters oppose it — generally have policies or laws that limit the extent to which law enforcement and other government employees will go to assist the federal government on immigration matters.”

Christian Science Monitor: San Francisco shooting puts scrutiny on big-city ‘sanctuary’ policies — “Indeed, immigration continues to be one of the most fiercely partisan issues in the nation, with sharp divisions among conservatives and liberals on how to approach to the problems. Last week’s shooting has laid bare the different philosophies about how federal and local officials should or shouldn’t interface, and how cities can best address the issues related to undocumented immigrants. For progressives and other supporters of the decades-long sanctuary movement, the shooting does not change their commitment to what they see as a humanitarian and pragmatic approach.”

 

July 08 2015

15:00

Summer Camp (And The Living Is Easy)

With guest host Michel Martin.

Pack your sleeping bag. Leave your iPhone at home.  We’re heading off to summer camp. Our midsummer salute to an American tradition.

In this photo taken Friday, June 12, 2015, at Camp Coniston John Tilley, executive director, walks through the camp as they prepare to open for the summer season in Croyden, N.H. (AP)

In this photo taken Friday, June 12, 2015, at Camp Coniston John Tilley, executive director, walks through the camp as they prepare to open for the summer season in Croyden, N.H. (AP)

Sweet summer. A time to kick back, relax—and shuttle the kids from soccer camp to band camp, to SAT prep, art class and oh, I don’t know…Spanish tutoring? Kids have a huge array of summer activities today, especially if their parents have some money to spare. But it wasn’t always this way. Hence sleepaway camp. Back in the day, camp was a spartan, back-to-nature affair,  where city parents would send their city kids ALL summer long: for fresh air and largely unscripted fun. This hour, On Point: Summer camp—is this another American tradition going by the way side?

– Michel Martin

Guests

Leslie Paris, professor of American history at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Author of “Children’s Nature: The Rise of the American Summer Camp.

Brooke Salkoff, founder of CampEasy.com. (@brookesalkoff)

Jean MacDonald, founder of App Camp for Girls. (@macgenie)

Mickey Black, owner and director of the Pine Forest Camp in Greeley, Pennsylvania.

From The Reading List

The Atlantic: In Praise of Summer Camp — “The first North American summer camps embodied Thoreau’s belief that sojourns into the wilderness were essential in the face of ‘over-civilization.’ Earlier ventures, like the two-week camping trips organized by the Gunnery School in Washington, Connecticut, in 1861, had been extensions of existing educational institutions. The first private summer camp, the North Mountain School of Physical Culture, was founded by Dr. Joseph Trimble Rothrock, an environmentalist and ‘father of forestry,’ in 1876 near Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.”

New Yorker: A Summer Camp for Making Apps, Not Friendship Bracelets — “The other day, in Portland, Oregon, a congregation of a dozen girls agreed that they did not like Justin Bieber; what excited them was Xcode, the suite of tools that Apple provides to software developers. Most of the girls were hearing of it for the first time, at the ‘beta’ session of App Camp For Girls, a weeklong program that teaches participants, ages twelve to fourteen, how to design and pitch iPhone apps.”

Vanity Fair: How iPhones Ruined Summer Camp – “Camp should seemingly be about separating from the familiar and forging new personal ground. But while some contemporary camps, like a $12,000-per-session one I found deep in the Adirondacks, disallow mobile devices and cellular parental contact for the entirety of the session, most preserve some electronic tether to home. Some, like a well-reputed performing-arts camp in the Catskills, ban phones for only the first week, allowing subsequent access daily during designated times. Others, like a camp in Connecticut, allow parents to e-mail their child regularly, but not vice versa. Or they encourage only hand-written communication, in one direction.

14:00

No More No Child Left Behind?

With guest host Michel Martin.

The end of No Child Left Behind. Lawmakers debate an all-new federal education policy. We’ll look at the proposals and pushback.

In this May 14, 2015, file photo, Education Secretary Arne Duncan visits with young student Mario Corona, age 6, in kindergarten at McGlone Elementary School in the Montbello section of Denver. The Obama administration is giving seven more states and the District of Columbia more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law. In addition to Washington, Duncan on June 23 renewed waivers for Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, and West Virginia. (AP)

In this May 14, 2015, file photo, Education Secretary Arne Duncan visits with young student Mario Corona, age 6, in kindergarten at McGlone Elementary School in the Montbello section of Denver. The Obama administration is giving seven more states and the District of Columbia more flexibility from the requirements of the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law. In addition to Washington, Duncan on June 23 renewed waivers for Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New York, and West Virginia. (AP)

Just about every presidential campaign produces a memorable line and the 2000 campaign was no exception. Ending “the soft bigotry of low expectations” was then candidate George W. Bush’s rallying cry for education reform. Two years later came No Child Left Behind, and soon after that came the complaints from critics: it was too rigid, too punitive, and above all, it relied on too much testing. Now, a bipartisan group in Congress is set to replace the law — but will the changes make the grade? This hour, On Point: what’s next for No Child Left Behind.

– Michel Martin

Guests

Lyndsey Layton, national education reporter for the Washington Post. (@lyndseylayton)

Kati Haycock, president of the Education Trust, a non-profit education advocacy organization.

Chester Finn, distinguished senior fellow and president emeritus of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Founding partner at the Edison Project. Author of the forthcoming book, “Failing Our Brightest Kids.”

From The Reading List

USA Today: Senate poised to take up education bill — “The U.S. Senate, for the first time in 14 years, will debate an all-new federal education policy this week. The bipartisan proposal would do away with the No Child Left Behind law and reduce — but not end — the federal government’s role in public elementary and secondary education.”

Washington Post: Finally, Congress to start debate on No Child Left Behind rewrite — “Taken as a whole package, the Senate bill ends federal accountability micro-managing, makes use of student scores to evaluate teachers an option, allows some states to design performance assessment systems, and recognizes parent opt-out rights. Repealing most of the pernicious testing and accountability provisions of NCLB would be real progress for the nation’s students, teachers and schools.”

POLITICO: The Shake Shack summit that saved the education bill – “The unanimous vote on the bill in committee Thursday reflects HELP Committee member’s faith in the way Alexander and Murray have gone about tackling NCLB. It doesn’t mean they still don’t have serious qualms about the bill: Several Democrats including Warren, Franken and Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) were clear Thursday that they have serious concerns with the way the bill handles accountability and would prefer it have a stronger federal role from a civil rights standpoint. Civil rights groups feel the same way and could mount opposition.”

 

 

 

July 07 2015

15:00

The Path To Scrabble V-I-C-T-O-R-Y

With guest host Michel Martin.

From the living room to world championships, Scrabble is fun—and fiercely competitive. We’ll dig in.

Freddy Osborne, left, and teammate Nikolai Darken, second left, both from Fairfield, Conn., play a word against teammates Yanni Raymond, right, and Knox Daniel, second right, both from Charlottesville, Va., during the first round at the 2015 North American School SCRABBLE Championship at Hasbro headquarters in Pawtucket, R.I., Saturday, May 16, 2015.  (AP)

Freddy Osborne, left, and teammate Nikolai Darken, second left, both from Fairfield, Conn., play a word against teammates Yanni Raymond, right, and Knox Daniel, second right, both from Charlottesville, Va., during the first round at the 2015 North American School SCRABBLE Championship at Hasbro headquarters in Pawtucket, R.I., Saturday, May 16, 2015. (AP)

High-stakes negotiations, backroom deals, fisticuffs, even death threats? It is the world of competitive Scrabble. You heard me—Scrabble. The game you played on rainy days has a cut throat, competitive, obsessive side, where players memorize over a hundred thousand words, compete for thousands of dollars—and get so worked up over banned words they’re willing to kill over them—or so they claim. Now the man who headed the National Scrabble Association for a quarter century is telling all. This hour On Point: digging deep into world of Scrabble.

– Michel Martin

Guests

John D. Williams, Jr., author of the new book “Word Nerd: Dispatches from the Games, Grammar and Geek Underground.” Former executive direction of the National Scrabble Association. Co-author of “Everything SCRABBLE.”

Robin Pollock Daniel, one of the top-ranked Scrabble players in the world.

From The Reading List

The New Republic: Under a Spell — “If you play a lot of Scrabble, as I do with strangers and friends via my smartphone, reaching into my pocket like a pack-a-day smoker, then to play a great word—a killer word, a game-tilting whodathunkit word, a quantifiable bon mot—brings a waft of neurochemical bliss every time. Play this game enough, you start to see words not as units of language, per se, but as discrete ways to organize letters, molecules that structure otherwise unruly atoms, with a collocating power akin to poker hands. The joy of finding a sublime word in the alphabet soup—or, even better, cultivating your rack of letters and jockeying the board to set you up for that moment—is palpable, almost audible.”

NPR News: Too Much ‘Word,’ Not Enough ‘Nerd’ In This Scrabble Story — “Like the game itself, Word Nerd has its ups and downs. Much of it somewhat tediously chronicles Williams’s years of promoting the game through national and international tournaments and the National School Scrabble Program. It also spells out the loss of the job he loved, after the priorities of Scrabble’s corporate owner Hasbro changed. Although Word Nerd features some of the same eccentric players introduced in Word Freak (including ‘G.I. Joel’ Sherman, so-called because of his gastrointestinal woes), Fatsis’sportraits are sharper.”

Huffington Post: How To Win At Scrabble, According To Former Director Of National Scrabble Association — “When it comes to Scrabble chops, Williams says a ‘good working vocabulary’ and spelling abilities are no-brainers. But, he says, ‘people often don’t realize it’s very much about math and spatial relationships as well. One has to assess the board, calculate all the possibilities in terms of both points and positioning, that sort of thing. And remember, a good Scrabble move is not always about the most points.'”

Read An Excerpt Of “Word Nerd” By John D. Williams, Jr.

14:00

Greeks Say 'No' To Debt Deal And 'Yes' To An Uncertain Future

With guest host Michel Martin.

Greeks spoke and said no to the European ultimatum.  Folly or bravery, these are uncharted waters for Europe and Greece.

Supporters of the No vote celebrate after the results of the referendum in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki, Sunday, July 5, 2015. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected creditors’ demands for more austerity in return for rescue loans in a critical referendum Sunday, backing Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who insisted the vote would give him a stronger hand to reach a better deal.  (AP)

Supporters of the No vote celebrate after the results of the referendum in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki, Sunday, July 5, 2015. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected creditors’ demands for more austerity in return for rescue loans in a critical referendum Sunday, backing Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who insisted the vote would give him a stronger hand to reach a better deal. (AP)

Greek voters celebrated in the streets after this weekend’s big vote against Europe’s latest offer for a new bailout but now what? Greek banks are running out of money, and its citizens are too — facing the possibility of an economic meltdown. Meanwhile the rest of Europe is divided over what to do next: offer more concessions to Greece to stave off disaster, demand more austerity even though Greeks just said no, or let the beleaguered nation go its own way? Meanwhile refugees from the Middle East and elsewhere are still coming. This hour On Point: what’s next for Greece?

– Michel Martin 

Guests

John Psaropoulos, independent journalist based in Athens. Blogs at The New Athenian. (@thenewathenian)

Christian Rickens, head of the business and economic desk at Spiegel Online. (@chrisric71)

Scheherazade Rehman, professor of international finance and business and international affairs at George Washington University, where she is also director of the European Union Research Center. (@prof_rehman)

From The Reading List

The New Athenian: Greeks say: No more austerity — “Greeks overwhelmingly voted against further austerity on Sunday, in a referendum of crucial importance to the country’s economic and political future. With three quarters of votes counted, the No vote, backed by the ruling leftists, won more than 61 percent of the vote, far above the 36 percent of the vote the ruling Syriza took in January’s general election. The Yes vote, backed by the opposition, took only 38 percent.”

The Wall Street Journal: Germany Stays Tough on Debt Relief for Greece — “Finding a solution to Greece’s financial troublesis urgent if Europe wants to keep its currency union intact. The eurozone portion of Greece’s €245 billion bailout has expired, and a default on a €1.56 billion payment to the IMF last week means Athens isn’t eligible for any more loans from the fund. A crucial €3.5 billion bond repayment to the European Central Bank is already due on July 20.”

Spiegel Online: The Price Of Five Years of Cowardice — “For the past five years, politicians within the euro zone, under German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s unofficial leadership, have shirked painful decisions that might have helped to solve the debt crisis in Greece. The consequence has been that the problems have been protracted rather than solved. This trend began with the first Greek bailout program in 2010. In order to prevent a Greek default, the euro-zone states provided their first credit guarantees to Athens at the time.”

July 06 2015

15:00

Foster Children, Disjointed Families

With guest host Michel Martin.

An intimate look at the foster care system from the perspective of two families struggling to reunite with their children.

A still from the upcoming documentary film, "Tough Love." (Courtesy PBS / The Filmmakers)

A still from the upcoming documentary film, “Tough Love.” (Courtesy PBS / The Filmmakers)

All too often the evening news carries some gut wrenching story of children mistreated by their parents. But abuse is actually not the reason most children go to foster care: they are there because of neglect. But what does that actually mean? And do parents get a chance to clean up their act? And does anybody help them? Those were the kinds of questions filmmaker Stephanie Wang Breal tried to answer in her new documentary, “Tough Love.” This hour On Point: an inside look at the child welfare system through the eyes of two parents trying to get their children back.

– Michel Martin

Guests

Stephanie Wang-Breal, director and producer. Her new film, “Tough Love” appears on PBS this month. (@woainimommy)

Hannah Siddique, Brooklyn-based mother and waitress. Her two older children were placed in foster care and later released to their father.

Patricia Clark, former superior court judge for the King County Superior Court’s Juvenile Court in Washington state.

From The Reading List

New York Times Motherlode: A Familiar Sense of Uncertainty — “As a new foster parent, and as someone who craves all the answers, the lack of accessibility to personal stories and opinions from foster parents and birth parents with children in the foster care system has been jarring. Sure, I’ve read a couple of recommended books and I’ve connected with other foster families through my agency and on social media, but the amount of available information still feels inadequate compared to what I’m used to. I want more.”

San Jose Mercury News: California Senate passes sweeping reforms to curb psych medications in foster care — ” In a major step toward curtailing the excessive use of psychiatric drugs on foster children, the California Senate on Thursday approved a package of bills that is already being eyed as a model in Washington, D.C., and across the country. The four proposed laws — if approved by the state Assembly and signed by the governor — would become the nation’s most sweeping set of legislative reforms to curb the foster care system’s reliance on psychotropic medications.”

Lansing State Journal: Michigan foster care ‘a persistent and dire problem’ – “Patty Babcock, director of the Florida Institute for Child Welfare, said one of the biggest problems — in Michigan or anywhere else — is that society has accepted failure. ‘If this were medicine or aviation, we would never tolerate the number of errors that are made,’ she said. ‘We would never tolerate this many bad drugs going out or planes going down.'”

Watch The Trailer For “Tough Love”

[Watch on YouTube]
14:00

Politics, Tragedy And Religion In The Public Sphere

With guest host Michel Martin.

How should we talk about faith and God in these uncertain times? We put that tough question—and more—to a roundtable of religious thinkers.

President Barack Obama speaks during services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C., at the College of Charleston TD Arena. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston.  (AP)

President Barack Obama speaks during services honoring the life of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Friday, June 26, 2015, in Charleston, S.C., at the College of Charleston TD Arena. Pinckney was one of the nine people killed in the shooting at Emanuel AME Church last week in Charleston. (AP)

For millions of Americans faith is fundamental; the freedom to worship and to worship as they choose is as important as any other right. Yet increasingly many Americans are choosing not to worship at all, and some of these Americans see religious expression, especially in the public arena, as distasteful, even oppressive. In the wake of the Charleston church shootings and the Supreme Court decision on same sex marriage, expressions of faith are in the forefront, are they causing Americans to rethink their beliefs or just reinforcing them. This hour On Point: faith revisited.

– Michel Martin

Guests

Rev. Delman Coates, senior pastor of the Mt. Ennon Baptist Church in Clinton, MD. (@iamdelmancoates)

Beth Felker Jones, associate professor of theology at Wheaton College. Author of “Practicing Christian Doctrine.” (@bethfelkerjones)

Rev. Josh Pawelek, parish minister at Unitarian-Universalist Society East in Manchester, CT. (@revjoshpawelek)

Philip Rucker, national political reporter for the Washington Post. (@philiprucker)

From The Reading List

The Daily Beast: In Charleston, We Saw Christianity at its Best — “Which is what made the remarks of the Charleston tragedy survivors so inspiring. When various family members, one after the other, said that they forgave the perpetrator, they embodied Christianity at its best, without an iota of hypocrisy to be found. For so long people have seen high-profile Christians talk about love in one breath while making incredibly intolerant remarks about others—poor people, gay people, people of other religions—in the next breath. The incredible humanity the survivors showed gave us all something to aspire to, and it came from their deep-rooted faith.”

Pew Research Center: America’s Changing Religious Landscape – “The United States remains home to more Christians than any other country in the world, and a large majority of Americans – roughly seven-in-ten – continue to identify with some branch of the Christian faith. But the major new survey of more than 35,000 Americans by the Pew Research Center finds that the percentage of adults (ages 18 and older) who describe themselves as Christians has dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years, from 78.4% in an equally massive Pew Research survey in 2007 to 70.6% in 2014.”

Washington Post: In a fast-changing culture, can the GOP get in step with modern America? – “Across the cultural landscape, the national consensus is evolving rapidly, epitomized by this year’s convulsions of celebrity, social issues and politics — including the acceptance of Caitlyn Jenner’s gender identity, Pope Francis’s climate-change decree and the widespread shunning of the Confederate flag.”

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